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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,340 records.
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2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 75 words || 
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1. Alvarez- McHatton, Patricia. "Thinking about our Thinking about our Thinking: Marginalia and Found Poetry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p557150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Reflection is an activity highly regarded in teacher preparation. Traditionally, students are required to respond to their reading through a written text that more often exemplifies the instructor’s perspective rather than the student’s own meaning making process. This presentation highlights the use of marginalia – conversations between the reader and the text – and found poems emerging from those conversations as a metacognitive strategy which engages students in “thinking about their thinking about their thinking.”

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8051 words || 
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2. Shaw, Adrienne. and Chess, Shira. "4chan Thinks We Are Scientologists, YouTube Thinks We Are Creationists, and Twitter Thinks We Are Marxists: GamerGate, Anti-Intellectualism, and Antifeminism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983370_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is a tendency in popular and academic discussions of this GamerGate to treat it as something that is unique to games. By focusing on just the academic conspiracy theories of GamerGaters we are able to see how this movement embodies trends that are of particular concern to all scholars. Many of the GamerGate critiques of academia tap into broader anti-intellectual trends in U.S. culture. We also show that GamerGate discourse draws on a long history of connecting feminism to communism in the United States (Storrs, 2007). As feminist scholarship practice increasingly attempts to make academic work more widely accessible, it allows feminist work to be available for critique and harassment in a way other scholarship rarely is. At the same time, this also means that feminist scholarship is uniquely positioned to speak for itself when it is mischaracterized and to change minds even as it is attacked.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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3. Lourenco de Freitas, Erika. and Ramalho de Oliveira, Djenane. "“Thinking outside the box”: critical thinking in pharmacy classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719808_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In order to understand how pedagogical practices influence students’ development of critical thinking skills, we used participant observation, focus groups and in-depth interviews to examine how students, faculty and curriculum stakeholders navigate this subject at the College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota. Two semesters of fieldwork suggested that there is a subtle discrepancy between students’ and faculty’s perspectives when it comes to teaching and learning critical thinking skills in the classroom. The disconnection between teaching approaches and evaluation was pointed out as a factor that hindered critical thinking. Case studies, small group discussions and ‘experiential learning’ were emphasized as pedagogical approaches that foster critical thinking learning, but there are factors associated with the classroom setting that may prevent them to fully achieve their goal. The knowledge that emerged from this study will allow educators to design learning activities to more effectively develop these essential skills in our future caregivers.

2013 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 39 words || 
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4. zheng, qun. "No I think you’re wrong: a sociopragmatic study of I think" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Sheraton Dallas, Dallas, Texas, Mar 16, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p625328_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study of "I think" investigates 1185 individual speakers in the BNC and compares the British and Chinese English speaker in socio-pragmatic way. It highlights the variation of discourse marker usage and problematizes a monolithic view in language pedagogy.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 136 words || 
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5. McKean, Jerome. "Fast Thinking, Slow Thinking, and Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574716_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Daniel Kahneman’s recent publication, Thinking, Fast and Slow reviews his work on prospect theory and integrates it with other noteworthy experiments in the psychology of cognition and perception. Kahneman’s work has a number of implications for the study of crime and reaction to crime. We may roughly classify the theory as implying two theses: (1) all humans have heuristic biases that enable them to make quick (“fast thinking), unconscious assessments and decisions, but that may lead to irrational behavior; and (2) humans vary in the extent to which they can overcome such biases through more deliberate, “slower” thinking. His work and in the related work by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein (Nudge), are reviewed. The specific hypotheses relevant to criminology are catalogued and the broader implications of the theory are considered.

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