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2006 - Economics of Population Health: Inaugural Conference of the American Society of Health Economists Words: 497 words || 
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1. Asakawa, Keiko. and Feeny, David. "Generalizability of the Multiplicative Multi-attribute Utility Function for the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Economics of Population Health: Inaugural Conference of the American Society of Health Economists, TBA, Madison, WI, USA, Jun 04, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91529_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: BACKGROUND: There is substantial heterogeneity among individuals in preferences for health states. Results from many studies suggest that there is little systematic difference in the underlying preference structure for health states among different socio-demographic groups. However, other studies suggest that there may be systematic differences. The Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3) is a generic, multi-attribute, preference-based health-related quality of life (HRQL) measure widely used as a measure for describing health outcomes for patients and the general population and for economic evaluation of healthcare interventions. HUI3 includes 8 attributes (vision, hearing, speech, ambulation, dexterity, emotion, cognition and pain), with 5 or 6 levels for each attribute. In the development of the original HUI3 scoring function, approximately 90% of the sample rated the “all-worst HUI3 health state” as worse than dead (Group A), while 10% rated “dead” as the least preferred state (Group B). Are there differences in the structure of preferences between Groups A and B? To date, a direct comparison of HUI3 multi-attribute utility functions (MAUF) derived from populations with potentially different preferences toward dead has not yet been attempted.

AIM: To assess the generalizability of the HUI3 MAUF by estimating and comparing two HUI3 MAUFs: MAUF(A) (for Group A) and MAUF(B) (for Group B). Two research questions were investigated: (1) is there any difference in estimated MAUFs, (2) do any observed parameter differences in the two MAUFs affect the valuations of health states in applications?

METHODS: A decomposed approach was used to estimate two HUI3 MAUFs, one each for Groups A (n=193) and B (n=22). Data come from the original HUI3 MAUF estimation project. Parameters in two MAUFs were compared. Further, agreement between predicted HUI3 scores for the two MAUFs was examined using several criterion: mean differences (MD), mean absolute differences (MAD), standard deviation of the differences (SDD) and agreement (intra-class correlation, ICC) using 217 unique health states selected from Statistics Canada 1996/97 National Population Health Survey Microdata to cover a range of morbidity burdens from mild through severe.

RESULTS: Additive utility form was strongly rejected in favor of a multiplicative form for both MAUFs. Both groups demonstrated preference complementarity among the HUI3 attributes. The importance of hearing, speech, ambulation and emotion differed between the two MAUFs. Agreement between overall HUI3 scores from the two MAUFs was poor (MD=MAD=0.5, SDD=0.3, ICC=0.35). Stratified analyses showed moderate agreement for health states with mild burdens (HUI3>0.88; ICC=0.43) and poor agreement for health states with moderate to severe burdens (HUI3<0.89; ICC=0.32). The weighted MD (217 health states, each weighted by its prevalence) is 0.01, less than a clearly clinically important difference of 0.03.

CONCLUSIONS: Estimated scoring functions and valuations for health states importantly differed between the two groups. An implication is that in future preference elicitation surveys it may be important to over-sample Group B to gain precision. However, when the 217 health states were adjusted for their prevalence, there was no important mean difference in utility scores derived from functions from the two groups.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 32 words || 
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2. Jayet, Cyril. "The Identity-utility Dilemma: Understanding the Interplay of Identity and Utility for Explaining European Support" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1347566_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper proposes a cognitive approach that focuses on representations that underpin the support for the EU and evidences that this approach sheds light on a dilemma between identity and economic rationality.

2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 217 words || 
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3. Mahmud, Hasan. "“It’s My Money”: the Perception of Utility and Strategies of Controlling Remittances Utilization among Bangladeshi Migrants in Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634751_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper challenges the Neo-Economics of Labor Migration (NELM) perspective’s assumption about the remittance-receiving migrant household as the unit of analysis in understanding remittance utilization by recognizing migrants’ agency. It begins with insights from economic sociology that economic activities proceed by rationality, which is not an intrinsic quality of the economic man, but is constructed in individual’s social interactions and cultural perceptions. Through an ethnographic inquiry among a group of Bangladeshi migrants in Japan, this study finds that investing money in the purchase of land and starting up businesses, or depositing it in bank account for future use are the preferred ways to ensure the migrant’s desired income and social prestige. These motives originate not from mere economic hope, but from the migrants’ experiences abroad as well as through a continuous process of comparing their situation in Japan with that on their prospective return to Bangladesh. Following a Weberian perspective, this study argues that the socio-cultural settings these migrants live in cultivates in them entrepreneurial motives that drive them to strategize spending money in particular ways in Bangladesh, which lead them to claim authority in family decision-making. Thus, it recognizes the migrants’ agency in the utilization of remittances and calls forth the need to incorporate the migrants as a decision-maker in the discourse on remittances and development.

2006 - Economics of Population Health: Inaugural Conference of the American Society of Health Economists Words: 403 words || 
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4. Feeny, David., Furlong, William., Torrance, George., Goldsmith, Charles., DePauw, Sonja. and Kingston-Riechers, JoAnn. "A Multi-linear Multi-Attribute Utility Function for the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Economics of Population Health: Inaugural Conference of the American Society of Health Economists, TBA, Madison, WI, USA, Jun 04, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p90632_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Rationale and Objectives. Estimated multi-attribute utility functions have relied on linear additive or multiplicative functional forms that assume respectively a lack of preference interactions among attributes or only one type of preference interaction. Are there quantitatively important and statistically significant interactions in preferences among attributes in the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3) system? How would the performance of the less restrictive multi-linear model compare to the performance of the multiplicative model?

Methodology. HUI3 has 8 attributes, vision, hearing, speech, ambulation, dexterity, emotion, cognition, and pain, with 5 or 6 levels per attribute. A preference survey was conducted of a random sample of the general population (n = 256) using a one-half 2 to the eight power fractional factorial design plan. The same survey provided scores for the estimation of a multiplicative multi-attribute utility function. A parallel survey (n = 248) provided directly measured standard gamble utility scores for 73 HUI3 health states. The fractional factorial design permits the identification of all 8 main effects, 26 of 28 two-way interactions, and 4 of 56 three-way interactions terms. The estimated equation was forced to pass through 0 (for the health state with all attributes at lowest functional level) and 1 (all attributes at highest level). Agreement between directly measured scores from the second sample and scores from the multi-linear and multiplicative utility functions was assessed using an intra-class correlation coefficient.

Results. For the multi-linear model, the adjusted R-squared was 0.63. All 8 main effects were quantitatively important (coefficient >0.024) and statistically significant (p < 0.10). Two-way interaction terms indicating preference complementarity were quantitatively important and statistically significant in 18 cases and insignificant in 2 cases. Two-way interaction terms indicating preference substitutes were important and significant in 4 cases and insignificant in 2 cases. All 4 three-way interaction terms were important and significant. Agreement between directly measured scores and scores from the multiplicative function was much higher than agreement between directly measured scores and scores from the multi-linear function.

Conclusions. There are quantitatively important and statistically significant interactions in preferences among attributes of health status. These results call into question the use of linear additive multi-attribute utility functions. The multiplicative function out performed the multi-linear function in out-of-sample prediction. The omnibus interaction term of the multiplicative function indicates preference complementarity and appears to handle the preference interactions more than adequately.

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