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2015 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 63 words || 
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1. Bruter, Michael. and Harrison, Sarah. "The electoral psychology of first time voters - contrasts between polling station voters and e-voters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Omni San Diego Hotel, San Diego, CA, Jul 03, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1012003_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents the results of a 6-country comparative experiment on first time voters, where first time voters were split between a polling station vote and an internet-based e-vote. We show how e-voting resulted in lower levels of efficacy, perceived representation, satisfaction, and ultimately in significantly reduced probability of voting again. We also show the impact of non-polling station voting on electoral choice.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 86 words || 
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2. Milyo, Jeff. "The Voter ID Mess: Estimating the Effects of State Voter ID laws on Voter Turnout and Self-Reported Voting Irregularities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360509_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: I analyze the effects of state voter ID laws on voter turnout from 2000-2008 using aggregate state-level data. I also analyze the effects of voter ID laws on self-reported voter turnout using the 2000-2006 CPS. Finally, I examine the effects of state voter ID laws on 'self-reported voting irregularities" using several different national surveys. Unllike previous work, i examine the within state effects of voter ID laws; further, I exploit the existence of differential ID requirements on first-time voters to help identify these within state effects.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 10611 words || 
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3. DeSipio, Louis., Masuoka, Natalie. and Stout, Christopher. "The Changing Non-Voter: What Differentiates Non-Voters and Voters in Asian American and Latino Communities?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p153415_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Asian Americans and Latinos are currently the fastest growing racial minority groups in the United States. Much of their population growth results from immigration. Thus, Asian American and Latino political incorporation faces additional challenges to White or African American political incorporation and involves, for many, ensuring the transition from non-U.S. citizen to U.S. citizen and, then, to voter. This paper explores the effect of immigration on the Asian American and Latino political behavior. Applying DeSipio’s (1996) model of new electorates, we disaggregate each population into four categories: non-naturalized immigrant adults, citizen adults not registered to vote, registered voter adults who did not vote, and voters. Using Current Population Survey (CPS) data from 2000 and 2004, we identify and compare the factors that differentiate the three non-voting categories from those who voted in each community. We find that Asian American and Latino political incorporation cannot be predicted solely on the basis of individual socioeconomic factors and that the factors that predict naturalization are, in some ways, distinct from those that predict voting. A more rigorous model of Asian American and Latino political incorporation must also account for influences related to immigration, state-level social context, and political institutions.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 4969 words || 
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4. Belanger, P.. and Eagles, M. "Multilevel Contextual Influences on Voter Turnout Partisan Cross-Pressure and Voter Turnout in Erie County, New York" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p42124_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The propensity of individuals to take part in the electoral process has long been associated with a variety of contextual influences. Variations in the partisan composition of local environments have been among those factors that researchers have used to explain differences in the propensity to vote. This paper proposes to explore whether geographic variations in the homogeneity/heterogeneity of a variety of group environments contributes to an explanation of voter turnout in Erie County, New York. Using voter registration and census information, we have assembled a multilevel dataset comprised of the voting records and demographic characteristics of a sample of registered voters (N=137,012) for roughly the last decade (1996-2004). To this, we have added information on the political heterogeneity of their households (N=72,646). Finally, using data for the 985 electoral districts in Erie County, we distinguish individuals whose partisan registration conforms to that prevailing in their district and all others. Using multilevel methods (HLM) with this data, we can simultaneously estimate the independent and joint effects on turnout of a variety of the nested contexts in which individuals practice their politics. Our analysis uncovers strong evidence that the homogeneous households reinforce participatory behaviors independent of the effects of the larger context.
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