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2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 264 words || 
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1. Rippere, Paulina. "Issues and Their Influence: The National Bank, Slavery, and the Demise of the Whigs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During the mid-19th Century, the Whig Party held a majority in Congress, had two candidates elected president, and established a growing base of support at the national level. However, after twenty years of existence the party experienced a total collapse. Although scholars have sought to explain why the Whig Party collapsed using historical references and analyses of some quantitative data, the literature lacks an overarching theory which identifies factors that have influenced the success and defeat of political parties across history. In this paper, I begin to develop such a theory. Broadly, I argue that “campaigning issues,” or issues party elites rely on to win elections and achieve a majority in Congress, do not necessarily sustain the party once its members obtain power and are charged with running the government. Instead, leaders must turn to another set of issues, those I call “governing issues,” to maintain their power. Using the Whig Party as a case study, I performed a content analysis of several contemporary newspapers and developed an original dataset which measures the salience of major issues of the time. I show that the decline in the discussion of the National Bank and internal improvements and the rise in the discussion of slavery during the 1830s and 1840s contributed to the collapse of the Whig Party at mid-century. More importantly, this paper draws a connection between the public discussion of salient issues and the performance of political parties, a concept which may be used to understand party development across history.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Kukathas, Chandran. "The Tory Consequences of Whig Foundations:Hume’s Critique of the Social Contract" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1118112_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In his political essays, David Hume warns against giving credence to the claims either of the Tories, who traced the legitimacy of government up to the Deity, or of the Whigs, who founded political authority on an original contract. Neither justification he considered plausible, and both, he maintained, were self-serving. The purpose of this paper is to revisit Hume’s argument, first to elaborate his critique of social contract theory, but more particularly to show why the appeal to an original contract arguments is of a piece with a reliance upon theological foundations. To the extent that modern liberals propose contractarian foundations of political authority their theories carry as much weight as appeals to the will of God.

2007 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 33 pages || Words: 10901 words || 
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3. Siemers, David. "Leading the People Away from the Presidency?: Paradoxes of the Whig Inaugurals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, La Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, Mar 08, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p176243_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: An inaugural address allows the president and the presidency to stand out in bold relief--precisely what the Whigs suggested they did not want, but they delivered inaugural speeches anyway. How the Whigs used their inaugurals was thus a paradox. They used the bully pulpit to lead people away from the presidency. They also offered suggestions in these speeches which undermined the Whig preference for a limited executive. While the irony of the Whig presidents not living up to their commitments has been noted by scholars, the leading authorities on the Whigs have not acknowledged that the seeds of this paradox were embedded in the Whig inaugurals themselves. This paper makes that point.

2008 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 127 words || 
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4. Taylor, Quentin. ""'The True Principles of Government': William Henry Harrison and the Whig Counter-Revolution"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Beyond his military victories on the frontier, William Henry Harrison is best remembered as the president who died a month after taking office. Discussions of his presidency invariably focus on the fatal illness he contracted while delivering his inaugural address -- the longest ever -- in the bitter cold. The address itself, one of the most extraordinary and bizzare state papers in U.S. history, has almost entirely escaped the notice of historians and political scientists. Harrison proposed nothing short of a constitutional revolution that would have reduced the chief executive to a mere figurehead. This paper explores Harrison's theory of the Whig presidency, a radical (and overlooked) innovation that aimed to fundametally alter the role of the chief executive and reconfigure the institutional framework of the Constitution.

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