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2008 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 61 words || 
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1. dai, yilin. "Using Wavelet-transforms to Improve Power for Linkage Disequilibrium >> MappingUsing Wavelet-transforms to Improve Power for Linkage Disequilibrium Using Wavelet-transforms to Improve Power for Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, TBA, Madison, Wisconsin, Jul 28, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275358_index.html>
Publication Type: Graduate Student Paper
Abstract: We develop a powerful novel statistical method to identify genetic variants related to disease..
The new method uses wavelet-transforms on genotypes, with minimal degrees of freedom, to construct a weighted test statistic which captures significant information from multiple gene loci.Simulation is used to compare the power of the new procedure to existing, less general methods. The new statistic has significantly improved power.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Vander Heyden, Karin., Huizinga, Mariëtte., Kan, Kees-Jan. and Jolles, Jelle. "Spatial Reasoning Development During the Middle School Years: Dissociating Object Transformations from Viewer Transformations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958090_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is convincing evidence that spatial reasoning is not a unitary construct, but consists of separate and independent functions and abilities. Studies with adults distinguish between two main types of mental spatial transformations: object and viewer transformations (e.g., Hegarty & Waller, 2004). The main goal of the current paper was to examine whether this view of separate spatial functions in adults is applicable to the development of spatial reasoning in children, using the intrinsic-extrinsic/static-dynamic framework advanced by Newcombe and Shipley (2012).
This framework includes two dichotomous factors. The intrinsic-extrinsic factor distinguishes intrinsic spatial information (characteristics of a single object) from extrinsic information (characteristics of a group of objects). The static-dynamic factor distinguishes thinking about stationary versus moving (groups of) objects. Combining the intrinsic-extrinsic with the static-dynamic dimension yields a 2 x 2 model of spatial skills, with each quadrant representing a specific kind of spatial reasoning (see Table 1). An important question we wanted to answer is whether this distinction between different types of reasoning can be found in the spatial development of children.
231 children from grade 3 to 6 (110 boys, 121 girls; M age = 9.96, SD = 1.20) performed at three well-known intrinsic-dynamic tasks (i.e., object transformations: Mental Rotation test, Paper Folding test, and WISC Block Design) and two newly developed extrinsic tasks (i.e., viewer transformations, perspective change to a group of objects). The Eye Spy task required children to construct a layout of objects from a 180°-rotated perspective. The City Walk task required children to walk routes through a layout of blocks from 180°- and 90°- rotated perspectives. Four age groups were compared: 8-, 9-, 10- and 11-year-olds.
Developmental progress was seen on all tasks. Especially the extrinsic tasks led to large individual differences and appeared to be difficult for many children, with only two third of 11-year-old children succeeding on the easy trials. On construct level, the observed patterns of variance in children’s performance were examined using a latent factor approach. In the best fitting model, intrinsic-dynamic reasoning could be separated from extrinsic-static and extrinsic-dynamic reasoning. Nevertheless, the different skills were strongly interrelated, especially intrinsic-dynamic and extrinsic-dynamic reasoning (r = .84). This suggests that shared processes underlie object and viewer transformations. One option is that children used the same spatial strategies to solve the object and viewer transformation problems. Alternatively, we hypothesize that individual differences in other cognitive domains, such as working memory, may strongly determine how successful a child is in both types of transformations. Results of a model with working memory (as measured with a Mental counters task) included as covariate (see Figure 1), showed indeed a smaller correlation between intrinsic-dynamic and extrinsic-dynamic reasoning (r = .79) when controlling for these individual differences.
Altogether, we propose that already in children under twelve years of age different spatial skills can be distinguished. Object transformations may require different computational processes than viewer transformations. However, the strong interrelations suggest that many common processes underlie these abilities and may explain individual differences, such as working memory.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 132 words || 
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3. Rasmussen, Mikkel. "Transformation as Culture: Military Transformation, Strategic Culture and Risk" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253076_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The paper seeks to analyse military transformation as a certain cultural phenomenon, which creates a practice of transformation. This practice determines the way in which Western military forces are organised, the doctrines that are developed and, most importantly, the way in which Western military forces use these new technologies. The paper discusses different approaches to the study of strategic culture, arguing in favour of a practice-based approach. It then goes on analysing the way in which military transformation and the Global War on Terror are shaped by different notions of how warfare and the Armed forces are being transformed. This especially pertains to the Iraq campaign in 2003. The paper argues that this development leads to different risk cultures when it comes to dealing with military transformation, as well as with combat.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 45 pages || Words: 15215 words || 
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4. Farrell, Theo. "Transformation and Counter-Transformation in the British Army" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253265_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper presents research findings on the British Army case study from a two year ESRC funded project on land forces transformation in the US, Britain and France. In the post-Cold War period all three armies have been confronted with a number of challenges as they have sought to adapt and innovate in the face of the alteration of the political, social. strategic and military environment, as well of the increasingly introduction of new technologies, particularly information technologies, and societal changes. The British Army’s innovation efforts have been shaped by a perceived operational need to be more expeditionary in character and to develop new concepts consistent with the concepts of Network Enabled Operations and Effects Based Approach to Operations that have their origins with, respectively, US Navy and the US Air Force. A critical aspect of the British Army’s effort to respond to these issues is the Future Rapid Effects System, a radical rethinking of the organization of Army units designed to make one third of its combat capability more expeditionary while still sustaining combat lethality and survivability. This analysis examines for what has driven the British Army to rethink the character of its combat platforms and organizational structure, the factors which conditioned the alternative choices it perceived it had and the choices it ultimately took, and the relevant factors, such as organizational culture that have facilitated or inhibited innovation or change.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 2 pages || Words: 416 words || 
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5. Terriff, Terry. "Transformation and Counter-Transformation in the US Army" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253266_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper present research findings from the US Army case study from a two year ESRC funded project on land forces transformation. In the post-Cold War period the US Army has been confronted by a number of challenges as it has sought to adapt and innovate in the face of the alteration of the political, social. strategic and military environment, as well of the increasingly introduction of new technologies, particularly information technologies, and societal changes. The US Army’s innovation efforts have been shaped by a perceived operational need to be more expeditionary in character and to develop new concepts consistent with the concepts of Network Centric Warfare and Effects Based Operations that have their origins with, respectively, US Navy and the US Air Force. A critical aspect of the US Army’s effort to respond to these issues is the Future Combat System, a radical rethinking of the organization of Army units designed to make one third of its combat capability more expeditionary while still sustaining combat lethality and survivability, while subsequently it has moved to alter its basic organizational unit structure from that of ‘divisions’ to that of ‘brigades’. This analysis examines for what has driven the US Army to rethink the character of its combat platforms and organizational structure, the factors which conditioned the alternative choices it perceived it had and the choices it ultimately took, and the relevant factors, such as organizational culture that have facilitated or inhibited innovation or change.

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