Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 269 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 54 - Next  Jump:
2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 503 words || 
Info
1. Pope, Michell., Garthe, Rachel., Velazquez, Efren. and Corona, Rosalie. "Let’s talk tobacco: African American parent-adolescent communication about tobacco use within the context of parent smoking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957375_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Background: Tobacco use and the associated health risks are a major public health concern. Despite the risks, nearly 44 million Americans have ever smoked (CDC, 2012). Historically African Americans (AA) have exhibited lower rates of use than their racial/ethnic counterparts, but this trend may be changing with the recent surge in the use of alternative tobacco products, or ATPs (e.g., cigars/little cigar/cigarillos; CDC, 2011; SAMSHA, 2011). Between 17% and 30% of these tobacco users are parents (Child Trends, 2013; Wilkinson, Shete, & Prokhorov, 2008). Parents play a vital role in shaping their adolescents’ tobacco-related outcomes via their own tobacco use, communication, and parenting practices (e.g., Leonardi-Bee, Jere & Britton, 2011; Vuolo & Staff, 2013). Thus, this study examines whether AA parents’ smoking, behaviors, and communication are associated with adolescents’ tobacco-related outcomes. Additionally, this study obtained both parent/adolescent perceptions of behaviors/communication.

Methods: Participants were 100 AA parents and their adolescents (ages12-17). Surveys assessed communication, parental prompting behaviors (e.g., “Do you/your parent ask you to empty their ashtray”; “retrieve cigarettes”, “smoke with them?”), and adolescents’ smoking behaviors.

Results: Almost one-third of adolescents had experimented with tobacco (31% had smoked cigarettes; 36% had smoked an ATP). With respect to parental prompting behaviors, 49% reported that they had emptied their parents’ ashtray, 54.5% had been asked to retrieve a tobacco product, 37.6% had been asked to light their parent’s tobacco product, and 19% had been asked to start or hold their parent’s cigarette/cigar/cigarillo.

Preliminary results showed that higher levels of adolescent-reported (β = -.20, p <. 05) and parental-reported (β = -.23, p <. 05) parent-adolescent communication were associated with fewer intentions to use cigarettes. Parental prompting behaviors were associated with higher intentions to use cigarettes, including when parents offered adolescents a cigarette (β = .35, p <. 01). On the other hand, prompting behaviors around emptying a parent’s ashtray were negatively associated with fewer intentions to use cigarettes (β = -.35, p <. 01) and cigars (β = -.34, p <. 01).

When examining the influence of communication and parental prompting on experimentation, adolescent reported positive communication was negatively associated with cigarette, (β = -.20, p <. 05) and cigar/cigarillo experimentation (β = -.21, p <. 05). Additionally, prompting behaviors surrounding parents allowing youth to smoke (β = .25, p <. 05), asking their adolescent to light their tobacco product (β = .21, p <. 05), or asking their adolescent to bring them their tobacco products (β = .22, p <. 05) were associated with more experimentation with cigars/cigarillos. Further analyses will explore these constructs using structural equation modeling.

Discussion: Results reveal how parents that smoke may influence their adolescents’ tobacco intentions to use and/or actual use. Given that parental smoking influences not only parents’ health, but also the health of youth, this study highlights the importance of developing prevention programs that target both parental behaviors and parent/child communication. Moreover, the results show that programs geared to those at heightened risk for smoking and most affected by tobacco-related health disparities are necessary.

2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5512 words || 
Info
2. Smith, Kate., Wakefield, Melanie., Siebel, Catherine., Terry-McElrath, Yvonne. and Ruel, Erin. "The news about tobacco: conveying tobacco messages to the public and policy makers via the press" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112062_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study outlines the portrayal of tobacco issues in the US press over one year. Press coverage is mapped in order to understand its impact on key tobacco use behaviors and policy decisions. Our textual analysis incorporates 6,332 newspaper articles from 350 U.S. daily newspapers.

Newspaper coverage reflects events occurring nationally, and at the state and local levels. It represents attitudes on the part of both the public and newsmakers. The press’ treatment of issues shapes popular attitudes, acts as an agent of public education, and plays an important role in determining the policy agenda (Baillie, 1996). Previous research of the coverage of particular tobacco issues has revealed patterns in terms of its content, slant and frame (Magzamen et al, 2001; Malone et al, 2000), but as yet, however, there has been little comprehensive consideration of press coverage of tobacco, and the potentially competing messages that such coverage may convey.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 4689 words || 
Info
3. Garr, Michael. "Tobacco Use and Health: Pipe and Cigar Smoking As Tobacco Harm Reduction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18442_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study investigates the use of pipes and cigars as alternative ways of using tobacco in order to reduce the risk of harm of smoking. A nationally representative sample of approximately 26,000 adults, 18 and older, from the 2001 National Household Survey of Drug Abuse is used to test the differences in self-rated health of nonsmokers, former smokers, cigarette smokers, cigar smokers and pipe smokers. Using a standard question regarding self-rated health, pipe and cigar smokers should report better self-rated health than cigarette smokers but poorer self-rated health than nonsmokers or former cigarette smokers. The data generally support this hypothesis. As a result pipes and cigars can be seen as a form of tobacco harm reduction, a policy that is preferable to abstinence.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 28 pages || Words: 10969 words || 
Info
4. Moore, Jensen. "Are People Who Use Tobacco More Likely to be Persuaded by Anti-tobacco Ads that Make Them the Victim?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374934_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study used a 3 (Tobacco Use – Low/Moderate/High) X 2 (Message Type – Attack/Blame) X 2 (MSV – Low/High) repeated measures experimental design to examine what type of anti-tobacco message (i.e., Blame vs. Attack) and sensation levels would influence attitudes, behaviors, and emotional responses of individuals with differing levels of tobacco use (TU). The study was concerned with creation of tobacco prevention and cessation messages for those most likely to currently smoke or smoke in the future. Findings suggest that High MSV Attack messages are superior to Low MSV and Blame messages in terms of Aad, behavioral intent, and coactive emotional response. This indicates that attitudes and behaviors are more greatly influenced by messages that make high/moderate smokers out to be the victim of tobacco company manipulations. This research is important in understanding what messages are most likely to increase attention and encoding for those audience members most at risk for smoking behaviors.

2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 186 words || 
Info
5. Williams, Francis. "Adolescent Tobacco Use: The Role of Tobacco Litigation on Cessation vs. Prevention." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117033_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Smoking has been identified as the single most preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Approximately 50 million Americans smoke. Nearly 3 million United States teenagers smoke. Approximately 3,000 teenagers a day become regular smokers and one-third of them will die prematurely of a smoking-related disease (USDHHS 1990). Adolescent tobacco use and the subsequent health problems are a major concern in American society. The Institute of Medicine has declared tobacco use a pediatric epidemic. Ninety percent of regular smokers begin before the age of 19 and 60 percent begin before the age of 14 (USDHHS 1989). Public health officials agree that abstinence from using tobacco products is the best policy. Given the prevalence of tobacco use by adolescents how does cessation or reduction programs measure up against prevention programs? This paper examines the current philosophies behind adolescent tobacco cessation and reduction programs versus prevention programs. In addition it examines how the recent tobacco litigation settlement focuses attention on the role of law in abetting the cessation vs. prevention debate.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 54 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy