Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 398 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 80 - Next  Jump:
2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 2276 words || 
Info
1. Newton, Joanna. "The Vocabulary Gap: A Review of the Research on Socio-economic Status and Vocabulary Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p662483_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 50 words || 
Info
2. Masrai, Ahmed. "Effects of L1 Vocabulary Size and Lexical Organization on L2 Vocabulary Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p698995_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study found that there is a link between L1 vocabulary size and L2 vocabulary learning and that L1 lexical organization contributes to learners’ ability to build up a sizeable L2 lexicon. It also suggests that learners experience difficulties in acquiring L2 vocabulary when structured differently from the L1 lexicon.

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 49 words || 
Info
3. Ramírez Gómez, Danya. "Vocabulary Consolidation Strategies in Senior Learners: a Descriptive Study that Challenges Some of the Current Views on Vocabulary Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p698352_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This pioneer study about senior learners’ vocabulary consolidation strategies challenges traditional assumptions, and questions the use of certain research techniques. Through three experimental tasks, this study shows that a selective use of vocabulary consolidation strategies correlates with higher recall, but that learners are confused with regards to their own strategies. 

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 41 words || 
Info
4. Lai, Ying-Chun. "The Role of Vocabulary Learning Strategies in Vocabulary Retention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p699201_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigated the vocabulary consolidation strategies that Taiwanese EFL learners employ to learn new English vocabulary words. It provides important information regarding useful consolidation strategies for learning new words, which in turn can lead to more effective vocabulary strategy instruction.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Watson, Linda., Woynaroski, Tiffany. and Yoder, Paul. "Productive Spoken Vocabulary Drives Vocabulary Comprehension in Minimally-Verbal Children with Autism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p952778_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In typically development, comprehension is thought to drive production because comprehension precedes production. However, standard scores on vocabulary tests are comparable between modalities (i.e., comprehension and production). During early language development, young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) tend to have standard scores for language comprehension that are lower than their scores for language production (e.g., Charman et al., 2003; Volden et al., 2011; Ellis Weismer et al., 2010; Hudry et al., 2010). This ‘receptive disadvantage’ is also observed in infant siblings of children with ASD who later receive an ASD diagnosis (Hudry, 2014) and is unusual in most other populations with disabilities. Interestingly, many older children with ASD do not exhibit this receptive disadvantage (Pickles et al., in press). Examining the relation between early to later cross-modality associations in minimally verbal children with ASD may shed light on how the receptive disadvantage might be resolved.

We examined the relative strength of the associations between early vocabulary in one modality (e.g., comprehension) to later vocabulary in the other modality (e.g., production). To rule out common alternative explanations for differences in the cross-modality associations between early to late vocabulary, we used a cross-lag panel analysis. This approach controls for concurrent associations between modalities and for temporal stability within modality. Although no correlational design can rule out all alternative explanations, differences in these cross-lag associations are compatible with an interpretation that one modality has superior impact on the other.

Parents of 65 minimally verbal (M parent-reported number of words said = 18, SD = 30) preschoolers with ASD (95% Autistic Disorder, 5% PDD-NOS) completed vocabulary checklists at four measurement periods separated by 4 months. Three longitudinal intervals (i.e., panels) were examined (T1 to T3, T2 to T4, and T1 to T4). The MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory, Words and Gestures was the measure of comprehension and productive vocabulary. The raw scores were variables metrics. The Time 1 comprehension variable was square root transformed, which corrected a moderate positive skew. Production variables for all periods were log 10 transformed, which corrected severe positive skewness in the univariate distributions. Table 1 presents the results. Using a method of testing the difference in non-overlapping (the predictor and criterion variables are not shared in the compared associations) partial correlations from the same sample, there were significantly stronger associations between early production to later comprehension than between early comprehension to later production for the T2 to T4 and T1 to T4 panels (Raghunathan, Rosenthal, & Rubin, 1996).

These data suggest that minimally verbal children with ASD who have relatively large early productive vocabularies are likely to have relatively large later comprehension vocabularies, which in turn, should reduce the receptive disadvantage. These data are compatible with the results of an experiment that found teaching children with ASD new vocabulary through production methods tends to result in greater cross-modality generalization than teaching vocabulary through discrimination and direction-following (Wynn & Smith, 2003). Together, these findings suggest that production drives comprehension for children with ASD in the early stages of language development.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 80 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy