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2016 - ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Park, Julie., Dizon, Jude. and Malcom, Moya. "Complicating Community Cultural Wealth: Religion and Spirituality as Sources of Community Cultural Wealth and the Case for Religious/Spiritual Capital" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASHE Annual Conference: Higher Education and the Public Good, Hyatt Regency Columbus, Columbus, Ohio, Nov 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1159737_index.html>
Publication Type: Scholarly Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Building on Yosso’s (2005) cultural community wealth framework, we propose an additional component: religious/spiritual capital. We explain how religion and spirituality serve as sources for each of the six forms of capital originally delineated by Yosso, and provide evidence in support of religious/spiritual capital as a form of cultural wealth.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 238 words || 
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2. Kim, Bohyeong. "“Nobody Should Know I’m Doing Wealth-Tech”: The Rise of Personal Finance [Wealth-Tech] and the Struggle to Stay Middle-Class in South Korea" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1193833_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper examines the rise of popular investing in Korea after the IMF crisis of 1997. The IMF crisis sparked a boom by deregulating financial markets and disrupting secure employment. Thrown into a context of economic restructuring and flexible labor, the Korean middle-class—who had previously enjoyed upward mobility through wage labor—has been pressured to enact financial self-management, or what is known as ‘wealth-tech’ [chaeteku]. Wealth-tech became an everyday term after the IMF crisis, referring to techniques of personal finance and money-management, including investment in stocks, funds, and real estate.

I ethnographically explored a group of laypeople who bonded together to learn wealth-tech. They are a cohort group [referred to as ‘The Cohort’ hereafter] of the most successful wealth-tech seminar offered by a local financial ‘guru.’ I carried out participant observation as well as individual in-depth interviews over ten months in 2014-2015. My ethnographic engagement included monthly study meetings at which the members shared knowledge on wealth-tech and/or discussed which stocks to buy; gatherings; informal conversations over drinks; and a holiday group trip. By looking at how The Cohort consolidates the belief that finance can make you rich, I map out their struggle to remain middle-class while learning wealth-tech. Their struggle can be seen as a response to the paradox of the post-IMF-crisis era: the pressure to take care of one’s own financial security amid job insecurity and sociocultural judgments against money and speculation that prevail in Korean society.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7660 words || 
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3. Beckert, Jens. "Unearned Wealth. Discursive Structures and the Regulation of Wealth Transmission in France, Germany and the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108031_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The question how to regulate the bequest of wealth has been an issue of great controversy in modern societies over the last 200 years. In this paper I analyze the discursive structures of inheritance law debates in France, Germany and the United States. I argue in the first part that in each country a distinct sets of issues and arguments have developed that exercise a dominant influence over the perception of the problems associated with the transfer of wealth mortis causa and the strategies deemed feasible to solve them. These culturally framed “notions of property” remain stable over long periods of time and shape discourses on inheritance law. They equip actors with culturally legitimated patterns of justification for the support or opposition to specific measures. In the second part of the paper I look at the actual development of one important field of inheritance law, estate taxation. I will describe the enduring differences which developed with regard to inheritance taxation and ask how this institutional development can be explained. Considering the distinct discursive structure in each of the three countries, it is looked at the contribution of these cultural frames to the legal changes. This shall help to analyze institutional development within a pluralistic theoretical framework that acknowledges the influence of culture, but also considers functional demands as well as economic and social interests.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 47 pages || Words: 11554 words || 
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4. Yang, Ying. "Wealth Inequality: A Comparison in Housing Wealth Between" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305508_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this project, within the theoretical framework of assimilation and stratification, I employ the concept of wealth to study wealth inequality across Asian immigrant groups and inequality between Asians and non-Hispanic Whites. To carry out my study, I utilize the 2001 American Housing Survey is used to examine the effect of social contexts on racial and ethnic disparities in home equity for Asian immigrants. Then I employ the 5% PUMS data of the 2000 Census to explore diverse human capital as a cause of wealth inequality across Asian immigrant groups and between Asians and Whites. Due to the large number of Asian immigrants in the US, these issues will affect the economic and residential landscape of urban areas for the foreseeable future. The study also promises to be important to policy makers who are responsible for making urban development policy for years to come.

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