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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 9140 words || 
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1. Deil-Amen, Regina. "Do Traditional Models of College Dropout Apply to Non-Traditional Students at Non-Traditional Colleges?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22512_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper utilizes NCES’s Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:96/01) to examine the factors that contribute to dropout by testing the applicability of existing models of college dropout on separate samples of two-year and four-year college students. The BPS data set is more representative of the heterogeneity of post-secondary students than high school cohort data sets. Findings reveal that traditional mechanisms of social integration may be less salient at community colleges, while students who are enrolled full-time, participate in study groups, and have more frequent interaction with faculty and advisors are much less likely to dropout. These factors help explain why students who attend private two-year colleges are less likely to dropout. While traditional models are useful for explaining why older, non-traditional age students are at-risk of dropping out when they begin at two-year colleges, the models do not explain why older students are more likely to drop out at four-year colleges, even when students’ initial goals, aspirations, and external work and family obligations are taken into account. Furthermore, taking remedial courses has one of the largest influences on the likelihood that students will drop out at two-year but not four-year colleges.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 139 words || 
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2. Leckey, Robert. "Harmonization or Improvisation? Encounters of Language and Legal Traditions [Harmonisation ou Improvisation? Rencontres à Travers des Langues et des Traditions Juridiques]" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235952_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In recognition of the different languages of law and different legal traditions operative on its territory, the federal government of Canada has undertaken a program of harmonization. It attempts to speak law in both official languages and to enact federal laws that speak to both common law and civil law. This paper underscores the metaphorical character of the idea of harmonization, challenging some of the assumptions underlying its appropriation by jurists. Examining instances of supposed harmonization and a critical musicological literature, the paper suggests that the processes evident as federal law attempts to extend its reach across the diverse provinces are perhaps better viewed as ones of improvisation. The metaphor of improvisation brings into sight the unpredictability and performativity of cross-linguistic and cross-tradition encounters, while acknowledging the extent to which such encounters are always embedded in practices and conventions.

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