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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Suh, Hyungjun. and Reynolds-Stenson, Heidi. "General Trust or Outgroup Trust?: Trust and Social Movement Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119910_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous research finds that individuals who have greater trust in others are more likely to be politically active, both in terms of conventional political participation, such as voting, as well as unconventional, non-institutional forms of participation such as protest. Yet, researchers have failed to distinguish which forms of trust, or trust in whom, drive different forms of political participation. Furthermore, social movement scholars interested in micro-mobilization have given little attention to trust as determinant of protest participation. To begin to address these gaps, this article compares the effects of outgroup trust, ingroup trust, and general trust on social movement participation, specifically petition signing and peaceful demonstration attendance. Applying hierarchical logistic regression modeling to data from the World Values Survey 6th wave, we find that, in general, outgroup trust predicts individuals’ participation in these forms of protest much better than does general trust or ingroup trust, after controlling for other explanations of protest participation. In other words, it is specifically trust in others different from oneself, as opposed to trust in others in general or trust in others like oneself, which most powerfully motivated participation in collective action. This finding complicates existing rational choice explanations for the relationship between trust and political participation.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7265 words || 
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2. Scissors, Lauren., Gill, Alastair. and Gergle, Darren. "“You Can Trust Me,” “I Can Trust You”: Linguistic Accommodation and Trust in Text-Based CMC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301043_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines how different forms of linguistic accommodation relate to the establishment of trust in a text-chat environment. Sixty-two pairs participated in an iterative social dilemma investment game and periodically communicated via Instant Messenger (IM). Novel automated and manual analysis techniques identify linguistic accommodation at verbatim and semantic levels. Our results contribute to the trust and computer-mediated communication literatures: “Good” accommodation (linguistic mimicry, similarity in use of positive and task-related words) is associated with high levels of interpersonal trust while “bad” accommodation (e.g. similarity in use of negative words) is associated with low levels of interpersonal trust.

2008 - International Communication Association Words: 121 words || 
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3. Matthes, Joerg., Wirth, Werner. and Schemer, Christian. "Understanding the Consequences of Trust. The Effects of Trust in News Media on Trust in Politics." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232753_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Trust in media and trust in politics are two highly intertwined mechanisms that are of utmost significance to modern societies. Mass communication scholars agree that political actors are always interested in the transmission of their trustworthiness and credibility. However, since this transmission is a mass-mediated phenomenon, trust in politics can not evolve when there is no trust in news media. This idea is tested with survey data on the Swiss debate about asylum policy in 2006. Path analysis shows that both newspaper and television trust increase political trust which in turn increases political participation. However, only newspaper trust explains learning from the news. The results are discussed in terms of their importance for trust and credibility theory in mass communication research.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 10360 words || 
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4. Yoo, Jina. "“Why Should I Trust You?” The Path From Information Valence to Uncertainty Reduction, Cognitive Trust, and Behavioral Trust." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14397_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This research examined how valence of information affects relational outcomes in initial interaction. The relational outcomes of interest here are uncertainty reduction and the states of both cognitive trust and behavioral trust. Uncertainty level and the cognitive state of trust should act as the preconditions for behavioral trust, as behavioral trust involves actual risk in a vulnerable situation rather than simply a perception of the other individual. In order to examine the causal relationship between information valence and multi-dimensional aspects of trust, an experiment was conducted. Participants were randomly given either positively or negatively valenced information about a confederate and were asked to fill out questionnaires assessing their uncertainty level and cognitive state of trust toward the confederate. The Prisoner’s Dilemma game was used to operationalize the construct of behavioral trust. The results indicated that valence of information had a significant effect on the cognitive level of trust, especially, perceived trustworthiness. However, information valence did not have a significant effect on predicting behavioral trust, except for the positively valenced information condition. The path model indicated that both uncertainty reduction level and perceived trustworthiness were significant predictors for behavioral trust when the individual was exposed to a piece of positive information about the partner.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7927 words || 
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5. Auger, Giselle A.. "Trust me, trust me not: An experimental analysis of the effect of transparency on trust and behavioral intentions in organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582129_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the early 1990s calls for increased transparency have risen in all sectors of society. Seen as a solution to lapses of organizational ethics and misdeeds, transparency can help to restore trust, curtail employee dissatisfaction, and diminish reputational risk or damage (Bandsuch et al., 2008; Rawlins, 2009). Research has identified transparency as a two part construct highlighting either an organization’s reputation for transparency or its efforts to communicate transparently (Auger, 2010; Rawlins, 2009). Further research established the link between communicative transparency and trust (Rawlins, 2008); however, the link between organizational transparency and trust has yet to be tested. Using experimental design this study examined the relationship between both types of transparency on trust and positive behavioral intentions of stakeholders in a crisis situation. Results determined that transparent organizations that communicate transparently have higher levels of trust and positive behavioral intentions overall and more than twice the levels than non-transparent organizations that do not communicate transparently. Moreover, each of the transparency constructs was shown to have independent effects on trust and positive behavioral intentions of stakeholders in crisis.

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