Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,167 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 434 - Next  Jump:
2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 90 words || 
Info
1. Liu, Weidi. and Wang, Xia. "Racial and Ethnic Threat and Hate Crime: A Test of the Political, Economic, and Criminal Threat Hypotheses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1277269_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A small number of studies have tested the minority threat perspective by examining the relationship between racial composition and hate crime. Although these studies have significantly advanced scholarship, they have rarely distinguished between multiple dimensions of minority threat. Using city-level data drawn from National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and Census data, this study extends prior research by testing the political, economic, and criminal threat hypotheses and exploring whether they exert differential effects on anti-black and anti-Hispanic hate crime. We discuss the findings and their implications for theory, research, and policy.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 250 words || 
Info
2. Aoki, Yu. "Words or Deeds: The Credibility of Verbal Threats and Military Threats in International Crises" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1329685_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In international crises, states could coerce adversaries by verbally threatening or militarily threatening short of war, but which form of threats is more credible? From a costly signals’ standpoint, verbal threats are tying-hands signals based on domestic audience costs or international reputational costs, and military threats are forms of sunk-cost signals. Since Fearon’s influential articles, however, only limited work has been done on sunk-cost signals compared to tying-hands signals, and competitive empirical tests for the two types of threats are limited. This paper fills this gap by conducting historical case studies that examine the effect of tying-hands mechanism and power respectively on the credibility of verbal threats and the effect of sunk-cost mechanism on the credibility of military threats. I choose international crises in which a threatening state is a democracy with an honest reputation that had issued both verbal threats and military threats to examine the relative impact of each threat on the threatened state’s perceptions of the threatening state’s resolve. With simple case selection rules, I examine all the relevant cases from two most systematic datasets for compellence and deterrence, and report all cases that turn out to be informative. My tentative examination suggests that military threats are stronger signals than verbal threats. Furthermore, power do not inform the credibility of verbal threats once crises started. One tentative implication from these findings is that no matter how powerful threatening states are, they have to back up their words with actions to make their threats credible once crises escalated.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 8357 words || 
Info
3. Jin, Yan., Pang, Augustine. and Cameron, Glen. "Explicating Threats: Towards a Conceptual Understanding of the Faces and Fabric of Threat in an Organizational Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14911_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Threat has been commonly used to describe the state of seizure a nation, organization, or individual, is in during a crisis. Even though it is such a heavily used word, the concept of threat has not been fully explicated, particularly in public relations literature. Yet, threat, which is often used interchangeably with “risk,” “fear,” and “conflict,” is both the cause, and the effect, of crisis. This conceptual paper proposes the explication of the concept by expanding, cross-fertilizing, and integrating ideas from an inter-disciplinary review of literature. The dimensionality of threats in a crisis is enumerated, and a threat appraisal model, with a series of propositions, based on the cognitive, affective, and conative levels, is offered to test the effects of threats. The authors believe that a clearer conceptual understanding of the faces and fabric of threat in crisis have enormous implications for theory development in public relations, in particular, in the understanding and diagnosing of threats in crisis, which, in turn, affects how crisis can be communicated, managed, and survived by organizations.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5020 words || 
Info
4. Shin, Mija., Van de Vord, Rebecca. and Chen, Yi-Chun "Yvonnes". "Physical Threat Versus Social Threat: Effects of Antidrug PSAs on the Viewer’s Cognitive and Emotional Responses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173092_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study investigated how college students process different types of fear appeals used in antidrug public service announcements. Past research has more focused on the difference in the effects of fear versus nonfear appeals. However, little research examined different types of appeals used within fear messages. This study compared physical threat and social threat used in these messages and how each type affects the television viewers’ cognitive and emotional processing of the messages. Differences between the 2 types of threat messages in the processing observed through the viewers’ physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance response and facial EMG) were reported in this study. Further, how females and males process these threat messages was also examined.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 8340 words || 
Info
5. Brader, Ted., Valentino, Nicholas. and Suhay, Elizabeth. "Seeing Threats vs. Feeling Threats: Group Cues, Emotions, and Activating Opposition to Immigration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 04, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p60836_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 434 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy