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2011 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 146 words || 
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1. Combs-Schilling, Jonathan. "Weaving the Crusades: Entrelacement and Visual Poetics in Tasso's Liberata" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Hilton Montreal Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Quebec Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p481068_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While the field of Tasso studies has moved beyond old binaries of Ariosto versus Tasso to examine the extent to which Tasso at once adopted and effaced Ariosto's narratological strategies, the totem of Ariostan poetics--entrelacement--has not been similarly rehabilitated. Yet, when construed not simply as a symptom of romance but a mechanism for storytelling, interlacement is found to pervade Gerusalemme liberata. Tasso's usage at once resembles that of the Furioso (e.g., the juxtaposition of protagonists, the blurring of generic boundaries, etc.), but also profoundly alters the representational possibilities of epic by restructuring interlacement's mechanisms, as his characters--through their senses, movements and thoughts--interlace themselves. I will concentrate on the strategy of sight, highlighting its affinities with the emerging aesthetic of enargeia, to show that Tasso's simultaneous adoption and radical refashioning of interlacement presents a powerful instance of Tasso's liminal position in a time of great cultural transition.

2011 - North American Association For Environmental Education Words: 41 words || 
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2. Sheffield, Elise. "WEAVING THE FOUR STRANDS OF SCIENCE INTO WATERSHED INQUIRY" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Association For Environmental Education, Convention Center, Raleigh, NC, Oct 12, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p510696_index.html>
Publication Type: 20-Minute Traditional Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The National Research Council’s Four Strands of Science provides an excellent framework for helping teachers contextualize (and justify) watershed-related inquiry within curricular goals. Our nature center created an effective in-service model for ES & MS teachers based on the strands.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 100 words || 
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3. Balzano, Wanda. "Penelope and Her Sisters: Weaving Tradition and Modernity in Transnational Italian Settings" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p512871_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: From a feminist cultural studies perspective, I will analyze how Southern Italian immigrant women brought the art of embroidering with them and both transformed their role in the new society and promoted a mutual engagement between transnational communities. Their creative expressions also counteracted forms of inequality within society and family. They proved that the premodern and modern can exist together within feminist values, not only in material conditions but in philosophy and outlook. Employing the “minor” cultural value attributed to the “corredo” (hope chest), they importantly bridged cultural and local ideas of "home" with the global theories of cultural production.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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4. Mitten, PhD, Denise. "The Inherent Ecologist: Weaving Living Systems into Inquiry Ethics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719550_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Humans and nature have existed in direct interrelationship for most of the time humans have been on earth and continue to be linked in an evolutionary process. The paradigm of competition and dominance encourages a perception of a human and nature split and has influenced research at least since positivism. Living systems inquiry honors the embedded qualities of nature with humans. It conceptualizes and gives voice to the holographic and fractal relationships from cells to organisms and throughout all matter. Through living systems inquiry, humans regain and retain the value-of-belonging, including strengthening relationships with all beings and feeling a sense of place. We reinforce our understanding of the human nature interrelationship and interdependence. By highlighting a paradigm that weaves a collaboration with place into research, we learn from the earth, create knowledge, and bring an ethic of care into research methods, honoring the inherent worth of all beings.

2015 - The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Words: 255 words || 
Info
5. Maile, David. "He Moena Pāwehe Makana: Weaving Anti-Capitalist Resistance into Kanaka Maoli Critiques of Settler Colonialism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p987591_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Moena Pāwehe Makana, a makaloa sedge mat made by a master Ni‘ihau weaver named Kala‘iokamalino, is a Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiian) material artifact that voices an anti-capitalist protest to settler colonialism. This particular mat, also called the “Protest Mat,” illustrates the violent conditions of capitalism and (settler) colonization that Kanaka Maoli experienced in the 19th century. By deploying mo‘olelo (story), kaona (hidden meaning), and kū‘ē (resistance) as methodologies with a textual and discursive analysis of the Moena Pāwehe Makana, I argue that the mat signifies an Indigenous criticism of western political economic impositions upon Kanaka Maoli sovereignty, governance, and life. In this process, I suggest that the material artifact importantly represents Indigenous agency, self-determination, and activism in the face of elimination and genocide. Kala‘iokamalino plaited a message in ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language) onto the mat that venerates King Kamehameha I’s kingdom, governance, and law, asks to eliminate taxes on animals, and questions “the great cause for the decrease of the Hawaiian people” by inquiring “about the degradation that may be caused by western influence.” The explicit criticism in the mat’s text are emboldened insofar as the sedge material and pāwehe style, which were decreasingly cultivated as these mats became devalued by capitalist structures and ideologies, mark an implicit criticism of capitalism’s violence over ‘āina (land). As a makana (gift) to King Kalākaua in 1874, the mat’s materiality, text, and larger discourse offer an intervention into Native American and Indigenous studies by theorizing Kanaka Maoli anti-capitalist resistance to settler colonialism.

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