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2018 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Jackson, Rachyl. "Comparing Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Online Communities: A Natural Language Processing Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 07, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1371219_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As more and more children and adults are diagnosed with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, efforts to manage the disease have shifted toward online support communities. Chronic disease patients are turning to social networking platforms for healthcare advice and support. This paper compares how Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics use Twitter for peer support and disease self-management purposes. Tweets were analyzed using the Natural Language Processing tool Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software. Tweets were scored using the following classes: positive emotion, negative emotion, social processes, biological processes, and time orientation. This analysis revealed that Type 1 diabetics prioritize peer support activities, especially discussions of social processes using positive emotion. Type 2 diabetics however, prioritize self-management activities, frequently referencing biological processes using negative emotion. Additionally, Type 1 diabetics commonly reference the past while Type 2 diabetics prefer to use the present tense. Recognizing these differences allows for improved individualized treatment for the diabetes epidemic.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8621 words || 
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2. Wu, Zhiming. "From Ideal Type to Normal Type: Trust in Evolutionary Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722272_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Trust, as a dynamic social reality, should be examined within different types of society. Based on the various scholarly typologies of trust in literature, this paper distinguishes three “ideal types”(see: Weber, 1978) of trust which provide us with descriptions of trust. Still, to explain trust, we suggest using pure concepts or “normal types”(see: Tonnies, 1957). We turn to the trust in family and community to understand how trust in society, at large, evolves. We finally conclude that cross-national variations in trust should be attributed more to the macro-level social forces, such as family structure, neighborhood characteristics and sociopolitical environment.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 177 words || 
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3. Osborne, Jeffery. and Salfati, C.. "Connecting Active Shooter Offender & Incident Characteristics: Do Different Types of Offenders Commit Different Types of Incidents?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149611_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Active shooter incidents have been described as situations wherein individuals enter a public setting and with a firearm kill or injure multiple people. Previous literature on this topic tends to employ case-study methodologies and uses descriptive statistics to identify frequent characteristics of these offenders and incidents. Recently, however, research has placed a greater emphasis on empirical testing to better examine the connection between active shooter offenders and their incidents. Currently, the extent to which offender-level characteristics influence incident-level characteristics remains unknown. Importantly, an empirical assessment of whether different types of active shooters commit different types of incidents can help practitioners be better prepared for different types of situations, as well as more informed when designing risk assessment models for a variety of individuals. The present study examined information pertaining to both offender-level and incident-level characteristics of active shooter incidents that were carried out between 2000 and 2013. Using Multidimensional Scaling techniques, distinct subtypes of incidents were identified. Results will be discussed in the context of practical implications for law enforcement involved in an active shooter incident.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 5182 words || 
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4. Nan, Xiaoli., Dahlstrom, Michael., Richards, Adam. and Rangarajan, Sarani. "Influence of Evidence Type and Narrative Type on HPV Risk Perception and Intention to Obtain the HPV Vaccine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639397_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research examines the influence of evidence type (statistical, narrative, or hybrid) and narrative type (first-person or third-person) on risk perceptions about HPV and behavioral intentions to get the HPV vaccine. A total of 174 college students who had not received the HPV vaccine participated in a control experiment. Results show that that the hybrid message containing both statistical and narrative descriptions of HPV resulted in greater perceived risk of getting HPV than either of the messages containing just one of the evidence types – statistics or narrative. Moreover, the first-person narrative message led to greater risk perceptions about HPV than the third-person narrative message. Both evidence type and narrative type had an indirect effect on intention to get the HPV vaccine free of cost through HPV risk perceptions. Implications of the findings are discussed.

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