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2005 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7918 words || 
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1. Kurtz, Karl., Moncrief, Gary., Niemi, Richard. and Powell, Lynda. "Full Time, Part Time and Real Time: Legislators'' Perceptions of Time on the Job" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Oakland, California, Mar 17, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p87334_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we report findings from a survey of state legislators in which we ask them about the time they spend being a legislator. As expected, we find substantial differences in self-reported time on the job in different states. But we also find that legislators spend more time on the job than one might anticipate, given the "part-time" nature of many state legislatures. We discuss these findings in the context of the concept of legislative professionalism. Furthermore, we model time on the job as a function of a series of institutional-level and individual-level variables. We also explore the variety of activities involved in the legislative job.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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2. Perrucci, Robert. and MacDermid, Shelley. "Time and Control in a 24/7 Environment: Clock Time, Work Time, Family Time." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241028_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 6445 words || 
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3. Xu, Shan. and David, Prabu. "Multitasking Distorts Time Perceptions: Examining Time Passage and Time Duration During Media Multitasking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, we examine two measures associated with the psychology of time— passage and duration. Time was perceived to “fly by” in the high-entertainment condition that involved watching a sitcom, whereas time “dragged on” in the low-entertainment condition that involved reading a journal article. Likewise, estimated time duration in minutes also was longer in the high-entertainment condition than the low-entertainment condition. In addition, activity-switching had a significant effect on time passage and time duration. In comparison to the low-entertainment condition, participants perceived time to pass quickly and estimated longer time duration when switching between the low- and high-entertainment activities. Further, individual differences in multitasking habits and preferences were found to be negatively correlated with time duration estimation, suggesting automatic cognitive adjustments by chronic multitaskers to offset time distortions associated with multitasking. Implications for theory and measurement of media and communication research are discussed.

2005 - International Studies Association Words: 179 words || 
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4. Santana, Maria. "The Coverage of Three International Newspapers on India's Super Power Capabilities in the Region: A Content Analysis of The Times of India, New York Times and London Times" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70246_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: India's rapid technological growth has given the nation the opportunity to combine its population explosion with impressive gains in economic investment and output. Furthermore, India is now a significant player in global politics, entering the nuclear arm race and continuing to counterbalance relations with neighbor nation Pakistan. How does India fare in coverage by the London Times and New York Times versus the coverage in the national Times of India? Is India taking over the region's political reins? Can India become the next superpower? This study will attempt to answer those questions through a content analysis of the press through Framing Analysis Theory. Media scholars have also explored the question of which factors come into play in influencing frames. News is a socially constructed product, not a reflection of an objective reality. News is not created out of a vacuum, but is influenced by a host of factors. The factors I will be analyzing in the content of news stories about India are of intrinsic or event-related value such as prominence, conflict, human interest, timelessness, proximity and deviance.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Sayer, Liana. and Mattingly, Marybeth. "Gender Differences and Changes over Time in the Relationship between Free Time and Individual's Perceived Time Pressure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105901_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: U.S. adults are increasingly likely to report that they always feel rushed yet some research indicates that free time has increased over the past thirty years, raising questions about the relationship between leisure and time pressures. To date, few scholars have addressed the correlates of feeling rushed and little quantitative research has investigated the relationship between changing patterns of time use and feeling time pressured. In this paper, we review the evidence on changing patterns of free time and consider how the relationship between free time and feeling rushed has changed between 1975 and 1998. Since women more than men are likely to experience a time-crunch, we also consider whether free time affects women's and men's time pressure in different ways. Our findings suggest that women and men feel rushed more often in 1998 than they did in 1975. However, the increase was greater for women than men. In 1975, more free time, and more 'pure' free time were associated with lesser feelings of time pressure for both men and women, but women benefited more from their free time than did men. In 1998, Americans' sense of time pressure was still inversely related to their free time; however, men's time pressure was reduced more by increased free time than was women's. Multivariate analyses confirm these findings and suggest that marriage, employment and parenthood each increase women's but not men's time pressure. Hence, the change in how free time influences women's time pressure may be a result of the added demands placed upon women as they are increasingly responsible not only for maintaining the household and caring for children, but also for contributing to the family's financial well-being.

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