Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 8,812 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1763 - Next  Jump:
2006 - International Studies Association Words: 260 words || 
Info
1. Dias, Alexandra. "From Brothers War to Border War: An Interstate War in the Post- Cold War Era Ethiopia- Eritrea (1998-2000)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p99145_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Interstate wars are not one of the most salient features of current World Politics. Indeed, the prevailing patterns of post- Cold War Conflict reveal an increasing trend in intrastate wars that spill over borders. This paper aims to provide insights from an inter-state war in the post-Cold War era and hence contribute to the ongoing debate on the changing nature of warfare. The case-study provides evidence to contradict the strand of the literature which claims that we are witnessing a decisive transformation of warfare (Van Creveld 1991); (Kaldor 1999). Beyond the continuities with the 30 years civil war, namely in the relations between the Tigray People?s Liberation Front(TPLF) and the Eritrean People?s Liberation Front (EPLF), the 1998-2000 war was waged between the armed forces of two sovereign states. The paper highlights the value- added of the case- study to the debates on the transformation of warfare, on the patterns of warfare in Africa and on the dynamics of state formation in the South. This is one of the few cases of inter-state war in Africa. is a crucial contribution to comparative perspectives on the causation of intra-state (civil) wars and interstate wars in Africa and in other regions in the South. The central claim of this paper is that neighbours do fight over territory. Indeed, the paper will argue that territory is central to understand the causes, the conduct and the outcomes of the 1998- 2000 interstate war. The inability of either state to accept any territorial changes reveals that territory is central for the definition of the sovereign state.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 23 pages || Words: 10827 words || 
Info
2. Camilleri, Raphaelle. "From 'No Choice' to 'Wars of Choice': Why the Changing Nature of Israel’s War Aims Affects its Strategic Performance in War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416900_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since its impressive victory in the 1967 Six Day war, Israel has experienced growing difficulties in translating its military superiority on the battlefield into tangible political and perceptual gains. Paradoxically, Israel is militarily stronger today t

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 51 pages || Words: 17627 words || 
Info
3. McHugh, Kelly. "How Elected Leaders Prolong Unpopular Wars: Examining American Policy During the Vietnam War and French Policy During the Algerian War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501429_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I investigate the factors that cause democratic countries to exit peripheral wars. Specifically, I examine why it takes leaders so long to end these conflicts; in both cases I examine – France’s involvement in Algeria and the U.S.’ involvement in Vietnam – there is a significant time lag between the initial drop in public support for the war, and the eventual decision to withdraw. First, I outline the dominant explanations for retrenchment, which hold that rising casualties or policy failures will trigger a drop in public support for the war, and a policy change. I find that these theories do not provide correct predictions in either case study.

I use framing theory to develop an alternate hypothesis; I define a “frame” as a justification for involvement in a war. This theory predicts that an unpopular war will continue if a leader succeeds in reframing the policy debate, and offering the public a new justification for continued involvement. Framing theory offers predictions about the circumstances under which a leader can reframe a debate: frames are only likely to succeed when they are promoted by a credible leader, address issues that are salient to the public, and resonate with prevailing social beliefs.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 72 pages || Words: 21904 words || 
Info
4. Meiser, Jeffrey. "The Rhetoric and Reality of Civil War: From the American Civil War to the Iraq Civil War and Back Again" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253894_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The variety and frequency of analogical reasoning in the public discourse surrounding the invasion of Iraq is remarkable. Perhaps most remarkable is the comparison that has been made between the U.S. Civil War and the Iraq civil war. The purposes of this paper are to show why the American Civil War analogy was deployed by advocates of “staying the course” in Iraq, consider what effect this discursive strategy may have had on American policy in Iraq, and finally to compare the U.S. Civil War and Iraq civil war using an analytical framework derived from civil war theory. In moving toward achieving these goals, I employ cognitive and constructivist theories on the role of ideas in foreign policy, as well as theories of the causes of civil wars. The central findings have both academic and policy relevance. First, several Bush administration officials and certain public intellectuals have used the American Civil War analogy (and other rhetorical devices) to shape policy in the short-run and American collective identity in the long-run. Second, the U.S. Civil War analogy does not provide useful guidance for American policy in Iraq. Policy makers and analysts should not allow the memory of the American experience with internal conflict affect their understanding of current and future civil wars. Third, current theories of internal war can provide a useful lens for understanding both ‘old’ and ‘new’ civil wars, but are much better suited to explaining recent civil wars. This finding suggests that unlike international relations theory, internal war theories are time-bound. It is striking that modern theories of internal war cannot explain one of the most important civil wars of the past 200 years.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 11456 words || 
Info
5. Toft, Monica. "Population Shifts and Civil War: A Test of Power Transition Theory Population Shifts and Civil War: A Test of Power Transition Theory Population Shifts and Civil War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents a test of elements of Power Transition Theory (PTT) through an examination of types of demographic transitions against civil war. It divides population transitions into nine types and, from PTT logic, derives testable hypotheses. It also tests elements of PTT's rival, Balance of Power Theory (BPT). Although the logic of PTT seems appropriate to testing at the substate level, the results are mixed. Most states plagued by ethnic civil wars have stable populations (i.e. no transitions), yet three types of transitions stand out. Even here, however, PTT predicts violence in only one of these three types of transitions. BPT fares a bit better.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1763 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy