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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Billups, Sarah Catherine. "Successful Weight-loss as Successful Health: Weight-loss Narratives and the Social Construction of Health" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120472_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This content analysis project explores how women create narratives of their weight-loss trajectories to make sense of how and why they chose to start losing weight, and how these narratives illustrate their embodiment of cultural ideals of health, wellness, and beauty. Analyzing the stories of non-celebrity women in lifestyle and fitness magazines such as HEALTH, SHAPE, Fitness, and Women’s Health helps illuminate how women define and discuss health and wellness. Health in the everyday, lived understanding encompasses more than the biomedical definition of bodily functioning, and is a social construction that ties bodily performance and appearance to morality, motherhood, personal responsibility, and mental and emotional health. Additionally, and a key preliminary finding of this project, weight loss often becomes a proxy for health because it marks an individual’s transition from an undesirable “unhealthy” state, which may include overweight appearance, lack of body competence, inability to participate in daily activities, or obesity-related disease, to a physical state that results in better quality of life. The findings in this project demonstrate how weight and health become culturally encoded on the body, thus affecting the lived experience because the body is the location where an individual experiences the social.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 9253 words || 
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2. Brickman, Jared., Liu, Shuang. and Silva, David. "“I’ve Lost the Weight, Now Feed Me Upvotes!”: Weight Loss Narratives in an Online Support Space and Strategic Impression Management for Garnering Social Support" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282263_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Online support communities are popular and growing. However, newer social interaction features like content aggregation and scoring through “likes” and “upvotes” have changed how people give and evaluate social support. This study used content analysis to identify the posting strategies and narratives used by members of the weight loss subreddit /r/loseit, which uses content aggregation. A negative binomial regression revealed which strategies and narratives resulted in the most engagement with the content.

2012 - AWP Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 306 words || 
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3. Rima, Brandi., Mercurio, Andrea. and Pula, Sara. "Controlling My Weight: Thin-Ideal Internalization, Weight Locus of Control, and Body Dissatisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AWP Annual Conference, Palm Springs Hilton, Palm Springs, CA, Mar 08, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550343_index.html>
Publication Type: POSTER
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The researchers investigated weight locus of control as a moderator of the relationship between thin-ideal internalization and body dissatisfaction. Results indicated significant interactions; however, the interaction effect was not in the predicted direction. Findings suggest that an internal weight locus of control may be protective for some women.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 413 words || 
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4. Stice, Eric., Yokum, Sonja. and Burger, Kyle. "Greater Reward Region Responsivity and Weaker Inhibitory Region Responsivity Predicts Future Weight Gain in Healthy-Weight Teens" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p960019_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: It is vital to elucidate neural vulnerability factors that increase risk for excessive weight gain, because extant obesity prevention programs rarely reduce risk for obesity onset and available treatments rarely lead to lasting weight loss. We tested the extent to which healthy weight adolescents who show greater reward region responsivity also show excessive weight gain over 3-year follow-up, as past studies have used small samples, short follow-up periods, and did not predict initial excessive weight gain. We also tested whether the predictive effects of greater reward region responsivity was specific to food reward, or also emerges in response to monetary reward.

162 healthy weight (M BMI=20.8 ±1.90) adolescents (M age=15.3, ±1.06) completed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms assessing neural responsivity to receipt and anticipated receipt of palatable food and monetary reward; BMI was assessed annually over a 3-year follow-up. Elevated activation to milkshake receipt in the caudate predicted future weight gain; elevated caudate activation correlated with how much participants worked to earn snack food. Less activation during milkshake receipt in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and lingual gyrus also predicted future weight gain; lower vmPFC activation correlated with impulsivity. Response to anticipated milkshake receipt and to receipt and anticipated receipt of monetary reward did not predict weight gain.

The finding that greater caudate responsivity to palatable food receipt predicted initial excessive weight gain provides support for the reward surfeit model of obesity, which posits that elevated reward region responsivity increases risk for overeating. Results suggest that reward region responsivity is specific to food reward. The evidence that lower vmPFC response to food intake predicted weight gain implies that lower responsivity of inhibitory regions also contributes to risk for overeating. These findings imply that a confluence of elevated reward region responsivity to palatable food and reduced responsivity of inhibitory regions to palatable food may increase risk for overeating, which leads to excessive weight gain. Given that aberrant reward region responsivity and deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to binge-eating, future research should test whether elevated binge-eating mediates the predictive effects documented in the present study. With regard to clinical implications, data suggest that cognitive reappraisal training, which has been show to increase responsivity of inhibitory regions and reduce responsivity of reward regions to food cues, might be useful in reducing binge-eating. Response training paradigms, which have been found to reduce intake of high-fat/high-sugar foods, which theoretically increase recruitment of inhibitory control regions in response to food cues, may also help reduce binge-eating.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7519 words || 
Info
5. Pavela, Gregory. and Wolfe, Joseph. "The Waning Association between Education and Weight at Higher Levels of Weight" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010389_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most research on the relationship between education and weight assumes that the strength of the association is constant across all levels of weight, yet there are good reasons to question this assumption on sociological and biological grounds. This research tests whether the association between education and weight differs by level of weight. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study (2006-2008), technician measured height and weight data from 13,419 individuals are analyzed using continuation-ratio models. Results suggest that the association between education and weight is strongest at lower levels of weight. Among females, education is significantly associated with a reduced likelihood of advancing to a higher weight among normal weight individuals (β1=-0.07, p<.01) and overweight individuals (β2=-0.02, p<.05) but not obese individuals (β3=-0.01, p=0.52). Among males, education is significantly associated with a reduced likelihood of advancing to a higher weight among overweight individuals (β2=-0.04, p<.01), but not normal weight individuals (β1=-0.02, p=0.07) or obese individuals (β3=-0.02, p=.18). This research suggests that the relationship between education and weight is more nuanced than is typically assumed in the literature.

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