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2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 293 words || 
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1. Chang, LinChiat. and Krosnick, Jon. "Measuring the Frequency of Regular Behaviors: Comparing the “Typical Week” to the “Past Week”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116469_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Reports of behavioral frequencies are informative for gauging unemployment and crime rates, the epidemiology of illnesses, neighborhood and community service provision, transport infrastructure effectiveness, consumer behavior, government health resource allocation, and more. Hence, researchers often measure the frequency with which people perform behaviors that are executed regularly throughout their daily lives. Whereas some investigators have asked respondents about their behavior during a “typical” day, week, or month, others sought to describe the same sorts of behavior patterns by asking about the most recent day, week, or month. Because there are strong rationales and empirical evidence supporting both approaches, it is not obvious a priori whether questions about particular recent time periods will yield more accurate reports than questions asking directly about typical behavior patterns.

We compared the validity of “typical” week and “past” week reports from the 1989 National Election Study Pilot, in which respondents were randomly assigned to report TV news program and newspaper exposure during either a typical week or the past week. We also explored the possibility that differences between typical week reports and past week reports might vary with the education level of the respondent. The predictive validity of the measures was assessed using objective tests of current events knowledge and identification of political figures, as well as self-assessments of political knowledge. Convergent trends across four different dependent variables suggested that typical week reports were more accurate because they tended to be more representative and reliable than past week reports. The typical week questions consistently manifested superior predictive validity, especially among the respondents with at least some college education. Our findings also point to the importance of considering the interaction between exposure and attention when studying information acquisition. Limitations on the implications of our evidence will be reviewed.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Krosnick, Jon. and Chang, LinChiat. "Measuring Exposure to Political Information Through the News Media: Comparing Questions About Last Week and About the Typical Week" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59493_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social scientists often measure the frequency with which people perform behaviors executed regularly throughout their daily lives, but there is no standard approach to this measurement task: some investigators have asked respondents about their behavior during a “usual” or “typical” day, week, or month, whereas others sought to describe the same sorts of behavior patterns by asking about the most recent day, week, or month. This paper compares the validity of “typical” week and “past” week reports for assessing habitual behavior patterns using data from the 1989 National Election Study Pilot, in which respondents were randomly assigned to report TV news program and newspaper exposure during either a typical week or the past week. The predictive validity of the measures was assessed using objective tests of current events knowledge and identification of political figures, as well as self-assessments of political knowledge. The typical week questions consistently manifested superior predictive validity, especially among the most educated respondents.

2006 - XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies Words: 271 words || 
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3. MAKINO, IKUKO., MATSUDA, YOSHIO., Hirasawa, Kyoko., YONEYAMA, MARIE., SAKANO, JUNKO., OTA, HIROAKI. and Konishi, Yukuo. "The levels of maternal trait anxiety and to determine the stress hormone in pregnant women at 30 weeks of gestation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Westin Miyako, Kyoto, Japan, Jun 19, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p125071_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Abstract: Objectives : Our purpose was to study the levels of maternal trait anxiety and to determine the stress hormone in pregnant women at 30 weeks of gestation.
Methods : The study population consisted of 24 pregnant women who were admitted to the Obstetrical Clinic of Tokyo Women,s Medical University between October 1, 2004 and August 31, 2005. This protocol was approved by the Human Investigational Review Board for our University. Written agreement was obtained from all participants before this study. To assess maternal stress, we used the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and measured the stress hormone i.e. corticotropin releaseing hormone(CRH), adrenocorticotrophic hormone(ACTH), cortisol and chromogranin(CgA). Simultaneously, we measured fetal heart rate (FHR) pattern before and after the vibratory acoustic stimulation (VAS) and divided four response type:positive, triphasic, negative and non response. VAS was performed a single 3-second over the fetal vertex with (75Hz, 75 dB) after quiet phase.
Results : In state anxiety, response types after VAS were not significant in pregnant women with high and low anxiety. The response types after VAS were significant recognized in low trait anxiety (p< 0.01). On the other hand, the triphasic types were recognized in high trait anxiety (p< 0.05). The mean values of maximum acceleration in FHR after VAS was significantly lower in high trait than low trait anxiety (8.4 ± 2.1 vs. 17.6 ± 7.3 bpm, rspectively). The FHR response after VAS in pregnant women with high trait anxiety showed poor response and the rsponse pattern was recognised triphasic rather than normal response.
Conclusions : These findings suggest that the stress in pregnant women with high trait anxiety might influence FHR after VBS.

2009 - ACTFL Annual Convention and World Languages Expo Words: 49 words || 
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4. Rollmann, Marcella. "Maximizing Language Acquisition on a Four-Week Study-Abroad Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACTFL Annual Convention and World Languages Expo, San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA, Nov 19, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306243_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation follows the progress of a student on a study-abroad program in Germany through her diary entries, in which she describes and analyses her listening and speaking experiences. Participants will consider how these experiences agree or disagree with commonly held beliefs about language acquisition in a study-abroad context.

2011 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 742 words || 
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5. Waggoner, Jan. and McIntyre, John. "Week of Transition: Moving from Candidate to Professional" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Caribe Royale Hotel, Orlando, Florida, Feb 09, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p438331_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation describes the student teaching week of transition that is designed to help move the student teacher from teacher candidate to professional teacher. Held at the end of each semester, the Week of Transition includes a series of workshops and activities that provide the candidate with additional knowledge and skills to move into the classroom as an effective teacher.

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