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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 223 words || 
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1. Kwan, Yvonne. "Latent Articulations of Trauma: Manifestations of Transgenerational Transmission of Trauma in Cambodian Americans" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1038694_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Social trauma, like that of the Khmer Rouge genocide and autogenocide, transcends time and space. It is the caesuras and interruptions of time that allow for the traumas of the past to intersect with the realities of the present. The traumas of the first generation are always present—although they may linger silently, hiding in the shadows of the past. Sometimes the younger generations are aware of how their family histories haunt them, but at other times, the latent traumas are merely articulated as mundane life activities. Latent articulations describe how personal, social, cultural, and transgenerational trauma are articulated (read: connected) but may remain hidden or concealed until certain circumstances or encounters allow for certain ghosts of the past, present, and future to swerve into a moment or moments of affective attachment. Using ethnographic and survey data, this presentation shows how the transmission of trauma is articulated (or expressed) as parental anger, neglect, overprotectiveness, and mistrust. Such manifestations coupled with the lived realities of multigenerational poverty and neighborhood violence reveal how the latent articulations of trauma transcend beyond individuals and specific families to impact larger trends present among the Cambodian American community. Because of the productive nature of trauma, trauma traces may manifest in many different ways, including not only gang participation and development of mental health challenges, but also community engagement and outreach.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Moras, Amanda. and Ryan, Maura. "The Intersection of Vicarious Trauma and Personal Trauma Histories for Sexual Assault Crisis Workers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 09, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1249669_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To date a large body of research has documented both the prevalence of and consequences of sexual assault. While the effects of sexual assault have been well documented, more recently this research has begun to incorporate the experiences of those close to victims, such as significant others and support workers, suggesting that these individuals may experience “Vicarious Trauma” or “Secondary Traumatic Stress” through their proximity to the experience of sexual assault. Much of this research, however, has assumed separate constructs of vicarious or secondary trauma and personal trauma. Given the high rates of personal trauma experiences of sexual assault crisis advocates documented both in this research and elsewhere; this paper explores how in many regards secondary and primary trauma are intersecting experiences for advocates. Using both qualitative and quantitative data from 140 participants working in sexual assault crisis work, this research elaborates on how personal experiences of trauma may serve as an impetus to enter anti-violence work and how participants perceive their experiences of personal trauma affecting their relationships to the work and clients.

2011 - 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 298 words || 
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3. McGriff, Aisha. "Healthy Trauma: Medical Experimentation as Acts of Trauma on Black Bodies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493210_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Human medical experimentation has been a relatively acceptable part of furthering the realm of medical knowledge. It can be argued that medical experimentation is a necessary evil in which possible harm to one has the potential to benefit many. Similarly, Diana Taylor argues that in certain instances torture is made acceptable because of the benefits to the greater good. However, it cannot be ignored that often the ones who undergo medical experimentation are part of oppressed groups. Thus the persons who are subjected to medical experimentation are most often people of color, immigrants, poor, institutionalized and/or children.
In this paper I argue that it should be acknowledged that human medical experimentation almost always includes trauma of the people used as subjects. In being bodies that have endured trauma, they are also bodies that have been tortured. From the perspective of the test subjects, the actions of medical experimentation are no longer scientific exploration, but rather torture. Considering these experiments on people in terms of the experiences of the individuals whose bodies are being used rather than from the perspective of those conducting the experiments forces a shift from a detached Foucauldian medical gaze to an embodied knowledge.
In doing so, there is also a shift from the body that is in a privileged position of power that is able to (re)create knowledge to a body which is subjugated and often barred from knowledge creation. Furthermore, interrogating medical experimentation from the vantage point of the test subjects helps to illuminate how black bodies are valued by highlighting the divide between human researcher and inhuman subject. Thus this paper is an exploration of disembodied and embodied knowledge as well as an interrogation of placing value on black bodies.

2018 - 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 126 words || 
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4. Mayor, Christine. "Teachers, Trauma, and the Classroom: Investigating Trauma Training for Working with Syrian Refugee Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1371323_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous research demonstrates the impact of traumatic exposure on refugee students' learning, with the school increasingly seen as an appropriate and necessary place for trauma identification and intervention. Yet, this research has often left out the classroom experiences of teachers, despite them spending the most time with students.

This qualitative study focuses on teachers’ experiences of applying trauma training to the classroom when teaching Syrian refugee children. This research highlights specific examples of how trauma “emerges” in the classroom, including data about what situations teachers continue to struggle with despite being given training. Implications for how social workers might support teachers in trauma-informed classrooms will be articulated, as well as the potential need to re-consider what content and through what method teachers are provided this training.

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