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2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 47 pages || Words: 13227 words || 
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1. Bensimon, Estela., Dowd, Alicia. and Davila, Brianne. "Dimensions of the “Transfer Choice” Gap: Experiences of Latina and Latino Students Who Navigated Transfer Pathways" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p308086_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper draws on the voices of Latina and Latino students who navigated community college to four-year college transfer pathways to document a higher education problem we refer to as the “transfer choice” gap. This gap is the difference between the number of community college students who qualify to transfer to highly selective institutions and those who actually do. We document the “transfer choice” gap through a mixed methods action research study (Bensimon, Polkinghorne, Bauman, & Vallejo, 2004; Greenwood & Levin, 2005; Kemmis & McTaggart, 2000; Noffke, 1997; Reason, 1994) involving students and their college advisors at a community college in Southern California, which is designated as an Hispanic Serving Institution. Findings reveal the role of cultural, relational and financial factors that contribute to the “choice” gap. Findings also reveal that successful transfer depends on students’ know-how about the process, which is influenced by peer groups and the culture of Honors programs.

2014 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 213 words || 
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2. Thompson, Ryan. "Familial Attitudinal Transference Revisited: The Transference of Concrete and Abstract Political Attitudes Between Same- and Opposite-Sex Parent-Child Dyads" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Ergife Palace Hotel, Rome, Italy, Jul 04, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726924_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Funnel of Causality is a metaphysical concept that encompasses voting behavior in the American electorate. The funnel takes all of our experiences, behaviors, and attitudes and throws them together with issues and candidates into a single moment in time when we cast a vote (Campbell et al. 1960; Lewis-Beck et al. 2008). Attitudinal transference takes place between parents and children and those political attitudes that are more "concrete" (e.g., party identification) transfer more readily than "abstract" attitudes (Jennings & Niemi 1968, 1991;
Jennings et al. 2009). In addition, lack of cue-giving and object saliency leave attitudinal holes for children to fill elsewhere; meaning that parents who act upon their attitudes (cues) or those objects about which they are more passionate/knowledgeable (salience) will be the attitudes that children internalize more readily. Children from highly politicized homes are substantially more likely to carry on political dispositions than their less politicized counterparts (Beck & Jennings 1979). Parental salience of the political object and/or attitude in conjunction with the child’s perceptual accuracy of those attitudinal positions are indicative of successful attitudinal transference (Acock & Bengston 1980; Percheron & Jennings 1981; Tedin 1980). I focus on an area that receives very little coverage in the preceding research — parent-child sex match as it pertains to attitudinal transference.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 192 words || 
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3. Graham, William. "‘Backflow of Policy Transfer’ A Case Study- International Criminal Justice Policy Transfer in Violence Reduction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030349_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Glasgow has long experienced the issue of gang-related violence, especially in the east end of the city, an area of high social deprivation and related problems. It was against this backdrop that in 2007 agencies in Glasgow looked for new ideas to tackle gang-related violence, and decided to replicate the Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence (US CIRV). The Glasgow agencies engaged in a process of policy transfer, forming a multi-agency strategy, the Community Initiative to Reduce Violence (Glasgow CIRV), in order to tackle violence by targeting gangs and gang members both collectively and individually.
This paper discusses the policy transfer of the criminal justice programme between US CIRV and Glasgow CIRV and examines in detail a key finding of this research, an instance of ‘backflow of policy transfer’, whereby the operating practices in Glasgow CIRV were ultimately adopted by US CIRV, a phenomenon not apparently documented before in the field of international criminal justice policy transfer. Glasgow CIRV operated for a period of three years (June 2008- July 2011), with some degree of success; however, in contrast to US CIRV, which is still in operation, it failed to achieve long-term sustainability.

2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 427 words || 
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4. Kurlychek, Megan. "Does Mode of Transfer Impact Adult Court Sentencing Outcomes for Transferred Juveniles? An Inter-Jurisdictional Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559073_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the most profound developments in the recent evolution of juvenile justice has been the expanded use of adult criminal courts to process young offenders. For example, in the wake of rising juvenile violence in America in the 1980’s and 1990’s, virtually every state passed legislation to either create new mechanisms to transfer youth to adult court or to redefine the jurisdictional boundaries of the juvenile court thereby excluding broad classes of youth from its authority. As a result, juvenile transfers to adult court in America increased by 400 percent during the 1980s and the number of state prison admissions of youth under the age of 18 more than doubled.
Gaining a better understanding of the various waiver/transfer processes employed as well as the resulting justice outcomes for youth is important for several key reasons. First, while there is much rhetoric about whether processing juveniles as adults is “good” or “bad,” there has been surprisingly little scientific analysis of how these various policies “on the books” are played out in the real world court context. Moreover, given the array of transfer mechanisms utilized it is feasible that different policies result in vastly different outcomes. For example, prosecutorial waiver mechanisms enacted in 15 states remove the discretionary transfer decision from the hands of the juvenile court judge and place it instead within the venue of the prosecutor. Similarly, expanded statutory exclusion provisions further limit the discretion of the juvenile court judge. Questions of the desirability of juvenile transfer policies are thus inherently intertwined with the much larger debate regarding discretionary decision-making and the relative power of various justice system actors. In addition to the source of discretion, a scholarly dialogue exists concerning those factors that ultimately influence justice system outcomes through the application of discretion. Pressing questions here surround the proposed relevance of legal factors, extra-legal factors, and organizational dynamics.
The current study is designed to address these pressing issues by providing one of the first inter-jurisdictional studies of this phenomenon. Made possible through a grant from the Law and Social Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation, this research compiled data for a three-year time period (2004 – 2006) for six states which represent the various regions of the United States as well as the different modes of transfer to adult court. Results suggest that mode of transfer has a direct effect on criminal court sentencing outcomes and that these effects are further conditioned by various legal and extra-legal characteristics of the offense and offender.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 203 words || 
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5. Taylor, Melanie. "Juvenile Court Transfers: Influence of Transfer Mechanisms on Sentence Severity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517549_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Currently all states allow for juveniles to be transferred to adult court for serious and violent offenses (Griffin, Torbet, and Syzmanski, 1998). Differing mechanisms of transfer, including: judicial waivers, direct files (i.e. prosecutor requests transfer), statutory exclusions, or some combination of the three, are present in each state. Few studies have explored sentencing outcomes based upon this crucial point in the transfer process; however those that have suggest that sentencing disparities occur as a result of the method by which the juvenile was waived to adult court. More specifically, limited research based upon a small sample of transfers suggests that statutory transfers result in worse outcomes for juveniles when compared with the other two mechanisms (Steiner, 2005). It is hypothesized that juveniles transferred as a result of a statutory exclusion will be punished more punitively, as judges may perceive statutory exclusion laws as being reflective of community beliefs. The current study expands upon the findings of Steiner and Rainville (2008) by exploring transfer mechanisms in 40 counties and discusses how decisions early on in processing influence sentencing outcomes, including sentence type (i.e. fine, probation, jail, or prison) and final sentence severity. Implications for policy will be discussed.

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