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2009 - 94th Annual Convention Words: 184 words || 
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1. Davis, Markeysha. "“Is U Is Or Is U Ain’t” Black?: Haki Madhubuti, the Black Arts Movement, and the Call for Collective Catharsis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sep 30, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377380_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will focus on the goal of Black Arts poet, publisher and scholar Haki Madhubuti (Don L. Lee) to publicize and perform Frantz Fanon's theory of “collective catharsis,” of African Americans in the 1960s and 1970s in order to bring them to a communal consciousness. Madhubuti, like other artists operating within this movement, composed pieces that were self-reflective, deconstructive and, paradoxically, reconstructive to the black identity. Selected pieces from his collections Black Words That Say: Don’t Cry, Scream (1969) and We Walk the Way of the New World (1970) will compose the structure of my analysis of the theories of Fanon and a host of other scholars from the Black Arts Movement. Some goals for this paper include: the establishment of a working definition of “collective catharsis” as posited by Fanon and supported by re-readings of Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Harold Cruse; connecting the evolved and adapted theories of Black Arts critics and scholars to Fanon’s definition in length; and finally, showing selected works of Madhubuti as the theory of Fanon (and the later theorists) in practice.

2009 - 94th Annual Convention Words: 186 words || 
Info
2. Davis, Markeysha. "“Is U Is Or Is U Ain’t” Black?: Don L. Lee, The Black Arts Movement, and the Call for Collective Catharsis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 94th Annual Convention, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p377758_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: This paper will focus on the goal of Black Arts poet, publisher and scholar Don L. Lee (now, Haki Madhubuti) to publicize and perform Frantz Fanon's theory of “collective catharsis,” of African Americans in the 1960s and 1970s in order to bring them to a communal consciousness. Lee, like other artists operating within this movement, composed pieces that were self-reflective, deconstructive and, paradoxically, reconstructive to the black identity. Selected pieces from his collections Black Words That Say: Don’t Cry, Scream (1969) and We Walk the Way of the New World (1970) will compose the structure of my analysis of the theories of Fanon and a host of other scholars from the Black Arts Movement. Some goals for this paper include: 1) the establishment of a working definition of “collective catharsis” as posited by Fanon and supported by re-readings of Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Harold Cruse; connecting the evolved and adapted theories of Black Arts critics and scholars to Fanon’s definition in length; and finally, showing selected works of Lee/Madhubuti as the theory of Fanon (and the later theorists) in practice.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 36 pages || Words: 11201 words || 
Info
3. Berg, John. "The Political Economy of the U. S. Party System: A Barrier to Social Change?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p268455_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: An historical and theoretical exploration of the relationship of political parties to social forces in the United States, and of the role of parties in social change.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 215 words || 
Info
4. Finley, Peter. and Finley, Laura. "U-rine the Money: How Drug Testing Has Spawned Internet Steroid and Detox Product Sales." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p31905_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As employers, schools, and sports organizations are increasingly mandating drug testing, we are witnessing a concomitant rise in sales of steroids and detoxifying products. It seems drug testing may be spawning new markets. This has been documented by Tunnell (2004) in his exploration of the detox industry. What is perhaps unique is the use of the Internet to market these products. A simple search for "steroids" using the search engine google.com reveals a number of sources to purchase allegedly legal steroids, including information on usage cycles, side effects, and often offering free items like newsletters and magazines. Most sites present themselves as legitimate health authorities, regardless of their actual credentials. Similarly, it is not difficult to find purveyors of detoxification products or of masking agents. One site, dmoz.org, provides links to a number of sources where interested persons can purchase an array of products to clean their systems or mask drug use so as to beat drug tests.

This paper will first chronicle the recent increase in drug testing. Next, it will present an analysis of Web Sites used to sell performance enhancing drugs, as well as sites offering detox products or masking agents. It will provide a description of the number of sites readily available, as well as the claims made by the sites analyzed.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 4917 words || 
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5. Kovacs, Rachel. "Nations, Cultures, and Corporate Social Responsibility: Communication Advocacy in a Diverse, Devolving U. K." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234774_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract
This paper discusses how British NGOs used a range of activist strategies to elicit greater corporate social responsibility (CSR) in support of U.K. regional and national cultures, culture-specific representations in electronic communication, and in particular, “endangered genres” in that country. It explores some of the prescient issues in this field and the .technological and industry changes that have catalyzed U.K. activists. Its primary focus is on the strategies and impact of NGO viewer and listener broadcasting advocacy groups, community media associations, coalitions, and informal groups that seek to advance indigenous culture and get government and media corporations to both respond to these stakeholders and commit to policy and regulatory changes. The chapter also references pressure group activities with respect to the current crisis in children’s television throughout the U.K.’s nations. Particular emphasis will be placed on CSR structures and vehicles for cultural expression in Scotland, Wales, the North, and other underrepresented regions and on an examination of if, and how, political devolution is intertwined with cultural agendas.

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