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2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 192 words || 
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1. Williams, Marian., Demuth, Stephen. and Holcomb, Jeff. "Understanding the Influence of Victim Gender in Death Penatly Cases: The Importance of Victim Race, Sex-related Victimization, and Jury Decision-making" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 13, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p202278_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using data from the Baldus, Woodworth, and Pulaski (1990) study of Georgia's death penalty system, we examine the influence of victim gender in death penalty cases. Furthermore, to improve our understanding of the meaning of victim gender, we consider (1) the joint effects of victim gender and victim race, (2) victimization characteristics that might explain victim gender effects, and (3) the impact of victim gender at different decision making stages in the death penalty case process. We find that both victim gender and race are associated with death sentencing outcomes and an examination of the joint effects of victim gender and race reveal considerable differences in the likelihood of receiving a death sentence between the most disparate victim race-gender groups. In particular, it appears that black male victim cases are set apart from all others in terms of leniency afforded to defendants. We also show that the effect of victim gender is largely explained by gender differences in the sexual nature of some homicides. An examination of prosecutorial and jury decision making reveals that while victim gender has little impact on prosecutorial decisions, it has a meaningful impact on jury decision making.

2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 168 words || 
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2. Alderden, Megan. "What Victims Want: Do Sexual Assault Victims also use the “Good” Victim Ideology?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371768_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Analysis of criminal justice decision making processes consistently supports the idea that criminal justice practitioners use a set of criteria to efficiently discriminate between cases (see Steffensmeier, Ulmer, & Kramer, 1998; Spohn, Beichner & Davids-Frenzel, 2001), and the use of such criteria essentially weeds out those sexual assault cases that are not guaranteed to move forward through the criminal justice system (see Frohmann, 1991; Spohn et al., 2001). Less research, however, has been devoted to understanding the role of victim preferences in how sexual assault cases should be processed. This study will examine the conditions under which sexual assault victims engage in the legal process after having reported their cases to police. Specifically, this study will examine the victim, suspect, and incident characteristics and whether these factors were related to whether victims refused participate in the prosecution of the alleged offender or refused to cooperate in the investigation. Data are based on 630 criminal sexual assault cases reported to the Chicago Police Department from January to August 2003.

2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 252 words || 
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3. Madlingozi, Tshepo. "Good Victim, Bad Victim: Post-Apartheid Beneficiaries, Victims, and the Struggle for Social Justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183766_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The South Africa Truth and Reconciliation Commission was created not only to legitimise the new state but also to give birth to a new nation, a nation based on substantive equality, dignity and freedom. In this paper I focus on the failure of the transition process to put social justice on the agenda. Although, it could be said that the TRC process played an important role in bringing about stability and political reconciliation, in a word, political justice, the issue of social justice is a fairly neglected dimension in discussions on the TRC and the transition process in South Africa. This failure has a lot of implications especially given the fact that the gravest legacy that apartheid bequeathed to South Africa was one of systemic poverty, structural unemployment and inequality. In this paper, I argue that in transitional societies where conflict was also characterized by violent dispossession and socio-economic deprivation, the issue of social justice and thus redistribution should be central to the discussion. In order to do this, I will first look at how the taxonomy of victimhood has been interpreted within the human rights discourse to include notions such as, passiveness, being content with moral victory and putting the past behind. Related to this, I discuss the tendency, also a result of adopting the dominant conception of human rights discourse, of drawing a sharp distinction between perpetrators and beneficiaries. Focusing on beneficiaries would not be to engage in a witch-hunt but to move towards what Mahmood Mamdani calls sustainable reconciliation.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 199 words || 
Info
4. Parra, Michelle. and Pritchard, Adam. "Analyzing Campus Victimization: Is Awareness of Safety and Victim Services Protective against Victimization on Campus?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1044733_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It has been estimated that 19% of women and 6.11% of men in college will experience violent victimization (Krebs et al. 2007). Most colleges and universities offer specific programs and services aimed at addressing victimization on campus. It is often assumed that distributing information about safety services is an effective method of informing the available prevention and response services. However, few systematic studies have been conducted to examine the relationship between prior victimization and awareness of service of the students on campus. This study explores whether or not a student’s awareness of safety services is achieved primarily through information distribution efforts, or is more likely to be sought out by those with prior victimization experiences and/or those with victimization experiences while on campus. By comparing levels of service awareness across multiple configurations of pre-college and in-college victimization experiences, this study seeks to determine whether student service awareness results primarily from preventive awareness or from reactive awareness and investigates the implications of pre-college victimization for student awareness of safety services on campus.

Krebs, Christopher P, CH Lindquist, TD Warner, BS Fisher and SL Martin. 2007. "The Campus Sexual Assault (CSA) Study." Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, US Department of Justice.

2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 108 words || 
Info
5. Daigle, Leah. and Fisher, Bonnie. "Recurring Non-sexual Victimization: The Impact of Victim-Offender Relationship and Sex of Victim" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p373226_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research shows that a proportion of individuals who are victimized experience more than one victimization. What is not known, however, is what factors influence the patterning of recurring non-sexual victimizations. Using data from the National Crime Victimization Survey for 1992-2005, we explore the extent to which individuals experience recurring non-sexual victimization and its corresponding patterns. Specifically, the time-course, the likelihood of experiencing the same type of victimization, and the characteristics of recurring victimizations are investigated with specific attention given to whether the victim-offender relationship and the sex of the victim impacts these findings. Implications for reducing victimization by preventing recurring nonsexual victimization are considered.

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