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Showing 1 through 5 of 5 records.
2010 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 108 words || 
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1. Scribner, Jordan. "Tyson in the Frying Pan: A Case Study of Tyson Foods, Inc.'s Apologia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 12, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485327_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This case study will discuss how Tyson Foods, Inc. defends itself and attempts to clear its reputation, according to the research of Ryan, Ware, and Linkugel. Next, this case study will identify the process in which poultry-processing plants are to treat wastewater and the dangers of wastewater from poultry-processing plants if left untreated. Furthermore, this paper will examine the accusation and defense of Tyson Foods, Inc. Finally, this paper will offer a judgment on the effectiveness of Tyson's apologia and use of metaphors and will establish a recommendation if Tyson Foods, Inc. failed to use the most effective posture, strategies, and metaphors in its defense.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 207 words || 
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2. Schally, Jennifer. "Legitimizing the Harm of Factory Farming via Corporate Narratives Online: The Case of Tyson Foods" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 19, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675033_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is a work of green criminology, seeking to understand how harm to the environment and to non-humans operates. Drawing on narrative criminology, I clarify the ways in which factory farm corporations attempt to produce and present “good” identities to the public via corporate websites. There is little contention that factory farming inflicts major harms on both the environment and on non-human animals. In order to perpetuate the disconnect between people’s behaviors (i.e. eating meat) and the consequences of their behaviors (i.e. harm to animals and the environment), corporations of the factory farming industry must somehow mask or legitimize their harmful actions. Corporations do this partly through their websites, where they distance themselves from the factory-farm image and present themselves as good corporate citizens who are “stewards of the animals, land and environment.” This paper explores the themes of corporate identity and the use of the internet as a means to construct this identity as well as the harms of factory farms. Further, this paper joins the green criminological perspective with the framework of narrative criminology in order to explain corporate use of websites in constructing “good” identities via a case study of the corporate website of Tyson Foods

2010 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 95 words || 
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3. Erai, Michelle. ""If I win I might tattoo my face." Mike Tyson as Maori Artifact?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, CO, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p428063_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In February, 2003, ten days before his fight with Clifford “the Black Rhino” Etienne, Mike Tyson decided to tattoo his face. Considered by tattoo artists to be of the ‘tribal genre,’ the design is most similar to those seen in traditional Maori carvings and tattoos. This paper examines the conditions of possibility within which a twentieth-century Brooklyn-born Black boxer might commission a facial tattoo so influenced by the forms of a (geographically and temporally) distant indigenous practice. The tattoo prompts me to ask, “What are indigenous artifacts and where do they belong?”

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 208 words || 
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4. Erai, Michelle. ""If I win the title, I might tattoo my face." Mike Tyson as a reassembled object?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417819_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In February, 2003, ten days before his fight with the “Black Rhino” Etinenne, Mike Tyson decided to tattoo his face. Considered by tattoo artists to be of the ‘tribal genre,’ the design is most similar to those seen in traditional Maori carvings and tattoos. This paper examines the conditions of possibility within which a twentieth-century Brooklyn-born boxer might commission a facial tattoo so influenced by the forms of a (geographically and temporally) distant indigenous practice. The tattoo prompts me to ask, “What are indigenous artifacts and where do they belong?”

Canadian artist Brian Jungen uses modified mass-produced objects to invite us to examine the circumstances within which indigeneity might be produced and fetishized. His sculptures, particularly those made from sporting equipment, are useful here in considering the ways in which an indigenous aesthetic can be evoked to allow a re-assembling, a re-articulation of masculinity and conquest.

This discussion is not so much a weighing of authenticity or of rights, but is an exploration of the racializing and gendering processes as exhibited in a Black man’s tattoo and a Dunne-za man’s art. It is about violence and consumption in the constructions of gender and race; about spectacle and the body in a transnational cartography of desire.

2011 - 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5694 words || 
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5. Mandela, I. Blaze. "Mike Tyson's 1992 Trial Revisited: Rape Attribution for African-American Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, Oct 04, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p515427_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The attribution of believability, responsibility and sentencing will be measured in a vignette based off the 1992 Mike Tyson rape trial by presenting four possible pairings: 1) White victim/White perpetrator 2) White victim/Black perpetrator 3) Black victim/White perpetrator 4) Black victim/Black perpetrator. The researcher’s hypothesis is that there will be a significant difference between males’ and females’ attribution and also that the manipulation of race in the scenario will cause a significant difference in attribution. The data set is comprised of undergraduate students at Georgia State University and “friends” of the researcher on Facebook. The size of the sample is 235 students, 159 identify as female and 89 identify as male. The researcher analyzes the data set for significant differences using SPSS statistical analysis. The results of the study indicate that the only statistically significant bias in the study was shown in the “believability” section of the survey, with both genders believing the Black perpetrator over the White victim at a significantly higher rate when compared to the other pairings. Curiously, this did not preclude them from showing bias while attributing responsibility and sentencing. Overall, the findings of the study indicate considerable departures from literature trends. The results show that race and gender, in general, did not have an impact on attribution for this population of African-American students. The gender and race egalitarianism in the results can be interpreted as being due to the race of the participants, contemporary societal expectations or the connotative effects of the attribution questions.


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