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2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 140 words || 
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1. Salahuddin, Mohammad. and Verma, Arvind. "Race and Ethnicity in the Context of Amnesty Decisions and the TRC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p200637_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although scholars interested in human rights and global issues of crime or justice have demonstrated substantial interest in the truth commission in general, and the TRC of South Africa in particular, very little evidence is available in the literature to account for the nature of crime and violence by non-white and non-black groups in the apartheid era. This paper is a preliminary attempt to understand the nature and extent of violence perpetrated by non-Africans (especially by Asians) in which I wish to analyze select amnesty cases through an examination of TRC’s amnesty hearings. In particular, I would like to compare and contrast the nature of violence, committed by individuals of Asian origin and non-African descent, with that of blacks and whites, and examine the patterns of case resolution as revealed through the proceedings of the TRC in post-apartheid South Africa.

2011 - The Law and Society Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8947 words || 
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2. Nagy, Rosemary. "Unsettling Peace and Justice? The Scope and Bounds of Transitional Justice and the Canadian TRC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA, May 30, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497642_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada was established as part of a negotiated settlement to a staggering number of survivor lawsuits over the damages inflicted upon Aboriginal peoples by the 100-year residential school system. Though the use of a truth commission in a settled democracy is in many ways at odds with the orthodoxy of transitional justice, I argue in this paper that the Canadian TRC provides an important opportunity for thinking normatively about the scope of transitional justice. This paper develops and responds to a growing strand of criticism about the bounding of transition as a legal-political, rather than social justice, enterprise that narrows on individual instances of gross human rights violations. Though it remains to be seen how the Canadian TRC will frame the physical and sexual abuse that occurred in the residential schools, many Aboriginal activists, scholars and survivors argue that the residential schools—and reconciliation—cannot be understood apart from colonization, land dispossession, and cultural genocide. Thinking through the structural critique, this paper analyzes the possibilities of truth as a victim-centered process and of reconciliation as a movement from the “bottom-up.” It asks how the Canadian TRC might decolonize prevailing conceptions of peace and justice in a “settled” democracy. It further locates the Canadian TRC internationally, asking whether it might unsettle prevailing constructions of truth, justice and reconciliation in paradigmatic transitions which too often pass over deep continuities in social inequality and structural violence, if not also colonialism.

2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 127 words || 
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3. Weisman, Richard. "Remorse and Social Reconstruction: Reflections of the TRC Commission Hearings in South Africa- 1996-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Building on earlier research, I use transcripts and video footage from the Truth and Reconciliation hearings to show how the selective encouragement of public expressions of remorse by persons in authority was deployed to redefine the boundaries of community during a period of rapid transition from Apartheid to post-Apartheid. My purpose is to show how through approval and disapproval, compliance with or resistance to the expectation of remorse, members negotiated the moral architecture of a newly emergent community. I argue that these processes in which courts and communities determine what actions require an expression of remorse and what actions do not- while more visible in moments of political and ideological transition- are part of the effortful construction of shared sentiments even in societies undergoing less marked discontinuity.

2014 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 12480 words || 
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4. Keil, Julie. "Liberia's TRC-The Road to Democracy and Rule of Law or a Dead End" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, The Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 09, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p697747_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract

After two massive civil wars Liberia’s warring sides signed a peace agreement in 2003 providing for, among other things, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to help it on the path to democracy and rule of law. After public hearings in all fifteen counties in Liberia and extensive input from Liberians out of the country, Liberia’s TRC concluded its proceedings in 2009 with recommendations for prosecution of war crimes and human rights abuses and lustration of many smaller offenders, including the current president of Liberia. This paper reviews the experiences of Liberia that led to the civil wars and the efforts since peace to transition to democracy and rule of law against the backdrop of the bigger question of whether TRCs assist states in making that transition or make it more difficult. Field research from 2011 in Liberia as well as various surveys of popular opinion, Polity IV and Freedom House data as well as other indexes relating to corruption and rule of law are utilized along with the TRC report and recommendations. This paper concludes that although Liberia has made some improvements in democracy and rule of law since 2003, the TRC has not been instrumental in bringing about a transition, partially due to a lack of political will in Liberia but also due to its failure to bring about a change in the conflict between the Americo-Liberian elites in Liberia and the indigenous population that led to the civil war.

2016 - Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference Words: 227 words || 
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5. Edelman Warrior, Carol. "Premature Reconciliation: Canada’s TRC, Unfinished Business, and Rhymes for Young Ghouls" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Conference, Ala Moana Hotel, Honolulu, Hawaii, <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105536_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: After more than 7,000 residential school survivor testimonies and millions of documents have been collected by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, the “truth” has been revealed, and now the country is focused on “reconciliation.” This paper demonstrates how traditional Indigenous stories featuring hallucination and uncontrollable consumption can help audiences understand why the film, Rhymes for Young Ghouls (2014) emphasizes “vengeance” rather than—or prior to—reconciliation. Indeed, the film echoes the values perpetuated in traditional stories concerned with the restoration of balance, since in the film, reconciliation does not present itself as a possibility until after the primary antagonist (a truant officer for the local residential school) is 1) humiliated by a group of young people that he has brutalized, 2) the children recuperate the property he has extorted, and, 3) the antagonist is killed by a residential school student, thus ending the truant officer’s dominance over the community. That is, although the horrific abuse suffered by First Nations students has been revealed through the TRC, and although exposing the abusive acts by the agents of church and state may be humiliating to the non-aboriginal citizens of Canada and its churches, contemporary aesthetic works like Rhymes for Young Ghouls suggest that the survivors and their descendants might not be ready for reconciliation until stolen property is returned, and the structures and systems of domination are dismantled.

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