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2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 32 words || 
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1. Holmgren, Beth. "Stardom, Szmonces,and National Democrats: Warsaw Cabaret in the Late 1930s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1005620_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Warsaw cabaret in the late 1930s reflected the politics and culture of a troubled and turbulent time. Jewish? Nationalist? Modern? All of these elements will be examined here.

2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 87 words || 
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2. Biskupska, Jadwiga. "Nazi Occupation Policy in Warsaw and the Response of the Urban Elite" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1013381_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper will focus on the Nazi occupation policy in wartime Warsaw, and responses to it by members of urban elite. It will discuss a handful of members of the educated Warsaw elite, and examine their responses to Nazi occupation practices, first as commentators and then as participants in various conspiracies. The central aim is to trace how the ad hoc nature of Nazi policy vis-a-vis the Poles appeared "from the inside," in the eyes of the Warsaw elite who were initially targeted by it.

2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 121 words || 
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3. Garlinski, Jaroslaw. "The British and the 1944 Warsaw Uprising" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nov 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1005551_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Still an emotive issue for many Poles, the British refusal to send the Polish Parachute Brigade to Warsaw during the 1944 Uprising in that city deserves examination. I propose to review this decision both in terms of the political situation in Poland in the summer of 1944, as well as of actual military realities both in the UK and Poland. It is, I believe, a subject that fits well into the overall conference theme of ‘Fact’, given that so many people still view this issue through the prism of their emotions.

I have based most of my work on materials in the British National Archives in London.

I presented a similar paper at the PIASA conference in June 2014 in Warsaw.

2016 - Association for Jewish Studies 48th Annual Conference Words: 355 words || 
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4. Slucki, David. "“Veterans of our Destruction”: Survivors and the Immortalization of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Jewish Studies 48th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1158069_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: On 4 March 1963, President John F. Kennedy signed proclamation 3523, recognizing the heroism of the fighters of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and encouraging Americans to participate in memorial services commemorating their deaths. Two years earlier, New York Governor Andrew Rockefeller had issued a similar proclamation, establishing 19 April 1961 as “Warsaw Ghetto Day”. From the early 1960s, Jewish organizations renamed Times Square, “Warsaw Ghetto Square” around the anniversary of the Uprising.
By the 1960s, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was well established as the major symbol of Jewish resistance to Nazism and a counterpoint to the idea that European Jews marched to their deaths as passive victims. It was acknowledged by Jewish communities and American public officials as an event of great significance. Historians of Holocaust memory have long since established the centrality of the Uprising in Israeli Holocaust remembrance. Yet much less has been written on how central the Uprising was for American Jews and other Jewish communities. Moreover, historians have almost completely overlooked how and why survivors, in particular, focused their commemorative efforts on the Uprising.
In this paper, I will trace the ways in which survivors in the United States established the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising as a foundational narrative. Although most survivors had not participated in the Uprising, survivors sacralized the Uprising and its small band of partisans. Survivors who had served as partisans were lauded; those who were killed during the fighting immortalized. They did this in numerous ways. Through ceremonies, commemorations, publications, and monuments, survivor groups imagined the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising as sacred and its fighters as holy martyrs. They debated the most appropriate date to commemorate, lobbied public officials for recognition, and tried to build monuments in public spaces. Survivors weren’t the first or the only Jewish groups to elevate the Uprising to mythic status. But in the 1940s through to the 1960s, survivor organizations like the United Jewish Survivors of Nazi Persecution and the Warsaw Ghetto Resistance Organization privileged resistance narratives in remembering the Jewish experience during World War II. In doing so, they played a crucial role in formulating and promoting Holocaust memory among American Jews.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Kurjanska, Malgorzata. "Elite Conflict and Civil Society in 19th Century Kraków and Warsaw" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/UNKNOWN>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1121215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why does civil society emerge and what leads it to support inclusionary, democratic states in some cases and exclusionary, authoritarian regimes in others? Economic development approaches argue that capitalist development drives the emergence and self-organization of classes, leading to the development of autonomous and class-based civil societies and the consolidation of democratic states. State-centered approaches suggest that states, not markets, shape the character of associational life. This paper examines competing approaches to explaining the character of civil society. Through a comparative historical analysis of civil society development in the Russian-ruled Warsaw Governorate (1815-1915) and the Austrian-ruled Duchy of Kraków (1846-1914), it proposes an elite-centered explanation of civil society character. It argues that imperial policies, particularly of (1) ethno-cultural repression of the masses and (2) political marginalization of ethnic majority elites, shaped the potential paths of civil society’s development in Warsaw and Kraków. Yet it was elites’ interests— as molded by elites’ conflicts with state and non-state elites, and by economic transformations— that determined its actual character.

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