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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 27 pages || Words: 9096 words || 
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1. Sanada, Yasuhiro. "Turning the Tide: A Whaling Moratorium Proposal at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment and the Bureaucratic Politics of Japan, the United State, and the United Kingdom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417050_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The adoption of a ten-year moratorium on commercial whaling at the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (UNCHE) in 1972 was one of the watershed events in the history of whaling diplomacy. However, the adoption of the ten-year moratorium was quite unexpected, given the fact that not only government officials in charge of whaling diplomacy in Japan but also those in the United States which was the initiator of the moratorium resolution opposed to the idea of an all-out prohibition of whaling. Moreover, even during the final minutes of the UNCHE, some countries including the United Kingdom had position sympathetic to Japan’s and the moratorium proposal therefore had every chance of being voted down.
The following questions thus arise: Why did the US change its policy in support of the moratorium on all commercial whaling? What kinds of bargaining maneuvers among which players in the US government yielded this action? Why was the resolution adopted by an overwhelming majority? Why did the United Kingdom shift its position? And why did Japan lose in the UHCNE on the moratorium proposal? Although whaling diplomacy has long been an object of study, little is known about the diplomatic bargaining between the member nations and the bureaucratic politics within these governments. We would like to answer the above questions, using archival documents of participating governments.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 195 words || 
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2. Fernandez McCann, Mairead. "Namibia and the United Nations: The Role of the United Kingdom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502011_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Namibia obtained independence on 21st March 1990, becoming a member of the British Commonwealth. This ended a period of more than thirty years of United Nations (UN) administration over Namibia. This was a strikingly prolonged struggle for independence at a time of speedy decolonisation elsewhere. Only months before in Windhoek, Namibia, in 1989, Margaret Thatcher announced at a press conference concerning Namibian independence and the elections, that it was ‘vital that the whole international community should respond decisively’, and that it was ‘essential that the authority of the United Nations should be upheld’ . She also stated that ‘We have always played a very constructive role, because that is our way’ . Thatcher’s public statement declared support for the UN, as many other public statements by the British government had previously done, but was this an accurate reflection of British policy in relation to Namibia?
This paper will investigate whether the interaction between the UK and the UN regarding the case of Namibia was as straight forward as the quote above suggests. By tracing Namibia’s long and winded path to Independence, we will be able to understand more fully, Britain’s changing relationship with the UN.

2013 - MWERA Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 3307 words || 
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3. Lugg, Elizabeth. and Hertzog, Matthew. "The Evolution of the Protections of Tenure in Relation to Academic Freedom in the United States and its Interpretation in the United States Legal System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Meeting, Hilton Orrington Hotel, Evanston, Illinois, Nov 06, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p675633_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Both inside and outside of academia, the definition and/or need for tenure/academic freedom are not clearly understood. Many, if not most, academics believe that tenure and academic freedom are inexorably intertwined and provide job security. Many outside of academia believe tenure is a “free pass;” a method by which incompetent or lazy academics continue to enjoy their comfortable jobs. The purpose of this paper will be a legal analysis/discussion of state and federal court cases dealing with the topics of academic freedom/ tenure in order to answer three questions:
(1) What definition have the courts provided for the concept of academic tenure?
(2) What definition have the courts provided for the concept of academic freedom?
(3) Citing the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution, what impact have the courts had on academic freedom/tenure?

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6569 words || 
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4. Exworthy, Mark., Gabe, Jonathan. and Jones, Ian. "Public Reporting in Cardiac Surgery in the United Kingdom and United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724456_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Public reporting of clinical performance is increasingly used in many countries to improve quality and enhance accountability. The assumption is that greater transparency will stimulate improvements by clinicians in response to peer pressure, patient choice or competition. Growing evidence suggests that peer pressure has the most potent effect of public reporting. Despite the international diffusion of public reporting, it is likely that national contexts (including health system imperatives, professional power, culture etc) will shape its form and impact. It is therefore instructive to compare the USA and UK. The USA was arguably the first country to adopt public reporting systematically in the late 1980s, now with over two decades of experience.. The UK is a more recent adopter; cardiac surgery was the first specialty to make these data transparent but it now being widely adopted through the National Health Service (NHS). Drawing on interview and observational data from both countries, this paper examines the public reporting at three levels (micro, meso and macro). The paper draws conclusions about the role of the medical profession (specifically cardiac surgery) in explaining the observed patterns.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12930 words || 
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5. Padamsee, Tasleem. "HIV/AIDS in the United States and the United Kingdom: Similar Social Challenges, Different Government Responses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723915_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The United States and the United Kingdom have grappled with HIV/AIDS for over three decades. Policy makers have been confronted with immense and evolving needs: to care for patients and pay for expensive treatments; to prevent new infections among varied social groups; and to conduct research on the spread, course, and treatment of HIV. Government responses to these challenges help determine who contracts HIV and who dies of AIDS, contributing as much to the realities of the epidemic as the virus itself and the development of medications to treat it. Yet the large-scale history of national responses to HIV/AIDS has been largely neglected by social scientists. This presentation draws on over 200 original interviews with policy makers and over 20,000 news articles to document the national HIV/AIDS policy choices that have been made since 1990, extending histories that have previously been written only for the first period of HIV/AIDS forward to the present day. Focusing on broad approaches that unify national policy trajectories and specific policies in the areas of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and research, this presentation demonstrates the critical role of health policy decisions in shaping both national epidemics and individual health outcomes. As this juxtaposition of U.S. and U.K. choices makes clear, comparative health research can help scholars articulate important new questions about the problem-solving capacities of various health systems, and envision new theoretical approaches to answering these questions.

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