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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Busch, Justin., Watson-Jones, Rachel. and Legare, Cristine. "Examining “naïve ecology” in Western and Non-Western populations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p954736_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A growing literature has demonstrated that, despite early evidence that children begin with an anthropocentric bias, degrees of anthropocentrism vary across cultures. For example, although urban children show a strong anthropocentric bias when reasoning about living things, children from less industrialized communities do not (Levin & Unsworth, 2013; Medin & Atran, 2004; Unsworth, Levin, Washinawatok, et al., 2012). Additional research has shown that ecological inferences increase with informal exploration of nature, and decrease with the population density of a child’s community (Coley, 2012). This research highlights the role of culture and environment in the development of naïve biological reasoning, and suggests that examining these issues cross-culturally and developmentally has the potential to increase our understanding of intuitive biological concepts in adulthood.

Two studies were conducted to examine children’s beliefs about the ecological system of their surrounding environment, and their understanding of humans’ place within this system. Data for both studies were collected cross-culturally, in an urban American city and on the island of Tanna, Vanuatu. Tanna is an island of approximately 200 square miles located in the South Pacific, with a population of around 29,000 people. Levels of industrialization are low on Tanna, and Western-style, formal education has only recently been introduced.

Study 1 (U.S.: N=58, Vanuatu: N=39) used a species relation task, which presented children, ages 5-13 years, with 25 pairs of pictures. Each picture pair depicted either a plant-plant pairing, a plant-animal pairing, or an animal-animal pairing. Children were then asked how the two organisms might go together. Responses were coded into six categories: ecological, taxonomic, morphological, utility, physiological, or non-explanatory. Results indicate that children in the U.S. provide a greater number of taxonomic responses than children in Vanuatu, F(1, 93)=88.32, MSE=6.71, p<.01, and children in Vanuatu provide a greater number of utility responses than children in the U.S., F(1, 93) = 14.23, MSE=1.86, p<.01. Study 1 also revealed developmental differences; the data show a main-effect of age in ecological reasoning, with older children providing a greater number of ecological responses than younger children, F(1, 93)=22.06, MSE=14.89, p<.01.

Study 2 (U.S.: N=56, Vanuatu: N=50) used a nature categorization task, which presented children, 6-11 years old, with 12 pictures, which included plants, animals, non-living natural-kinds, one human artifact, and one human. Children were asked to sort the pictures into groups and those groups were then used to construct two independent spatial models (MDS), one for the U.S., one for Vanuatu. The MDS reveal a number of similarities between children’s groups in the U.S. and Vanuatu such that both cultures exhibit four distinct quadrants: a quadrupedal, mammal quadrant, a flying animal quadrant, a plant quadrant, and a non-living objects quadrant.

Results from both Studies 1 and 2 extend our knowledge of the development of naïve ecological reasoning in two distinct cultural contexts. We find that the way children come to understand the ecology of their local environment is heavily influenced by how they interact with it, and the type of ecological knowledge that is emphasized within their cultural ethos.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 122 words || 
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2. Lee, Sang-Hwan. "An Examination on the International Anti-Corruption Issues: Conflict and Harmony of Western and Non-Western Perspectives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181107_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the paper I would like to deal with international anti-corruption issues in the perspectives of international political economy such as interdependence, dependence, and statist theories. My research focuses on the comparative analysis of two different regions-western region such as North America & West Europe and non-western region such as Asia & Latin America concerning about international anti-corruption issues. In the research I want to answer to the three issues: ⑴ similarities and differences of western and non-western views in the field of international anti-corruption, ⑵ prospects and programs of forming international anti-corruption regimes, and ⑶ policy alternatives of Northeast Asian countries responding to the regime formation. To deal with the issues I will utilize empirical methods including qualitative and quantitative techniques.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 10980 words || 
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3. Zhou, Lijie. and Shin, Jae-Hwa. "Does Stealing Thunder Work? A Content Analysis of Crisis Communication Strategies and Public Responses of Stealing Thunder and Nonstealing Thunder Cases in Western and Non-Western Cultures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986116_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The content analysis of six paired stealing thunder cases that an organization steals thunder and breaks the news about its own crisis and non-stealing thunder cases in Western and non-Western cultures offered some insight into effective crisis communication strategies. This study specifically examined the differences between stealing thunder cases and non-stealing thunder cases in terms of crisis communication strategies, news frames and public responses and emotions. The comparison results from the each set of paired crisis cases indicated that stealing thunder strategy may not always work in the same way and have the same power under the different cultural settings.

2008 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 188 words || 
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4. Perry, Luke. and Girard, James. "From Western Mass to Western Nebraska: Teaching American Government Across Sub-Cultures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276596_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper was inspired by experiences teaching American government for three years in a predominantly liberal setting and then teaching American government for three years in a predominantly conservative setting. During this time, it became abundantly clear that understandings of American government and current events vary depending on the sub-cultural orientations of students. The purpose of this paper is to examine different pre-conceptions and attitudes that students of higher education bring to introductory courses in American Government and what professors can do to better adapt and enhance teaching effectiveness.

The project consists of American government classes from different schools and regions reading excerpts from The Iraq Study Group Report and The Audacity of Hope, circling unfamiliar terms, and writing their own understandings of selected terms in the works. This will generate quantitative data on how well students understand basic government terms and generate qualitative data on the patterns of understanding that emerge across different regions of the country. Relevant conclusions will provide insights on what students know, how they think across sub-cultures, and what professors can do to incorporate sub-cultural considerations into teaching American Government more effectively.

2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 89 words || 
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5. Govindnathan, Pallavi. "Decolonizing the Male Gaze in Western Art History: Revisiting Neolithic Art to Challenge Western Artistic Patriarchal Representations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1140994_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: My presentation highlights the work done by art historian Mary Garrard on how to decolonize the male gaze in Western art. In doing so, I address “how...the processes of sexual differentiations [are] played out across the representations of art and art history,” especially given the growing number of female artists represented in the art world today (Broude and Garrard 1). I emphasize that by studying pre-patriarchal Neolithic artistic symbols, much of Western artistic symbolisms can be challenged and be given new interpretations, becoming tools for resisting artistic male imaginaries.

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