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2016 - ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Purinton, Ted. and Skaggs, Jennifer. "What Can Liberal Arts Institutions Outside the US Tell Us About Where the Model is Headed in the US" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good, Hyatt Regency Columbus, Columbus, Ohio, Nov 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1158527_index.html>
Publication Type: Scholarly Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Independent American/liberal arts institutions operating outside the US rely on models common in the US. As this institutional type grows around the world, it has experienced various modifications. This paper looks at those changes through a neoinstitutional lens to understand how transnational contexts of HE influence the liberal arts model.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 147 words || 
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2. Straka, Silvia., Rowe, Gladys. and Hart, Michael. "Within Us, Among Us, Around Us: Negotiating the Tensions of Doing Anti-Colonial Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p732272_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The growing methodological literature on Indigenous research has yet to address the practical experiences and inherent tensions of doing Indigenous, anti-colonial research. The tensions are evident on several levels including within researchers, amongst research teams of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers, and throughout research contexts. These tensions are readily evident in movements that serve to “Indigenize the Academy” where colonial, Eurocentric foundations are challenged by researchers working to create space for Indigenous research projects. As three researchers, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, working together on such a project, we experienced ongoing tensions throughout all aspects of the research process that existed within us, among us, between us and the Academy, and between us and the community. We will present our critical reflections on the nature of these tensions, how they varied depending on our respective social locations, and our lessons learned in translating the principles of Indigenous research into practice.

2016 - ASEEES Convention Words: 71 words || 
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3. Behrends, Jan. "'Some call us heroes, others call us killers': Experiencing Violent Spaces—Soviet Soldiers in the Afghan War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1132321_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Using memories of and interviews with Soviet soldiers, this paper discusses their experience of combat and physical violence during the Soviet War in Afghanistan, where violence became the most important social resource. The soldiers and other Soviet personnel had to adapt to these conditions, which differed immensely from the late socialist society in the USSR. The paper traces their immersion into the violent space and discusses their behavior while in Afghanistan.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Pages: unavailable || Words: 4012 words || 
Info
4. Crandall, Matthew. "To Boldly Go Where No Hegemon has Gone Before: What Star Trek tells us about US Hegemonic Power" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241548_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The changing world order will be post-American in nature. This also means that the liberal world order failed in its mission of universalism,as a truly world order would include the incorporation of other countries such as China and Russia. This article will use themes from the fictional universe Star Trek as a framework to analyze the role of US foreign policy in this failure. Star Trek is a utopian post-modern vision for a future American lead world order. This article will evaluate US foreign policy through the lenses of Star Trek highlighting how US foreign policy has too often reflected the villains of Star Trek rather than the United Federation of Planets. In short, US has created a power based system for US interest rather than a rules based system established by values. By highlighting the similarities of Star Trek villains to US foreign policy, it will also be able to suggest a path forward to the creation of a truly united global world order in line with that presented in Star Trek. While Star Trek is science fiction, if several lessons from it were applied a peaceful world order might be more fact than fiction.

2017 - Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 296 words || 
Info
5. Guishard, Monique., Korin, Daniel. and Smith, Nicky. "No More Health Research About Us Without Us: Establishing CERA" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Jun 21, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1239218_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The multi-generational, multi-racial, multi-ethnic, socioeconomically diverse population of the Bronx has great wealth in social capital, dignity, and resilience. The Bronx is also, consistently ranked as the unhealthiest urban county in the nation. Compared to other NYC residents, Bronxites are more likely to die prematurely, live in unsafe neighborhoods, report poor to fair health, be born with low birthweight, have children living in poverty, lack health insurance, lack access to exercise opportunities, be hospitalized due to asthma or stroke, struggle with obesity and/or diabetes, be overexposed to air pollution and drinking water violations, and experience high levels of STIs. Addressing the health needs and inequities of Bronxites is vitally important. Yet there is a critical disconnect between community experiences of ill-health and researcher-driven health research initiatives. Due to historical examples of egregious violations of well-being and dignity in research, personal examples of: sexism, fatphobia, ableism, homophobia, and transphobia in healthcare settings—many residents mistrust researchers. We the members of the Bronx Community Research Review Board (BxCRRB) and community social psychologist Dr. Monique Guishard, have established a Community Engaged Research Academy (CERA) in the South Bronx to: 1) ameliorate much of the experience of scientific/institutional racism and research predation by centering the experiential knowledge, perspectives, and skills that communities bring to health research, dissemination, and action(s) 2) create opportunities to increase health research literacy in the Bronx; CERA will serve as a model for effective education and training. In this poster session, we will describe our use of community cafés and decolonial participatory action research ethics to engage our neighbors as equal partners in health research. This project is at the intersection complicating the social determinants of health and the epistemological commitments inherent in community psychology. CERA is funded by a PCORI Eugene Washington Engagement Award Contract #3422.

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