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2007 - North American Association For Environmental Education Words: 42 words || 
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1. Korniczky, Lari. and Chun, Bo Ae. "Home Town Ecology: Student Scientists Team with Town Planners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Association For Environmental Education, Virginia Beach Convention Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia, Nov 13, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p188384_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster Sessions
Abstract: Student scientists learned how they could become involved in the town planning process while carrying out National and State Science Objectives by developing a plan to monitor water quality in their community using GIS software. Come see their mapped results.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Words: 36 words || 
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2. Doyle, Jeffrey. "Impact of Education on Small Towns: The Political Impact of Government Laboratories on Small Towns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p268961_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The political impact of government laboratories on small towns has not been fully explored in the field of political science. This paper seeks to fill that void by exploring the political impact of the government laboratories.

2010 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 272 words || 
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3. Holt, Dominique. "New Town: Why Did Greensburg, Kansas Decide to Rebuild the Town Green After the Tornado?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 12, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p484174_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research investigates the process of organization and decision-making that led to Greensburg, Kansas adopting a Master Plan to rebuild their community “Green” after an EF5 tornado destroyed 95 percent of their town on May 4, 2007. The Master Plan, an action oriented menu of key projects intended to use for making critical funding and resource allocation decisions, serves as a reference for the community as it rebuilds. The Master Plan recommends the implementation of eco-friendly architecture and community design principles, as well as the usage of new eco-friendly technologies and building materials. When completed, it is intended to transform Greensburg into a model eco-community, indeed, one of the Greenest communities in the world. This study is based on a close textual reading of accounts and editorials in regional newspapers, including the Wichita Eagle, Hutchinson New, Kiowa County Signal, as well as relevant national media coverage from 2007 to the present from a variety of journalistic sources. It also relies on Greensburg City Council minutes that documented discussions, negotiations, and developments within city government and the community that led to the formation and eventual approval of the Master Plan by the City Council. By providing information about the important factors within the organization and decision-making process that led to Greensburg adopting a rebuilding plan focused on environmental sustainability, the results of the research will provide practical knowledge for disaster recovery experts and policy makers, as well as other communities who seek to strategically rebuild following a disaster. The results may also provide valuable information for communities that wish to make their towns more environmentally friendly.

2013 - ARNOVA Annual Conference Words: 100 words || 
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4. Paarlberg, Laurie., Nesbit, Rebecca., Clerkin, Richard. and Christensen, Robert. "Boom Towns or Bane Towns: The Impacts of Significant Community Growth on the Nonprofit Sector" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA Annual Conference, Marriott Hartford Downtown, Hartford, CT, Nov 21, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p668815_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In an era when community leaders and scholars worry about how demographic change affects civic engagement, social capital and civil society, we explore how rapid population changes affect the size and structure of the local nonprofit sector. Specifically we model the shifts in retirement, military, and immigrant populations in relation to the size/composition of nonprofit organizations. We also account for civic engagement as a potential moderating or mediating influence. Understanding the relationship between in-migration, civic engagement and the nonprofit sector provide a foundation to help community leaders to help assimilate newcomers in ways that build local civil society.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Wenzel, Andrea. "Red State, Purple Town: Polarized Communities and Local Journalism in Rural and Small-Town Kentucky" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1359043_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As the United States grapples with increasingly partisan media and affective polarization, how do cultural and political fault lines filter into residents’ daily lives, and how are they navigated? This case study of a region within a red state uses a communication infrastructure theory framework to examine how this political context affects residents’ relationships with media and their larger community storytelling networks. Through a series of focus groups, story diaries, and interviews with residents and local journalists, it explores whether shared communication resources remain and the potential for creating spaces for dialogue across political and demographic divides. Findings illustrate how residents negotiate interpersonal relationships, community spaces, and local and national media in a polarized communication context. The study highlights the importance of recognizing place-based identities and media representations to facilitate trust in journalism, and points to possible responses for local news and community engagement.

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