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2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 163 words || 
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1. Sperber, Kimberly., Manzo, Amber. and Vissman, Aaron. "Examining the Intersection of Risk, Trauma, Health, and Perceptions of Trauma-Informed Care in Community Corrections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278868_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Justice involved individuals experience interpersonal trauma at significantly higher rates than the general population. Elevated rates of interpersonal trauma have been documented in both males and females involved in the justice system and have been associated with greater risk for a variety of poor health and legal outcomes. In addition, research has demonstrated an inverse relationship between complex PTSD symptomology and treatment retention and treatment outcomes for substance abusing clients. Finally, involvement in the criminal justice system can further exacerbate pre-existing trauma. Because of the varied and complex ways that prior trauma can impact the successful outcomes of correctional treatment clients, this study utilized a cross-sectional design of 400 halfway house clients to test the relationships between previous trauma, current substance use and mental health disorders, criminogenic risk, health status, and program retention and completion. This study also assesses the degree to which prior trauma impacts client perceptions of environmental characteristics important to trauma-informed care. Results and implications will be presented.

2009 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 298 words || 
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2. Adams, Linda., Marlotte, Lauren., Douroux, Ashley., Kane, Linda. and Krowel, April. "Trauma Resiliency Model: A Mind-Body Treatment Modality for Trauma Survivors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Montclair State University, Montclair, New Jersey, Jun 18, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302333_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cognitive behavior therapy or psychological first aid are both typical treatment modalities used in counseling trauma survivors. Until recently, most mental health professionals have focused on treatment modalities that address the cognitive, psychological and emotional mental health needs of trauma survivors. There are some less recognized treatment modalities that focus on the somatic experiencing of trauma. New evidence suggests that the Trauma Resiliency Model (TRM) may be a more effective means of treatment for the traumatized client than other treatment modalities. Following a traumatic event, it is not uncommon for survivors to remain in a heightened state of physiological arousal, which, if not quickly addressed, can lead to the onset of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma related disorders. TRM employs techniques to balance the autonomic nervous system thus reducing the potential for the occurrence of PTSD-related symptoms. Since 2004 TRM has successfully been used in a variety of settings and has anecdotally been found to be a promising, efficacious and innovative cross-cultural treatment modality, but until now the efficacy has not been assessed as a part of a research study. TRM has been used in Thailand, China, Kenya, Rwanda and the United States and anecdotally has been effective. TRM is taught to clients so the clients can utilize the technique on their own and is potentially beneficial within just a few sessions. This qualitative and quantitative study compares the use of TRM to cognitive behavior therapy and medication-only clients at a community counseling center in order to research the efficacy of this innovative treatment modality. To fill the gap in the literature regarding TRM, the County of San Bernardino Department of Behavioral Health, along with a research team from the University of La Verne, is undertaking a study of the efficacy of the model.

2011 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 205 words || 
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3. Gregory, Tara. and Young, Christine. "Trauma survivors' perspectives on trauma informed care" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, Jun 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503134_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research has consistently shown a strong connection between trauma and a mental health diagnosis. In recent years, Trauma Informed Care (TIC) has been presented as a valuable approach to ensuring that mental health consumers are treated respectfully and supportively by a wide range of providers and systems. Broad implementation of TIC across multiple systems is seen as a path to community change and transformation through reducing the re-traumatization of those who are often the most vulnerable. In Kansas, a number of organizations are currently working from different perspectives and arenas to make this broad implementation a reality. In an effort to gather stakeholder input and ideas regarding consistent elements of trauma, systemic contributors to re-traumatization, and potential ways to create systemic change through TIC, WSU's Center for Community Support and Research and a statewide Trauma Advisory Group (TAG) consisting of mental health consumers/trauma survivors and service providers collaborated to design, facilitate and analyze data from a series of focus groups across Kansas. These focus groups included persons with mental health diagnoses who were also trauma survivors and service providers, including Certfified Peer Specialists. The major themes identified by participants as well as information on the collaborative nature of this project will be presented.

2011 - 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 298 words || 
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4. McGriff, Aisha. "Healthy Trauma: Medical Experimentation as Acts of Trauma on Black Bodies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493210_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Human medical experimentation has been a relatively acceptable part of furthering the realm of medical knowledge. It can be argued that medical experimentation is a necessary evil in which possible harm to one has the potential to benefit many. Similarly, Diana Taylor argues that in certain instances torture is made acceptable because of the benefits to the greater good. However, it cannot be ignored that often the ones who undergo medical experimentation are part of oppressed groups. Thus the persons who are subjected to medical experimentation are most often people of color, immigrants, poor, institutionalized and/or children.
In this paper I argue that it should be acknowledged that human medical experimentation almost always includes trauma of the people used as subjects. In being bodies that have endured trauma, they are also bodies that have been tortured. From the perspective of the test subjects, the actions of medical experimentation are no longer scientific exploration, but rather torture. Considering these experiments on people in terms of the experiences of the individuals whose bodies are being used rather than from the perspective of those conducting the experiments forces a shift from a detached Foucauldian medical gaze to an embodied knowledge.
In doing so, there is also a shift from the body that is in a privileged position of power that is able to (re)create knowledge to a body which is subjugated and often barred from knowledge creation. Furthermore, interrogating medical experimentation from the vantage point of the test subjects helps to illuminate how black bodies are valued by highlighting the divide between human researcher and inhuman subject. Thus this paper is an exploration of disembodied and embodied knowledge as well as an interrogation of placing value on black bodies.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Moras, Amanda. and Ryan, Maura. "The Intersection of Vicarious Trauma and Personal Trauma Histories for Sexual Assault Crisis Workers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 09, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1249669_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To date a large body of research has documented both the prevalence of and consequences of sexual assault. While the effects of sexual assault have been well documented, more recently this research has begun to incorporate the experiences of those close to victims, such as significant others and support workers, suggesting that these individuals may experience “Vicarious Trauma” or “Secondary Traumatic Stress” through their proximity to the experience of sexual assault. Much of this research, however, has assumed separate constructs of vicarious or secondary trauma and personal trauma. Given the high rates of personal trauma experiences of sexual assault crisis advocates documented both in this research and elsewhere; this paper explores how in many regards secondary and primary trauma are intersecting experiences for advocates. Using both qualitative and quantitative data from 140 participants working in sexual assault crisis work, this research elaborates on how personal experiences of trauma may serve as an impetus to enter anti-violence work and how participants perceive their experiences of personal trauma affecting their relationships to the work and clients.

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