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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9721 words || 
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1. Schiff, Jennifer. "The Theory v. Application Disconnect: The Case of India's Ganges River Basin and the Unsuccessful Implementation of Integrated Water Resources Management Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p413137_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Global water scarcities promise to pose an increasing threat to human populations in the near future, and there has never been a more necessary moment for the creation of an encompassing global water management solution. Of course, the form and function of such a solution presents unique political and theoretical challenges for policymakers and scholars alike. For its part, the United Nations advocates Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), a voluntary regime that establishes a set of regulatory goals for water usage, as the solution to the world’s water woes. Implementation experience suggests, however, that the theoretical foundations underlying IWRM are often unsuccessful in practice, and India’s Ganges River Basin provides an example of this theory v. implementation disconnect. IWRM’s theoretical framework calls for the decentralization of environmental governance, the definition of water as a common-pool resource, and the creation of a negotiated regime to mitigate a dilemma of common interest, each of which fail to work in the case of the Ganges. This paper, then, offers an explanation as to why the theory underlying the IWRM regime is insufficient for successful implementation within the context of India’s unique water scarcity issues.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Draper, Nora. "Fail Fast: The Value of Studying Unsuccessful Technology Companies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1106334_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: “Fail fast, Fail Often” is the unofficial mantra of Silicon Valley. It reflects a contemporary technology industry ethos that encourages an unwavering focus on staying ahead of the curve and discovering the next big thing. This forward-looking focus encourages what I call industrial amnesia – a collective forgetting on the part of the technology industry about past projects and failed initiatives. In this paper, I draw on a research from a larger project on the history of the consumer privacy industry to advocate for the importance of studying failed industry actors. I argue media industries research should resist the seductive pull of the popular or new that prevails in Silicon Valley to occasionally focus on those companies that have failed. Through a brief examination of the rise, decline, and reemergence of the infomediary model, I reveal the possible interventions available to media industries research when attend to industrial failure.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 161 words || 
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3. Mandala, Marissa. and Freilich, Joshua. "Disrupting Terrorist Assassinations Through Situational Crime Prevention: An Analysis of Successful vs. Unsuccessful Attacks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1268187_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many criminology studies have applied situational crime prevention (SCP) to examine terrorism. However, the tactic of assassination has received limited attention from researchers compared to other tactics like suicide bombings. This paper begins to bridge the gap in the SCP and terrorism research by applying SCP to the analysis of successful vs. unsuccessful terrorist assassinations. Using data from the Global Terrorism Database (GTD), along with original data acquired from open sources, this paper seeks to determine how successful and unsuccessful assassinations compare with regards to different SCP variables. Examples of such variables include whether or not a guardian was present, the time of day the attack took place, and whether the attack occurred indoors or outdoors. Statistical analyses are conducted on a random sample of 100 successful and 100 unsuccessful assassinations that occurred between 2005 and 2014. Based on the SCP literature, it is hypothesized that some variables will be strongly associated with successful assassinations. Findings have important implications for prevention.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 11188 words || 
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4. Sims, Jeanetta. and Pfau, Michael. "Using Inoculation to Protect Value-in-Diversity Attitudes: An Unsuccessful Test and a Nuanced Antidote" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424016_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study tests McGuire’s (1961, 1962, 1964, 1970) inoculation theory as a strategy to protect value-in-diversity attitudes and investigates the impact of inoculation messages on minority and non-minority issue involvement. Results failed to support an overall inoculation effect, but instead indicate a more nuanced path to resistance within the organizational diversity context. Minority members experienced greater susceptibility of their pro-diversity attitudes, and inoculation posed a viable strategy for conferring attitudinal resistance with higher involvement levels.

2012 - ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10347 words || 
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5. Dumitrescu, Delia. "Why do people vote for unsuccessful parties? A prospect-theory response" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 35th Annual Scientific Meeting, Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL, Jul 06, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570726_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper examines why people choose to vote for their party in first past the post elections despite perceiving it as a loser. Two models are proposed and formalized. The first is grounded in prospect theory, and asserts that people will be risk seeking or risk adverse depending on their framing of the election as a loss or as a gain situation. It asserts that voters will switch to their second preferred party only if this party is perceived as the frontrunner and their own party trails heavily. The second model is grounded in strategic voting and asserts that voters will attempt to maximize their expected utility from the election. Evidence from six hybrid experimental elections and from a representative panel of Labour and Liberal Democrat supporters in the 2010 British elections strongly support the prospect theory model. Implications of these findings are discussed.

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