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2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 26 pages || Words: 12452 words || 
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1. Benner, Thorsten., Mergenthaler, Stephan. and Rotmann, Philipp. "Doctrine Development in the UN Peacebuilding Apparatus: The Case of UN Constabulary Police, 1999-2006" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251756_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper presents a framework for the analysis of doctrine development in the UN peacebuilding apparatus and applies it to the case of constabulary police (“formed police units”) in UN peace operations. After initial resistance from the UN Secretariat and years after their first deployment under the UN flag to Kosovo and East Timor, constabulary police have become a standard tool for missions tasked with interim public security provision. Even this breakthrough, however, did not secure the smooth development and adoption of more detailed conceptual guidance on their functions and operation alongside military contingents. This paper traces the process of developing such doctrine and presents preliminary hypotheses on the key factors that enabled and hindered this process of doctrine development.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 218 words || 
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2. Thorvaldsdottir, Svanhildur. "How to Win Friends and Influence the UN: Donor Influence on the UN Bureaucracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127556_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Are states able to influence the policy decisions of international institutions via their bureaucracies and, if so, under what conditions? Employing two distinct analyses of United Nations Programmes and Funds, this paper suggests an answer in the affirmative; that states are able to influence policy decisions of IOs by leveraging their bureaucracies, and describes a condition under which they are able to accomplish this. The paper demonstrates that major donors to UN agencies are disproportionately represented on the staffs of those agencies, and that this has distinct policy implications. In particular, the more staff that major donors have within the agencies, the more the agency's aid policy reflects those states' bilateral aid preferences. Furthermore, these results are not driven by the most powerful countries in the system, which suggests that this is an avenue of influence open to a considerable number of countries. These results indicate that the preferences of international bureaucrats are less independent than we have previously thought and that they may, indeed, be endogenous to the states that pushed for their hire to begin with. These findings speak to questions in the literature about when and how states are able to wield informal influence within IOs while also suggesting that more countries are able to use informal influence to their advantage than is usually thought.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7882 words || 
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3. Korver-Glenn, Elizabeth. "(Un)Comfortable and (Un)Safe: How White Housing Market Professionals' and Consumers' Racialized Emotions Reproduce Racial Segregation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1377612_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The extent of housing market discrimination and racialized residential preferences is well-documented, yet less is known about the mechanisms through which White real estate professionals’ discriminatory behaviors and White consumers’ racial preferences unfold on the ground. To address this gap, I examine how these stakeholders utilize racialized emotions as a decision-making lens in everyday housing situations and how the deployment of racialized emotions from both White professionals and consumers contributes to racial segregation. Drawing on one year of ethnographic fieldwork and more than 100 in-depth interviews with real estate agents, developers, home buyers, and other housing market stakeholders in Houston, Texas, I find that racialized emotions shape housing market processes in two ways. First, White consumers express comfort or fear depending on neighborhood racial makeup, and real estate agents and housing developers anticipate and facilitate these emotions by tailoring home and neighborhood selections to clients’ emotions. Second, White real estate agents and housing developers themselves experience these emotions and alter their professional behaviors to assuage discomfort or fear that they feel. Ultimately, these parallel processes reproduce racial segregation and housing inequality by reifying White spaces and racial biases, and by excluding Black and Latino areas and individuals from competitive real estate services and the potential for property value appreciation.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 191 words || 
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4. Drumond, Paula. "A Critical Perspective on Gender Mainstreaming and UN Peacekeeping: Lessons From the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501533_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recognizing that gender social constructions play a role during armed conflicts, the United Nations implements gender mainstreaming policies in its peacekeeping operations (PKO) as a strategy for making the concerns of women as well as of men an integral part of the design and implementations of its policies. However, this paper demonstrates that the UN implements biased gender policies that ignore gender-based violence (GBV) perpetrated against males during armed conflicts, creating silences that help perpetuate gender essentialism that portray men as perpetrators and women as victims. Hence, this paper intends to provide a critical analysis of UN gender mainstreaming policies, demonstrating the inadequacies of its gender policies in PKO. Thus, the paper will be divided in two parts. The first part will analyze the patterns of GBV that affect women and men during armed conflicts, focusing on GBV that was perpetrated in Bosnia in the presence of UNPROFOR peacekeepers. In the second part, the paper will discuss whether the UN has adopted the lessons learned from UNPROFOR in other peacekeeping missions through the case study of the gender policies in the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC)

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