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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Pearce, Katy. and Vitak, Jessica. "Visible if You Do, Visible if You Don’t: How Social Media Complicates Concealment and Disclosure of Stigmatized Political Beliefs in an Authoritarian Setting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107067_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Disclosing and concealing stigmatized information and managing post-disclosure turbulence is greatly complicated by social media. The present study examines how this process unfolds among young people critical of their authoritarian regime. This is an interesting context because criticism is swiftly and harshly punished—thus highly stigmatized—with the anticipation of contagion of negative outcomes associated with criticizing the regime. Family are punished for the others’ actions, which influences every stage of the disclosure and turbulence process. Applying a multi-theoretical framework of Communication Privacy Management Theory, the Cycle of Concealment Model, and the Revelation Risk Model, this qualitative study (n=29) finds that disclosure concealment from family members is based on anticipated response and maintaining visibility is paramount for concealment. . Increased visibility afforded by social media complicates every stage of the disclosure process.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5400 words || 
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2. Llewellyn, Cheryl. "Proving Visible Sexualities: An Analysis of the Social Visible Requirement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726101_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The U.S. federal government will grant asylum to individuals from other countries if they can prove that they have a well-founded fear of persecution on account of a protected status, including race, ethnicity, religion, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group. A sizable number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) applicants have made the case that their sexual orientation constitutes a particular social group. Historically, proving membership became an exercise in showing the courts that the applicant was “gay enough,” relying on the extent to which an applicant was gender nonconforming. While the U.S. has deemed this type of stereotypical thinking impermissible, legal scholars are concerned about the rising prevalence of the “social visibility requirement,” or the requirement that applicants must prove both that their particular social group is visible in their country of origin and that they are an identifiable member of this group.

In this paper, I assess the concerns around the social visibility requirement by analyzing the existing precedents in sexual orientation cases. Using my original data set of all published case decisions of sexual orientation asylum, I determine if a precedent exists for social visibility and analyze the consequences for individuals making these types of claims. In addition to revealing basic patterns between the visibility requirement and case outcome, I show the specific mechanisms by which visibility operates in these cases. Ultimately, I conclude that the visibility requirement presents the possibility of a reversion to the stereotypical thinking already overturned by the circuit courts.

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