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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 9140 words || 
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1. Deil-Amen, Regina. "Do Traditional Models of College Dropout Apply to Non-Traditional Students at Non-Traditional Colleges?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22512_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper utilizes NCESÂ’s Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:96/01) to examine the factors that contribute to dropout by testing the applicability of existing models of college dropout on separate samples of two-year and four-year college students. The BPS data set is more representative of the heterogeneity of post-secondary students than high school cohort data sets. Findings reveal that traditional mechanisms of social integration may be less salient at community colleges, while students who are enrolled full-time, participate in study groups, and have more frequent interaction with faculty and advisors are much less likely to dropout. These factors help explain why students who attend private two-year colleges are less likely to dropout. While traditional models are useful for explaining why older, non-traditional age students are at-risk of dropping out when they begin at two-year colleges, the models do not explain why older students are more likely to drop out at four-year colleges, even when studentsÂ’ initial goals, aspirations, and external work and family obligations are taken into account. Furthermore, taking remedial courses has one of the largest influences on the likelihood that students will drop out at two-year but not four-year colleges.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 177 words || 
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2. Taylor, Melanie. "Crowding and Juvenile Misconduct: A Comparison of Traditional and Non-Traditional Juvenile Correctional Institutions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432681_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study explores the relationship between levels of crowding in juvenile correctional facilities and institutional juvenile misconduct. Previous research has shown that there is a positive relationship between crowding and inmate stress and misconduct in adult facilities. Crowding in traditional juvenile facilities (e.g. juvenile halls) and non-traditional settings (e.g. forestry camps, boot camps) has been studied to a much lesser extent, yet are equally important. To explore the relationship between crowding and institutional disorder, correctional facilities from 124 California counties were analyzed. Public data obtained from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) (1999 to 2008) for assault rates on staff, escapes, attempted suicides, and completed suicides were used as indicators of misconduct, while the average daily population compared with the rated capacity of the institution was used to measure crowding. Although public data from the CDCR was extremely limited in the extent of information that was available, the current study provides a first step at exploring how crowding is related to violence in traditional and non-traditional juvenile correctional facilities.

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