Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,355 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 471 - Next  Jump:
2012 - AECT International Convention Words: 74 words || 
Info
1. Xu, Shuya., Kou, Xiaojing. and Bonk, Curtis. "Feature Analysis of Online Vocabulary Learning Tools: An Annotated Tool Box" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, The Galt House, Louisville, KY, Oct 30, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575286_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study uses feature analysis method to examine 34 language teaching sites (identified in an earlier study) to find out the tools and the pedagogies that are being used for online vocabulary learning. Initial findings include four basic areas of online vocabulary learning, and a list of learning tools that belong to these areas. Initial findings show an emergent focus on social constructivist approach of vocabulary learning and an increasing emphasis on communicative competence.

2013 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 211 words || 
Info
2. Meyers, Duncan., Wandersman, Abraham. and Castellow, Jennifer. "The Quality Implementation Tool: A practical tool communities can use to strengthen implementation quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p653100_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Quality Implementation Tool (QIT) is a synthesis and translation of research literature on the specific actions (i.e., the “how to”) that can be employed to foster high quality implementation (i.e., putting an innovation into practice in a way that meets the necessary standards to achieve the innovation’s desired outcomes). By focusing on the “how to” of implementation, the QIT is meant to provide practitioners, consultants, researchers, program designers, and funders with practical strategies to improve implementation. The tool can be used by these stakeholders to help proactively plan and monitor systematic quality implementation, and it suggests future directions for research. This presentation will discuss the six components that comprise the QIT, how they were developed from an extensive synthesis of the implementation research literature (Meyers, Durlak, & Wandersman, 2012), and describe how it can be used as a consultation tool to guide planning, monitoring and evaluating implementation.

Meyers, D. C., Durlak, J. A., & Wandersman, A. (2012). The Quality Implementation Framework: A synthesis of critical steps in the implementation process. American Journal of Community Psychology, 50(3-4), 462-480.

Meyers, D. C., Katz, J., Chien, V., Wandersman, A., Scaccia, J. P., & Wright, A. (2012). Practical implementation science: Developing and piloting the Quality Implementation Tool. American Journal of Community Psychology, 50(3-4), 481-496.

2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 134 words || 
Info
3. Flett, Jason. "Digital Tools in Qualitative Research: A Survey of Digital Tools Employed by Today’s Qualitative Researchers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p989835_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Today qualitative researchers have access to an ever-expanding collection of digital tools. While conventional Qualitative Data Analysis (QDA) software has been widely explored in the literature, little has been written about these newer tools that sit outside its traditional boundaries. This presentation attempts to address the gap by exploring the applications that are available, including how they are being employed, their impacts on the research process and what potential they might have on reshaping methods in the future. This presentation will report on the findings of a customer survey conducted by QSR International where 3168 qualitative researchers responded about the digital tools they are using to assist with their research, highlighting the mix of traditional qualitative research tools, new emerging tools, and those that have been creatively re-purposed by the researchers for their needs.

2015 - Accelerate Learning: Racing into the Future - AECT Words: 75 words || 
Info
4. Giacumo, Lisa. and Conley, Quincy. "E-Learning authoring tools: How do e-learning developers gain competency using and selecting appropriate multimedia development tools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Accelerate Learning: Racing into the Future - AECT, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, Indiana, Nov 03, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1017976_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This interactive session includes the results for a pilot study about how novice to experienced course designers and developers gain authoring tool competency and select e-learning software for project needs. This primary research includes quantitative and qualitative survey data analyzed from Likert and open-ended questions, as well as a follow up interview. The findings and discussion of this ongoing work will be beneficial for individuals learning or supporting others’ competency development in e-learning authoring tools.

2015 - 4S Annual Meeting – Denver Words: 231 words || 
Info
5. Didziokaite, Gabija. "‘It's a good tool, but it's just a tool’: Negotiating mobile calorie counting with MyFitnessPal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting – Denver, Sheraton Downtown, Denver, CO, Nov 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1033127_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper reports findings from of a qualitative study of MyFitnessPal, which aims to explore how users use this mobile app and how it affects their behaviour.
While self-tracking in general, and calorie counting in particular, are not new phenomena, MyFitnessPal, expands and enriches these practices. MyFitnessPal eases calorie counting by providing a vast food database, barcode scanning and ever-present tracking through mobile app. Unlike traditional calorie counting, MyFitnessPal does not focus solely on calories, but also provides extensive information and tracking of macro and micro nutrition.
Preliminary findings suggest that use of the app is substantially guided by nutritional and health knowledge already held by the users. Users often modify predefined calorie and macro nutrient goals, preferring to rely on their knowledge and experience rather than on, what they see as, generic rules. They rarely add their exercises, i.e. calories burned, into the calorie count, because MyFitnessPal, while great for consumed calories, is seen as too imprecise for calculating burned calories. Likewise, though users’ calorie counting is enclosed in single day timeframe given by MyFitnessPal, in practice it extends to single or several weeks. Thus, users are not using the technology blindly, but rather continuously negotiate between the guidelines and affordances of the app, and their health and fitness knowledge and goals. This paper explores these negotiations, what knowledge they are governed by and what effect they have on user’s daily choices.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 471 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy