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2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Liang, Jingwen. "Mediated Feeling Toward a Foreign Country: Investigating the Effects of Media Reception on Mainland Chinese Individuals' Stereotypes and Emotions Toward the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1362818_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Contextualized in mainland Chinese individuals' responses to the United States, this study investigated the effects of media reception on audiences' stereotypes and emotions in international relations. Drawing on a random sample of university students in mainland China, a survey was conducted to assess the respondents' news consumption, their received media tones on the foreign-policy and nonforeign-policy issues related to the United States, and their stereotypes and emotional responses toward the country. The findings demonstrated that received media tones on different issues significantly predicted perceived stereotypes. It also found that media reception had indirect effects on intergroup emotions via the channel of cognitive appraisal of stereotypes.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 47 pages || Words: 10993 words || 
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2. Chung, Sungeun., Waks, Leah., Meffert, Michael., Velazquez, Ana. and Waheed, Moniza. "When My Favorite Candidate Opposes My Favorite Position on an Issue: The Effect of Incongruent Messages on Attitude Change Toward the Issue and Toward the Source" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233802_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Abstract: The present study analyzes the effect of persuasive communication both on attitudes toward the issue and attitudes toward the source, particularly in political communication context. Based on the cognitive dissonance theory and motivated information processing, it is expected that when responding to incongruent messages, voters with strong party identification show less attitude change toward the candidates but greater attitude change toward the issue than voters with weak party identification (H1); the stronger initial issue position, the less attitude change toward the issue, but the greater attitude change toward the candidates (H2); voters with strong party identification and strong initial issue position will show a greater variation for both attitudes toward the candidates and toward the issue (H4). To test hypotheses, incongruent information about gun control (Study 1) and abortion (Study 2) is presented based on party identification and initial issue position. Attitudes toward the candidates and attitude toward the issue are measured after message exposure. Data collection will be completed by November 6, 2007.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 245 words || 
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3. Gegout, Catherine. "Towards a NATOisation of European Foreign Policy towards Africa?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180360_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: EU?s first mission in Africa was in 2003, when Artemis intervened in the Democratic Republic of Congo in order to help the UN MONUC mission restore order in Bunia. EU states have agreed to send EU troops to Kinshasa to support MONUC during the June 2006 elections. NATO officials have been discussing security issues with the Mauritanian government since 2004. Both Western organisations are logistically helping the African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS). These missions seem to overlap, and they can be considered as ?low-scale? missions as they are limited in time, number of troops and mandate.The research question this paper will answer is the following: how and under which conditions do EU and NATO member states agree to launch missions to Africa? The paper will be divided into two sections: first, it will look at the capabilities of each international actor, and examine how and to what extent these actors can intervene. Second, it will study the interaction between the officials in both organisations, and will determine the reasons for either an EU or a NATO intervention.This paper will use a realist framework to explain the motives of international actors. They intervene when they have a strategic interest to do so, namely in order to fight terrorism. It will also be based on the concept of bandwagoning to analyse the interaction between Western actors. The paper will argue that the US is a key variable in understanding the type of mission sent to Africa.

2011 - The Law and Society Association Words: 275 words || 
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4. Sen, Maya. and Hochschild, Jennifer. "Toward the Unknown: Public Attitudes toward Biobanks and Genetic Forensic Technology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA, May 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p496838_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Genomics research will soon have a deep impact on many aspects of our lives, but its political implications and associations remain undeveloped. Our goal in this research project is to explore what Americans know and think about one small slice of the rapidly developing genomics arena: biobanks. Biobanks today are used to store, maintain, and make available genetic information -- both for scientific research and also for criminal and forensics purposes. Despite the increasing salience of biobanks in these two areas, and despite vocal elite opinion about the issue, the American public knows little about how biobanks operate and their potential impact. That the public is so unaware of the forensics use of biobanks is particular alarming given that racial and ethnic minorities (particularly African Americans) are strongly over-represented in terms of the genetic information stored.

In this study, we use a novel public opinion survey that specifically looks at public attitudes about biobanks. We explore four related questions. First, we examine general knowledge about biobanks: how well informed is the American public and what do they know? Second, we look at the relationship between ascriptive characteristics -- race, gender, and age -- and moral approval (or disapproval), ethical acceptance (or rejection), and cognitive trust (or skepticism) of biobanks. Third, we look at the correlation between these feelings toward biobanks and certain value predispositions, in particular ideology and religiosity. Lastly, we leverage the fact that similarly worded surveys have been asked in other countries (particularly in the U.K.) to draw some cross-national comparisons about the issue. The end result is one of the first glimpses into a quickly developing field.

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