Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 36 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  - Next
2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7553 words || 
Info
1. Ryan, Sarah. and Pfister, Damien. "Reclaiming Democracy through Rhetorical Resistance: A Tribute to Iris Marion Young" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p367409_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Rhetoricians wrestle with how to encourage robust and inclusive public deliberation. For decades, they have turned to feminist theory for insight into oppression and resistance. While forwarding compelling proposals such as invitational rhetoric, feminist deliberation scholars still grapple with how to encourage social group mobilization without essentializing group members. Iris Marion Young’s “seriality” provides a compelling answer. This tribute showcases what she can contribute to our field and why she is a colleague worth remembering.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 230 words || 
Info
2. Lai, Hui-min. "Tribute Furs from Tannu Tuva" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1077391_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In 1715, during the Kangxi reign, Tannu Tuva became a part of the Qing empire. The whole area of Tannu Tuva was divided into five banners, each administered by a jasagh. Subordinate to these high officials were company commanders and cavalry lieutenants. Every company commander was responsible for one hundred fifty households. In 1758, the Qianlong emperor instructed Tannu Tuva for tribute offerings and decided that every household in that region should provide three pieces of sable furs as annual tribute. To use sable furs as a value measure for other kinds of animal furs, three of lynx, otter, leopard pelts were equal to the value of one sable fur, and two of fox, wolf, kit fox, and ermine pelts were equivalent to the value of one sable fur. By comparison, forty squirrel pelts were the same value as one sable fur. In the tribute area of Tannu Tuva, the best hunting season lasted from September to October. During this time, animal furs were of the best quality, so it was also the period when most of the hunting took place. Those months were also the time of the most vigorous fur trade. But in the areas providing tribute furs the fur trade had to be postponed until all tribute furs were collected. Governing tribute furs and regulating the fur trade demonstrate the efficacy of Qing rule in Tannu Tuva.

2016 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Words: 138 words || 
Info
3. Hughes-Johnson, Samantha. "A Lasting Tribute to an Honorable Life: Obsequies and the Poveri Vergognosi in Quattrocento Florence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1050027_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Remembrance of the poor in general is often obscured by a lack of surviving written and visual evidence. The poveri vergognosi or shamed poor, being an intramural ethical abstraction operating within the boundaries set by poverty, are more resistant still to memorialisation. Accordingly, this interdisciplinary paper considers the Confraternity of the Buonomini di San Martino’s Burying the Dead fresco in tandem with fresh, unpublished archival data and literary sources. Through inter-textual analysis, the following issues are discussed: the extent to which the veil of poverty affected the shamed poor’s commemoration; whether the workshop of Domenico Ghirlandaio’s depiction of this final ritual was paradigmatic or realistic and finally, if it was, in fact, the lay sodality’s intention to advocate a visual testimonial to the recipients of their philanthropy, rather than simply illustrating their involvement in an act of charity.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 194 words || 
Info
4. Kim, Minkyu. "Reinforcing Chinese Suzerainty in the Late Nineteenth Century: Transforming the Tribute System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1189303_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: After the Opium Wars, Qing China, Meiji Japan, and Joseon Korea each concluded a ‘treaty’ that established diplomatic ties with Western states, following the Western system of that time. But when opening ports to trade within Northeast Asia, the term ‘treaty’ was replaced by ‘regulation’ or ‘agreement.’ The first time ‘treaty’ used among Northeast Asian countries was after Meiji Japan defeated the Qing in the Sino-Japanese War and subsequently, as a consequence, concluded the 1895 “Treaty of Shimonoseki.” How should we distinguish ‘regulation’ from ‘treaty’; what were the differences in meaning and nuance in international law; and did one word carry greater legal importance over the other? What were the political implications of the replacement of these terms by other words? How did the Qing respond to the challenge posed by the Western system of treaties in order to prolong or modify its traditional world order of investiture-tribute to maintain the Sino-centric world order? This study investigates these questions, and surveys, in a new perspective, the international order and relations of the three East Asian states that developed dynamically from the mid-nineteenth century, when the tribute system was replaced by the (Western) treaty system.

2019 - NAISA Words: 246 words || 
Info
5. Case, Pualani. "Kūkulu: A Tribute to the Pillars of Mauna Kea Strategies Exploring Land Repossession in Hawaiʻi" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NAISA, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand, Jun 26, 2019 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1486957_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What strategies are Indigenous communities using to protect, strengthen, or express their rights to land?

This question was posed to the kiaʻi, the protectors of Mauna Kea as part of a proposed study by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Grant awarded to PI Richmond from Western University in London, Ontario, Canada.

On March 10, 2018, Kūkulu; The Pillars of Mauna ā Wākea, opened its doors in Hāmākua, Hawaii.

Kūkulu is modeled after the slopes of Mauna Kea where the stance to protect the sacred mountain has taken place from 2014 to the present. It serves as a puʻu honua, sanctuary, a hālau, training center, and a kauhale, gathering place. The piko or foundational center of the exhibit space includes actual art pieces owned and utilized by the kiaʻi or protectors. Each step of creating the exhibit was executed with appropriate prayers, chants, offerings and protocols.

Kūkulu was created to bring the mountain to the masses, to be the connection of the mauna to the community, to inspire the keiki to kupuna to stand for the sacred, for the water, for the people.

This presentation will highlight the implementation of protocol in the installation of the exhibit and focuses on a Hawaiʻi case study showcasing how Kūkulu educates and inspires, sets a tone and vibration of how to stand for a sacred place and life ways and explores the question of how an exhibit directly impacts land repossession in Hawaiʻi.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8  - Next

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy