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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 33 words || 
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1. Hudson, Jennifer L.. "Wage-Setting Institutions and Wage Inequality in the OECD: An Examination of the Effects of Liberalization of Wage-Setting Institutions and Membership in the EU and EMU on Wage Inequality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-01-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350425_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I examine the effects of liberalization of wage-setting institutions and EU, and expressly EMU, membership on wage inequality across 24 OECD countries (2000-2013) at three wage differentials, revealing critical intricacies in these relationships.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7966 words || 
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2. Pearce, Diana. "Lifting Low-Wage Workers Out of Poverty: An Analysis of Washington State’s Higher Minimum Wage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725426_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Does a higher minimum wage decrease poverty and income inadequacy? This paper presents research that explores this question using ACS data for Washington State. Given that Washington has the highest statewide minimum wage in the country, it is the best “test” case of whether a higher minimum wage can counteract negative wage trends in the labor market. Two types of analysis are done: the first describes minimum wage workers in Washington State, including workers indirectly affected (those with wages near but above the minimum wage), developing a profile of their characteristics (race/ethnicity, age, gender, etc.), and comparing them to higher-wage workers. Second, we reduce the earnings of minimum wage workers to the federal minimum wage, and examine the impact on household well-being, using the federal poverty measure and the Self-Sufficiency Standard. (The latter is a basic needs budget that reflects variation in family composition and geographic variation in the cost of living.) The findings provide a detailed picture of minimum wage workers, and also reveal the limitations of the federal poverty measure to adequately assess income adequacy and the impact of measures like the minimum wage to alleviate “working poverty”. As with other studies, we find minimal impact using the federal poverty measure; this contrasts with the much larger impact of the higher minimum wage on the Standard, thus demonstrating that the low “poverty” impact is more an artifact of the measure used.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 6753 words || 
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3. Pettit, Becky. "Employment gains and wage declines: The erosion of black women's relative wages through the 1990s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p23036_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Public policy initiatives in the 1950s and 1960s including Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity law have helped to mitigate explicit
discrimination in pay, and the expansion of higher education and training programs have advanced the employment fortunes of many women. By the early
1980s some scholars proclaimed near equity in pay between black and white women, particularly among young, highly skilled women. More recent policy
initiatives and labor market conditions have been arguably less progressive for black women's employment and earnings and through the 1980s and 1990s the
racial wage gap between black and white women widened considerably. This paper documents the racial wage gap among women in the U.S and examines the
extent to which demographic characteristics and institutional conditions affect selection into the labor force of black and white women. The paper
considers how the composition of the labor force affects estimates of the race gap in wages within the U.S. and discusses the persistence of racial
inequality in the labor market.

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6290 words || 
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4. West, Darrell. and Orr, Marion. "Redefining Poverty: Public Attitudes Toward Welfare, the Minimum Wage, and the Living Wage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p279421_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It is well-established that people have negative views about public assistance programs. At the same time, however, citizens are remarkably sympathetic towards the living wage and minimum wage. In this paper, we compare public attitudes towards various poverty amelioration activities. Using a public opinion survey of Northeastern city, we argue that the private sector focus of the living and minimum wages encourages popular support. Those who think the poor have genuine needs and that poverty is a big social problem are much more likely to support these remedies. By redefining poverty alleviation in a private sector framework, proponents reduce negative attitudes towards anti-poverty initiatives.

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