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2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 7270 words || 
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1. Halpern, Cynthia. and Nackenoff, Carol. "(Un)Doing the State: Feminist Theorists and the Transformation of 21st Century Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p64943_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Argues that the most profound contribution of the feminist attack on the prevailing liberal paradigm of the state has been and continues to be the salience and importance of difference itself. Despite dangers feminists have experienced when having recourse to difference, a nonessentialist examination of difference--including particularity, historicity, subjectivity--reveals the importance of difference to politics in the 21st century.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 230 words || 
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2. Monteiro, Nuno. and Ruby, Keven. "Theory Is What We Make of It: Why IR Theorists Should Stop Debating the Philosophy of Science" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181565_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: One of the most unfortunate features of International Relations as a discipline is the existence of a self-appointed "Philosophy of Science Police." When writing, presenting, debating, or publishing one's research, one always risks being told one's ontology is wrong or one's epistemology is untenable -- or worse, both. Ever since the emergence of the so-called "Third Debate" between positivists and post-positivists in the late eighties, philosophy-of-science arguments have been explicitly deployed by IR theorists in support of their own worldview and, even more frequently, as a weapon hurled against the world views of paradigmatic competitors. In this paper, we argue this approach to IR-theorizing is wrongheaded. Importing philosophy-of-science arguments into IR theory neither contributes to the resolution of the philosophical debates on which they draw nor advances our understanding of politics among states. We show why this is the case and advance an alternative perspective drawing on the pragmatic philosophy of science of Arthur Fine's "The Natural Ontological Attitude." We argue that NOA would serve well the purposes of political scientists in general and IR theorists in particular, as it is a minimalist philosophy of science aimed at insulating scientific practice from foundational philosophical questions that remain deeply contested within philosophy of science itself. By devolving scrutiny back to the internal standards of the field, a pragmatic approach to the philosophy of science makes room for theoretical and methodological pluralism.

2009 - 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 212 words || 
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3. Kiuchi, Yuya. "The Black Image in the Black Mind: W.E.B. Du Bois as a Visual Theorist after 1903" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA, Mar 19, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301722_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The concepts such as the veil and the double consciousness introduced in The Souls of Black Folk, as well as his involvement in a photo exhibition in Paris in 1900 characterize W.E.B. Du Bois as one of the pioneering African American visual theorists. He explored the intricate difference between how African Americans perceived themselves and how society perceived them. Similar investigations of black images in American society rose in number as visual arts became more popular in the second half of the twentieth century. Although the foundational concepts Du Bois introduced early in the century enrich our knowledge of African American history, intellectual historians have disproportionately focused on his scholarship around the turn of the century, and have somewhat ignored how Du Bois developed his idea on black images later in his career. Du Bois extensively wrote and spoke on African American images as the U.S. witnessed an expansion in visual arts from movies to television. My paper examines Du Bois’ analyses of African American images in the first half of the twentieth century as described in his autobiographies, as well as other writings such as Dusk of Dawn, and in his speeches. It will reveal a new, and relatively pessimistic, dimension of the history of black images in the twentieth century.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6713 words || 
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4. Huebner, Daniel. "In Reference To G. H. Mead: Tracing the Development of a Foundational Social Theorist" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 20, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p506583_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: George Herbert Mead, although a philosopher himself, is primarily referred to in contemporary scholarship by sociologists. This has not always been the case, rather it is the result of a transformation in the predominant understandings of his work in the first half of the twentieth century. Utilizing a uniquely constructed dataset, which includes informal references as well as formal citations, this paper traces the shifts in the legacy of G. H. Mead in American academic disciplines. I build on scholarship in the sociology of knowledge and the history of sociology in demonstrating that the dominant understanding of Mead is the result of identifiable social practices of interpretation and reference. In particular, this analysis highlights the importance of social institutions and personal relationships in determining patterns of knowledge transfer.

2007 - Rural Sociological Society Words: 163 words || 
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5. Schaffer, Harwood. "Henry A. Wallace: Social Theorist of the New Deal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Marriott Santa Clara, Santa Clara, California, <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p187218_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Henry A. Wallace served as Secretary of Agriculture for seven and a half years under Roosevelt, a post that his father held ten years earlier, and is the acknowledged philosopher of Roosevelt’s New Deal. He served as Vice President during Roosevelt’s third term with key responsibilities for gearing up for the war. He was passed over as Roosevelt’s running mate in 1944 because of his outspoken opposition to racial discrimination and his advocacy of building ties with USSR rather than the developing Cold War. He subsequently served as Secretary of Commerce for the beginning of Roosevelt’s fourth term and during part of Truman’s tenure. Wallace is often remembered as a quixotic progressive candidate during the 1948 presidential election. While Wallace is seen as a pioneer in agricultural economics and econometrics, this paper argues that Wallace is an unrecognized social theorist who tackled questions that academic sociologists of the time were content to ignore: race, gender, war and peace, and a just economic system.

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