Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 554 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 111 - Next  Jump:
2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Aaldering, Loes. and Lecheler, Sophie. "Trick of the Traits: An Experimental Study on the Impact of Trait Ownership on Mediated Leader Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350380_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study tests, by means of two large-scale survey experiments, how leader perceptions are affected by media portrayals of party leaders in terms of their leadership traits, and to what extent partisan stereotypes moderate this relationship.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8332 words || 
Info
2. Schneider, Frank., Otto, Lukas., Alings, Daniel. and Schmitt, Manfred. "Measuring Traits and States in Public Opinion Research: A Latent State–Trait Analysis of Political Efficacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p637187_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although the distinction between traits and states is as old as thinking about human behavior and public opinion research has always been interested in studying the effects of specific events, a wide range of variables are understood as stable dispositions. Latent state–trait (LST) theory (LSTT) considers the fact that measurement does not take place in a situational vacuum. LSTT decomposes any observed variable into a latent state component and a measurement error component, and any latent state into a latent trait component and a latent state residual representing situational influence. Moreover, precise estimates of reliability are available. After introducing LSTT, we apply LST models to panel data on political efficacy from 2009 German Longitudinal Election Study. Our findings corroborate the notion that internal efficacy is a rather traitlike disposition and external efficacy is significantly due to situational and/or interactional influences.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Jones, Colin. "Candidate Trait Assessments: Explaining Trait Defection in American Presidential Elections." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1349327_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The focus of this paper is on voters we identify as “trait defectors.” Utilizing data from the 2016 ANES, we develop models which predict the likelihood of trait defection in the 2016 presidential election.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 8830 words || 
Info
4. Hayes, Danny. "Trait Ownership and Trait Effects in U.S. Senate Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210481_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Despite the common claim that candidate personality plays a role in non-presidential elections, existing research has not convincingly demonstrated this to be true. Using new data from the 2006 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, I examine the effects of candidate traits in U.S. Senate elections. Testing the theory of “trait ownership,” I find some evidence of partisan stereotyping of candidates’ personal attributes, and strong evidence that trait perceptions affect candidate evaluation. As in presidential campaigns, the results also suggest senate candidates have an incentive to “trespass” on their opponent’s trait territory. In demonstrating the importance of personality, the findings show that scholars need to account for the effect of trait perceptions on candidate evaluation and vote choice, even in sub-presidential contests.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 172 words || 
Info
5. FitzGerald, Cathal. and Van Esch, Femke. "Trait, State, or Source? A Methodological Reflection on Leadership Trait Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241561_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Studies show that in addition to contextual factors, the personal disposition of political leaders affects their decision-making. To establish general patterns of how, where and when this is the case, scholars need a valid method to establish these traits. The Leadership Trait Analysis (LTA) technique has the potential to provide such a method. A literature review shows, however, that three core methodological questions remain which limit the LTA’s potential: Does LTA measure stable traits, or reveal leaders’ variable state of mind? Do contextual variables like political role or external circumstance influence LTA scores? And, do the different public sources result in similar scores? To explore these questions, the LTA scores of the Irish and British Prime Ministers Cowen and Brown were studied. Our results support the view that the LTA reveals the temporary state of mind of leaders; that certain trait scores are significantly affected by a leader's role; that external events may account for some differences in trait scores, and; that source can have a significant impact on leaders' LTA results.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 111 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy