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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 228 words || 
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1. Morrison, Kelly. and Lee, Carmen. "`I do not have Unprotected Sex’ …`Well I Don’t Have a Condom’: Descriptions of Safer Sex Conversations, Sex Attitudes and College Relationships" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368937_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recent research on college dating relationships indicates that a variety of casual sex relationships are experienced by today’s generation of students; including hanging out, hooking up (Grello, Welsh, & Harper, 2006; Paul & Hayes, 2002) friends with benefits (Bisson & Levine, 2006; Hughes, Morrison, & Asada, 2005; Mongeau, Ramirez & Vorrell, 2003), and more traditional dating relationships. These relationships often are facilitated by social networking sites (i.e., Facebook), occur in settings that are influenced by alcohol consumption, and in a culture where sexually transmitted diseases are considered a major challenge to public health (CDC, 2007). In the past, public health messages advocated the importance of “getting to know your partner” conversations as a risk reduction strategy (Welch Clline, Johnson, and Freeman, 1992). This article explores the types of safer sex conversations that college students report occurring in today’s transient relationships. Specifically, the relationships between sexual attitudes, conversations about safer sex, relationship type (i.e., hanging out, hooking up, one night stands, friends with benefits, etc.) and likelihood of engaging in safer sex are investigated. Three hundred and thirty three undergraduates from a large Midwestern University completed an online self-report survey describing their sexual attitudes, experiences with casual sex relationships, and safer sex conversations. Recommendations and implications for future research targeted at understanding the nuances of casual sex relationships and safer sex conversations are discussed.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9054 words || 
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2. Tilley, David. and Klein, Hugh. "Anonymous Sex and HIV Risk among Men Using the Internet to Find Unprotected Sex Partners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p504113_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This 2008-2009 study examines anonymous sex in a national random sample of 332 MSM who specifically use the internet to identify other men with whom they can engage in unprotected sex. Four research questions were examined: (1) How prevalent is anonymous sex in this population? (2) How is involvement in anonymous sex related to the practice of other HIV-related risk practices? (3) What factors differentiate men who recently engaged in anonymous sex from those who do not? (4) Among men who reported recent involvement in anonymous sex, what factors differentiate those who did this a lot from those who did not do it as much?
Results: Most of the men liked anonymous sex, and more than half engaged in the behavior during the month prior to interview. Involvement in anonymous sex was associated with involvement in a variety of HIV-related risk practices. Four factors were associated with having anonymous sex: (1) being HIV-positive, (2) answering all of the HIV-related knowledge questions correctly, (3) deriving greater enjoyment from having sex in public places, and (4) greater impulsivity. Seven factors were associated with greater versus lesser involvement in anonymous sex among those practicing the behavior: (1) being involved in a relationship with a long-term partner, (2) liking to have sex in public venues, (3) using bareback-oriented websites to identify sex partners, (4) greater impulsivity, (5) low level of condom use self-efficacy, (6) greater knowledge about HIV/AIDS, and either (7a) severe childhood maltreatment or (7b) Caucasian race.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5106 words || 
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3. Weller, Nicole. "Sexual Debut without Contraception: Can Sex Education Protect the Unprotected?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503593_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The most recent data from the National Survey of Family Growth indicates the rates of sexual debut for youth ages 15 to 19 have decreased suggesting a trend of delayed first sex for American adolescents. However, the rates of sexually transmitted infections (STI) are highest among this same age group indicating that when sexual debut occurs, it is accompanied by risky behaviors. Broad access and exposure to sex education may be responsible for delaying the age of sexual debut, but can it impact the rate of unprotected sex? This research conducts an event history analysis to measure if sex education exposure in the year prior, will effect the transition to first, unprotected sex for females and males ages 15 to 24. Further examination considers different formats of sex education (abstinence only, birth control methods, safe sex practices) on the transition to first, unprotected sex. Preliminary findings suggest that sex education format type has variable impacts on unprotected sex outcomes, but generally reduces the risk of unprotected first sex. However, the outcomes for females indicate that females are more likely to engage in unprotected first sex compared to their male counterparts.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Weller, Nicole. "Sexual Debut without Contraception: Can Sex Education Protect the Unprotected?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119550_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent data has shown that the age of sexual debut has increased for youth ages 15 to 19, but this same cohort is presenting the highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STI). This suggests that when sexual debut occurs, it is accompanied by risky behaviors. Broad access to sex education may be responsible for delaying age of sexual debut, but does it influence contraceptive use at debut? Using a nationally represented data set, this study examined if exposure to various sex education formats would reduce the odds of unprotected first sex. Results indicate that sex education formats focusing on birth control and pregnancy prevention were most successful in reducing unprotected sexual debut for both males and females. Additional comparisons found that females are more likely than males to have unprotected sexual debut, regardless of the sex education format, when compared to their male counterparts.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 6298 words || 
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5. Beattie, Irenee. "Future Expectations, Academic Achievement, and Unprotected First Sex Among Adolescent Girls" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p23083_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: How do future expectations interact with achievement to influence adolescent girls’ likelihood of engaging in unprotected first sex? Recent scholarship has considered the role high schools play as a key institutional setting for adolescent development and the transition to adulthood, yet little is known about how schools relate to risk-taking in sexual activity. Prior scholarship demonstrates that high educational expectations, achievement, and school experiences can lower adolescent girls’ likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behaviors. However, the joint influence of these related factors is unknown. Further, adolescent future expectations can be inflated or deflated in relation to high school academic experiences and college preparation, which might influence probabilities of unprotected first sex. Using National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS:88) data, I find that academic coursework serves as a buffer from engaging in unprotected first sex. Future expectations interact with achievement: those with inflated or deflated expectations (based on their achievement) and those with low expectations generally, are especially likely to engage in unprotected sex.
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