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2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 200 words || 
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1. Straus, Murray. and Mattingly, MaryBeth. "Violence Socialization And Approval Of Violence: A World Perspective On Gender Differences And American Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 12, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p269866_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines whether American predominance among industrialized nations in homicide rates also applies to violence socialization experiences and attitudes approving violence, and examines gender differences in these aspects of violence. Data are from university students in the International Dating Violence Study in 32 nations , N=17,404. The results show that the US is above the median of the 32 nations for Within-Family Violent Socialization (such as witnessing violence between parents) and for Non-Family Violent Socialization (such as witnessing physical fights). However, for Violence Approval, US students are close to the median; and on Approval of Sexual Aggression (such as agreeing that once sex gets beyond a certain point, a man can't stop) in the lowest quartile. Thus, the US is high in violent socialization, but paradoxically, at or below the median in violence approval. The Violence Socialization and Violence Approval scale and subscale scores were always higher for men than women, but nations that are high in Violence Socialization of men are also high for women (r = .78) and nations that are high in Violence Approval by men are also high for women (r=.93). Implications for violence prevention will be discussed.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 172 words || 
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2. Ferguson, Christopher. "Video Game Violence, Television Violence and Youth Violence: Lots of Smoke, but Not Much Fire." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521269_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The potential influence of violent video games on youth violence remains an issue of concern for psychologists, policymakers and the general public. Although several prospective studies of video game violence effects have been conducted, none have employed well validated measures of youth violence, nor considered video game violence effects in context with other influences on youth violence such as family environment, peer delinquency, and depression. The current study builds upon previous research in a sample of 302 mostly Hispanic youth. Results indicated that current level of depression was a strong predictor of serious aggression and violence across most outcome measures, whereas peer delinquency and parental use of psychological aggression in relationships were weaker long-term predictors of youth violence, and positive family environment functioned as a weak protective factor for youth violence. Neither video game violence exposure, nor television violence exposure were prospective predictors of serious acts of youth aggression or violence. These results are put into context of criminological data on serious acts of violence among youth.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 193 words || 
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3. Heinskou, Marie. and Liebst, Lasse. "Violence in the Street, Violence of the Street - The Spatiality of Street Violence Among Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030719_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While in his early and general theory of interaction rituals, Randall Collins emphasised that social situations are both ’symbolic’ and ’material’, the latter dimension is largely absent from Collins’ theory of violence(Collins 2004; 1993: 214). Compared with criminology’s more recent situational studies of violence, it is noticeable that the analytical success of these studies is closely linked with understanding street violence as a spatial-situational phenomenon (Clarke 1997; Eck & Weisburd 1995; Bragand & Weisburd; 2010; Wikström et al. 2012; Sampson et al. 1997). In light of evidence for the spatial dimension of street violence, this paper takes its point of departure in a large study of Street Violence among youth in Copenhagen, Denmark (combining quantitative data from filed police reports (N = 900), data from CCTV and qualitative analysis of selected cases of street violence among youth in 2010-2012). We illuminate how the spatial, material and symbolic context of the situation is equally crucial to the outcome of the violent situation. Hence, we argue that the spatial characteristics of the violent situation constitute a fruitful addition to Collins’ micro-sociology on violence and serves as an crucial factor in explaining street violence among youth.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Somgynari, Connor. and Piazza, Scott. "The Violence that Violence Begets: Variation in Terrorist Responses to State Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1348124_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We explore the variation in terrorist group responses to different forms of state violence. Initial results indicate a short-term retaliatory effect focused in bombings but not armed assaults, varying on types of air and ground strikes by the state.

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