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2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 227 words || 
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1. Coulombe, Simon. and Little, Brian. "Feeling good and doing well through personal projects pursuit: Some results on the dynamics of well-being and implications for promotion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006879_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Promoting well-being is a core value in community psychology. Reflecting the concern of community psychologists for providing opportunities for people to be heard concerning what they care about, the goal of the presentation is to illustrate how personal projects are useful integrative units for exploring the dynamics of well-being. Much research has been devoted to exploring well-being (Cowen, 1994; Keyes, 2014), revealing among other things that well-being is comprised of two components: hedonic (positive emotions: “feeling good”) and eudaimonic (self-actualization: “doing good”) (Vittersø, 2013). The typical quantitative measures used in this type of research, however, leave little place for participants to express what really matters in their life. In a different perspective, Little (2014) argues that well-being is embodied in the core personal projects that people find meaningful for themselves. We will present data from the Social Ecological Assessment Databank (SEAbank), a database that integrates 22 studies conducted by Little and his students. SEAbank includes more than 12,000 projects that 3,500 participants have reported in their own words and have appraised across an array of dimensions related to well-being. Results from latent class analysis reveal different profiles of personal projects, with distinctive patterns regarding the relative levels of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being that people experience through their pursuit. Our results emphasize the importance of considering personal projects for a nuanced, idiographic and contextualized understanding of well-being

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1532 words || 
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2. Peterson, Lindsey. and Ralston, Margaret. "Aging Well in an Aging World: Inequalities in Health and Well-being across the Life Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1378872_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The world’s population is aging, but quality of life in older adulthood is unequally distributed. Using measures of self-rated health and subjective well-being, we examine the individual and social factors that shape older adulthood in 56 countries. In addition to examining inequalities in health and well-being for older adults between countries, we examine the differences between older (50 and over) and younger adults (under 50) within countries. Aging well is not simply a fact of country wealth or personal income. We conduct multi-level analyses to see which individual factors (e.g. gender and education) and which country level factors (e.g. democracy, GDP) impact health and well-being, and how these differ across ages. The country with the highest levels of self-rated health for both older and younger adults is Nigeria, which has one of the shortest life expectancies (53 years). Overall, we find that older adults feel less healthy than younger adults, but older adults in the former Soviet Union feel much less healthy than their under-50 counterparts. The same is true for life satisfaction. Although older adults do not necessarily feel more dissatisfied with their lives than younger adults, they are much more dissatisfied in the former Soviet Union. Regression results show that Soviet status strongly impacts the health and well-being of older adults above and beyond their individual characteristics. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of how altered life-course expectations impacts aging.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 185 words || 
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3. Thongchinda, Sirichinda. "Moving Emotions in Thai Political Life: They Tie as Well as Tear; They Pull as Well as Push" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1187768_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper examines political unrest over recent decades to show us how much emotions and their relation to ethical obligations are governing Thai political life. For example, despite attempts to stop voting, the election on Feb, 2, 2014 showed nearly 90% of polling stations operated normally and voter turnout was almost 50% of 43 million eligible voters in Thailand What lies inside these numbers is emotions: hope, anger, happiness, rage, grievance, frustration, to name a few. The actions of emotions appeared in various forms, such as mob clashes, posting on social media, the divide within family, friends, the forms of silence and forms of realignment that take place among people who have different political stances. The more we realise how much emotions matter in politics, the more ignored, distorted or even excluded they are within the political sphere by various groups of people, no matter what their political standpoint is. And it leads me to a related question that I address - what is missed in a study of Thai politics based on depoliticised emotional dimensions and practice in relation to ethical claims?

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Meier, Adrian. "Neither Pleasurable nor Virtuous: Procrastination Links Smartphone Habits and Messenger Checking Behavior to Decreased Hedonic as Well as Eudaimonic Well-Being" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1232887_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Smartphones afford us constant access to communication, anytime and anywhere. However, habitually checking one’s mobile messages may often conflict with more important tasks, resulting in procrastination. Based on data from a daily diary study (N = 532), the present study investigates how smartphone uses contribute to the prevalence of procrastination in daily life. Moreover, the study extends prior research on connectedness and well-being by investigating the consequences of media-driven procrastination for the two central dimensions of well-being: hedonia and eudaimonia. Results from multilevel analyses indicate that both ‘push’ and ‘pull’ forms of smartphone checking mediate the effects of smartphone habits on procrastinatory behavior. Procrastination, in turn, negatively affects both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being by reducing daily experiences of accomplishment. This study is the first to link smartphone habits and messenger usage behavior to procrastination and uncovers the challenges for smartphone users to pursue both pleasure and virtue in everyday life.

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