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Showing 1 through 5 of 5 records.
2008 - The 59th Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt Words: 320 words || 
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1. Hartwig, Melinda. "The Tomb of Menna (TT 69) Project 2007 Season" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 59th Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Grand Hyatt Seattle, Seattle, WA, Apr 25, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p237339_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Abstract: The tomb of Menna (TT 69) is one of the finest painted, non-royal Egyptian tombs open to the public today. Its decoration represents the height of ancient Egyptian painting, a visual textbook of what the Egyptians could do in that medium. During the Fall 2007 season (2 Sept.–20 Dec. 2007), four phases of the project were completed: 1, the tomb and its environs were surveyed to create an exact ground plan of the tomb; 2, high resolution digital images were taken and joined with an extensive net of measured points taken inside of the tomb to create an exact record of the chapel decoration; 3, the first conservation phase was conducted with emergency stabilization of the painting and Paraloid B-72 (an acrylic polymer) removal; and 4, archaeometry was utilized which joined visual analysis with x-ray fluorescence, RAMAN spectroscopy, and colorimetry (visible, ultraviolet and near infrared). This fourth phase was the first time these non-invasive archaeometric processes were used together in Egypt to identify and characterize the materials (pigments, binders, coatings, plasters) used in the paintings with the goal to understand various pictorial techniques and to help the conservators with their restoration of the paintings. One interesting finding is the variety of hues created by combining pigments in many different mixtures before painting on the wall. Frequently, the mixture of red would vary from one figure to the other, even in successive figures.This paper will discuss more preliminary results of the Fall 2007 season. The Tomb of Menna Project (TT 69) is a sponsored project of Georgia State University (GSU) and the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE), Egyptian Antiquities Conservation (EAC) Project with funding from USAID, working in collaboration with a number of European partners, most notably the European Center for Archaeometry, University of Liège, the University of Ghent, the Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France (C2RMF) and the Supreme Council of Antiquities in Egypt.

2012 - The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt Words: 239 words || 
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2. Kiser-Go, Deanna. "Pharaoh as Hunter: Micro- and Macro-Meaning in TT 143" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Renaissance Providence Hotel, Providence, RI, Apr 27, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562115_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout most of ancient Egypt’s history its ruler followed a prescribed set of actions based on ideological preferences. It was the king’s responsibility to uphold maat, and this burden was articulated in several roles, including shrewd, triumphant hunter—of both animals and foreign enemies. These dangerous encounters appear in a variety of contexts, from tomb paintings to the ornamentation on household objects. Among the former are private translations of the same kingly duty, such as the spearing of fish, crocodiles and hippopotami. Pharaoh himself dispatches hapless desert game and aggressive riverine beasts with both spear—or harpoon—and bow and arrow. Theban Tomb 143 was commissioned for unknown occupants, but contains unfinished sketches of royal personages in two important poses: spearing a lion during hand-to-hand combat and preparing to shoot an arrow at absent quarry. Scholars have previously stated that the images there depict the king hunting and teaching his son archery techniques. These are, indeed, the actions portrayed, but this paper argues for a more profound meaning for the scenes. The longstanding importance of the lion in Egyptian art has been documented by Wreszinski (Löwenjagd), especially in connection with the greater Near East, but here I also examine the symbolism implicit in the ruler dispatching prey by means of a spear or bow and arrow. Both activities must have been synonymous with fulfilling his royal obligation to maintain maat by defeating chaos.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 6 words || 
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3. Henson, Bryce. and Denzin, Norman. "Tagggy tt" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p963354_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This is a blah blah blah.

2012 - The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt Words: 152 words || 
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4. Ayad, Mariam. "Reviving Harwa: Selection & Layout out of Opening of the Mouth Scenes in TT 37" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Renaissance Providence Hotel, Providence, RI, Apr 27, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562317_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Opening of the Mouth (OM) ceremony is arguably the most commonly attested ancient Egyptian ritual. Centrally located in the Asassif cemetery, Theban Tomb 37 (belonging to Harwa, a top-ranking official of Egypt’s Twenty-fifth dynasty) contains one of the most extensive versions of the ritual. Yet, to date, Harwa’s selections from the OM scenes, which survive in a poor and fragmentary state on the walls of the tomb’s second pillared hall, have not been fully identified. This paper reports on the efforts to register, digitally record, and put together fragments bearing OM scenes recovered from the tomb’s second pillared hall. The project, conducted over a period of three seasons at the tomb, has enabled us to identify “new” scenes, not previously attested from the tomb of Harwa. This paper outlines Harwa’s selections of OM scenes and suggests a rationale for their particular placement along the walls of his second pillared hall.

2018 - American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Annual Meeting Words: 194 words || 
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5. Laboury, Dimitri., Den Doncker, Alexis., Tavier, Hugues. and Pieke, Gabriele. "Recent research in the tomb of Sennefer (TT 96A)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Annual Meeting, University Park Hotel, Tucson, AZ, Apr 20, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1389224_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Belgian Archaeological Mission in the Theban Necropolis, a joint project of Brussels and Liège universities since 2010, investigates a sector in the southern part of the cemetery of Sheikh Abd el-Gurna, in a concession including three major tombs of the middle of the 18th dynasty: TT 29 and 96, respectively made for the vizier of Amenhotep II, Amenemope, and his cousin, the governor of Thebes, Sennefer, and the slightly earlier TT C3, in the name of the substitute of the chancellor Amenhotep, son-in-law of his superior, the chancellor Sennefer(i) (owner of TT 99), rediscovered by the mission.
The paper will present the recent research undertaken in the context of a project entitled “Painters and Painting in the Theban Necropolis during the 18th Dynasty” (initiated thanks to a Research Incentive Grant of the FNRS), in the unpublished tomb chapel of Sennefer (TT 96A), connected to his famous so-called “vineyard tomb” (TT 96B). It will focus on the study of painterly practices attested in this exceptional tomb, the artistic strategies developed by Sennefer to negotiate and promote his identity for future generations, and the various elements that allow to reconstruct the “biography” of this commemorative monument.


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