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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 5494 words || 
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1. Youn, Ted IlKoo., Arnold, Karen., Shandra, John. and Savitz, Mandy. "Who Has Become the Wealthy among the Best and the Brightest?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110903_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Do all collegiate achievers hold equally wealthy positions in society therefore become powerful in the end? Thirty-two American Rhodes Scholars are annually selected for academic excellence, exemplary character, and potential for leadership roles from their collegiate institutions. A central question asked in this paper focuses on the relationships among cultural capital, social capital (embedded resources in social networks) and status attainment of these exceptional achievers. Our analysis shows that neither the access to childhood cultural capital nor the influence of the prestige of baccalaureate credentials has contributed to acquiring better jobs and earning higher income. Oxford experience and social relations among Rhodes Scholars have not yielded significantly. We find, however, that professional school degrees and training particularly from law and medicine have substantially contributed their later socioeconomic standing. Finally, perhaps the most notable finding of this study is that the likelihood of getting better jobs and higher income is greatly enhanced by the aggregate of social networks and political resources mobilized by these high achievers. Reviewing across five historical cohorts of former American Rhodes Scholars from 1947 to 1992, the role of social capital and political ties in advancing their socioeconomic standing seems to have progressively increased. The study is based on the 2001 survey of 1100 Rhodes Scholars covering classes from 1947 to 1992 that yielded 875 respondents.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Words: 31 words || 
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2. Ponce de Leon, Christian. "Elites and Democracy: Is There a Wealthy Median Voter in Latin America?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p266860_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explain what is the political mechanism in place that explains elite-biased policies in the public provision of health care and education in Latin America.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 1 words || 
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3. Kendall, Diana. "One Giant Piñata to Whack? Media Representations of Misconduct among Corporate Elites and the Wealthy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 14767 words || 
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4. Rodney, Alexandra. "Wealthy Women Who Deserve Children: Media Framing of the Infertility Patient" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505430_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the course of recent history, infertility has been increasingly medicalized and is now considered a disease. As yet, little attention has been paid to media coverage of the typical infertility patient. This article asks how infertility patients are framed in articles from The New York Times, 1977 to 2009. The question of whether infertility patients are performing a “sick role” (Parsons 1951) or a “medical consumer role” (Sulik and Eich-Krohm 2008) is addressed. Findings indicate that infertility patients are framed as a homogeneous group of wealthy women who are equipped with resources suited to the consumer role, and whose special treatment-seeking skills will be rewarded with the conception and birth of a child. This representation of infertility patients is problematic, because issues of class and gender are obscured. Class and inequality are rendered invisible via the framing of privileged people as dealing with financial hardship, children as priceless, and the infertility treatment process as a meritocracy. Gendered responsibility for reproductive work is unquestioned via the depiction of women as solely responsible for decision-making, and possessing particular information gathering skills suited to the infertility project.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4556 words || 
Info
5. Perez, Anthony. and Boen, Courtney. "Racial Differences in Asset Accumulation among Wealthy Blacks and Whites" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p651176_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A wide body of research documents that, compared to Whites, Blacks and other people of color are less likely to achieve economic prosperity in the U.S. Little is known, however, about the ways in which wealthy Black and White Americans accumulate assets. Using more than 20 years of longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), this research examines whether wealthy Blacks and Whites benefit equally from gifts, inheritances, and other private transfers of assets. We find that being Black is associated with a 97.7% decrease in the odds of being in the top wealth quintile (p<0.001). Individuals who report receiving a gift or transfer are 53.3% (p<0.001) more likely than those who do not report gifts to be in the top 20% of wealth holders. Compared to Blacks who report receiving no gifts or inheritances, Whites with no gifts or inheritances are 43.01 times (p<0.001) more likely to be in the top 20% of wealth holders, and Whites who report receiving gifts or inheritances are 66.40 times (p<0.001) more likely than Blacks with no gifts or inheritances to be in the top wealth quintile. Conversely, Blacks who reported receiving gifts or inheritances had the same odds of being in the top wealth quintile as Blacks who did not receive any gifts. These findings suggest that the processes by which individuals gain access to the upper rungs of the wealth distribution are racialized, with Whites receiving significantly more substantive advantage from gifts and inheritances than Blacks.

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