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2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 20876 words || 
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1. Jahn, Elke. and Wagner, Thomas. "Eligibility Criteria for Unemployment Benefits and their Influence on the Equilibrium Rate of Unemployment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p198543_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In most OECD countries a worker must complete a qualifying period within a statutory base period to be eligible for unemployment benefits. Economic research indicates that the amount and duration of unemployment benefits can increase unemployment. To analyze the effects of the qualifying period and the base period on the equilibrium rate of unemployment, we use a matching model with an endogenous separation rate to show that there is a trade-off between the eligibility parameters and the benefit parameters. A country that combines a high level of unemployment benefits with a long benefit duration can neutralize the effect on the unemployment rate with a long qualifying period and/or a short base period.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 10384 words || 
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2. Françon, Baptiste. and Amable, Bruno. "The Effect of the Hartz Reform on Unemployment Duration and Post-Unemployment Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p731940_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Against the backdrop of the current Great Recession, Germany is commonly depicted in public debates as an economic ‘success story’ and a potential model for other European countries. Moreover, its current good labour market performances are often ascribed to the set of measures implemented by the Social Democratic-Green coalition from 2003 to 2005, usually referred to as the Hartz reforms. These structural reforms have profoundly transformed the German unemployment insurance system and its administration, while they also brought minor changes to the employment protection legislation: they notably led to substantial cuts in unemployment benefits and increased pressures on unemployed.
The conventional view in economics posits that such measures should indeed increase employment, by lowering the reservation wage of workers and by increasing the incentives for the unemployed to take up work. In this framework, generous benefits reduce work incentives because they alter the labour/leisure trade-off of unemployed. Moreover, they might lead unemployed to delay re-entry into the labour market as they wait for better job offers, and thus increase the duration of unemployment spells, as predicted by standard matching theories (Mortensen, 1987; Pissarides, 2000).
This paper focuses on one of the major feature of the Hartz reforms, namely the strong cuts in unemployment compensation duration for older workers. We take advantage of the particular design of this measure to evaluate its causal effect through a difference-in-differences estimation, using the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Results of duration models first show that this measure had only a limited impact on job take-up rates by the unemployed, and that this effect was concentrated on a specific age group who previously used unemployment compensation as a bridge to early retirement. Furthermore, we analyse the potential impact of this reform on the quality of post-unemployment outcomes, as more generous benefits might give the workers the opportunity to wait for better jobs. Taking into account various measures of matching quality (job stability, skills adequacy) and job quality (type of contract), we do find some evidence of a detrimental effect of the cuts in benefits duration on some of these dimensions.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8223 words || 
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3. Roelfs, David., Shor, Eran. and Blank, Aharon. "Misery Loves Company? A Meta-Regression Examining Aggregate Unemployment Rates and the Unemployment-Mortality Association" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723826_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Individual-level unemployment has been consistently linked to poor health and higher mortality, but some scholars have suggested that the negative effect of job loss may be lower when aggregate unemployment rates are high. We review three logics associated with this moderation hypothesis: health selection, social isolation, and unemployment stigma. We then test whether aggregate unemployment rates moderate the individual-level association between unemployment and all-cause mortality. To do so, we use a meta-regression model based on 62 relative all-cause mortality risk estimates from 36 studies. Studies were identified by searching Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science; and through an extensive iterative hand search of the literature. We find no relationship between the aggregate unemployment rate and the magnitude of the individual-level unemployment-mortality association. The magnitude of the individual-level unemployment-mortality association is approximately the same during periods of high and low aggregate-level unemployment. The findings suggest that unemployment experiences do not easily change when macro-economic conditions change. Therefore, efforts to ameliorate the negative social and economic consequences of unemployment should continue to focus on the individual and should be maintained regardless of periodic changes in macro-economic conditions.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7731 words || 
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4. Legerski, Elizabeth. and Cornwall, Marie. "Unemployed Men and the Women Who Love Them: Women's Labor Force Response to Spousal Unemployment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110629_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we seek to understand women’s responses to spousal unemployment. Using data collected from 29 in-depth interviews with the wives of unemployed steelworkers we examine how both economic conditions and gender schema influence the decisions men and women make regarding employment. We find that employment decisions are constrained by gender due to the gendered nature of individuals, work, and family. We first describe the development of the status of women in the workplace, the added worker effect, and the current literature on gender. Using excerpts from the interviews conducted we then describe how the employment options of women are severely limited by economic conditions, family responsibilities, and access to favorable wages. We also explore initial coping strategies to unemployment, specifically addressing the use of domestic production as a cost-saving technique and alternative to the increased labor force participation of the wife. We also explore the constraints caused by gender schema and a gendered division of labor. We conclude that although a woman may want to increase her labor force participation to help ameliorate the financial effects of job loss on her family, she may be unable to do so because of an unfavorable economy, work conditions, and powerful gender logics that influence the appropriateness of solutions.

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