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2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 51 pages || Words: 14300 words || 
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1. O'Keef, Andreea. "Whose Greed, Whose Grievance, and Whose Opportunity? Foreign Direct Investment and Civil Conflict" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501883_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The literature on the economic causes of civil conflict has so far ignored the role of foreign direct investment (FDI). This paper begins to fill this gap. A closer look at the effects of FDI on the processes of political violence is justified by the foreign investors’ potential for a two-fold impact: economic and political. On the one hand, investors wield the power to transform the economies of developing countries, thus changing economic inequalities and creating opportunities for grievance and for greed among domestic groups. On the other hand, investors themselves are strategic players with the goal to maximize profits and the ability to alter their environment through political channels. Still, only investors in some economic sectors have both the incentives and the ability to exercise political power in their host states. This paper investigates how the strategic interaction between foreign investors and host country actors influences the probability of civil conflict. It identifies the types of FDI that are likely to alleviate the risk of civil conflict, as well as those investments that exacerbate it. A new data set of industry-level FDI flows allows for the empirical evaluation of the argument.

2017 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 92 words || 
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2. Ma, Zhiying. "Whose Rights, Whose Wrongs?: Mad Politics between Biopolitical Paternalism and Ordinary Maternalism in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1269560_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Drawing on long-term fieldwork on families’ involvement in mental health care and management in China, this paper examines the politics of rights claiming and blame assigning during the recent mental health legal reform. I will show that human rights activists used an ableist logic to reject any interventions to the rights-bearing individual. This approach ignored people’s vulnerability, needs for dependency, and the structural inequality of resource access, thereby paving the ground for neoliberal state retraction. I will end the paper by considering future directions of mad politics in China (and possibly elsewhere).

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9248 words || 
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3. Holton, Avery., Coddington, Mark. and Gil de Zuniga, Homero. "Whose news? Whose values? Citizen journalism and journalistic values through the lens of content creators and consumers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p582264_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As user-generated content and citizen-driven forms of journalism have risen to prominence alongside professional media production, they have presented a challenge to traditional journalistic values and processes. This study examines that challenge from the perspective of the creators and consumers of citizen-driven news content, exploring their perceptions of citizen journalism and the professional tenets of good journalism. Through a nationally representative survey of US adults, this study finds that citizen journalism consumers hold more positive attitudes toward citizen journalism, but do not show a significant identification with professional journalistic values, while general news consumption is positively related with affirmation of professional journalistic values. Compared with consumption, content creation plays a relatively insignificant role in predicting attitudes toward citizen journalism and the professional tenets of good journalism. Implications for understanding the changing perspectives of news creators and consumers are discussed.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12401 words || 
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4. Fahlberg, Anjuli. "Whose Truth? Whose Interests? Multiple Standpoint Epistemology and Participatory Action Research in Studies of Urban Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379461_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While studying marginalized populations is a critical task for sociologists, there is extensive debate about how to do this. What does it mean to construct “truth” about the “subaltern”? And how do we do so without further exacerbating unequal relations of power? These questions become amplified in the context of poverty and violence, where research participants experience multiple, overlapping forms of risk and vulnerability. In this paper, I address these epistemological and ethical concerns by proposing a research model that draws on participatory action research to level power relations between researcher and participants in both the production of knowledge and the benefits of the research process. The model extends feminist theory to propose a “multiple standpoint epistemology,” in which the perspectives of people from varied positions of power are incorporated into the construction of “truth.” It calls for a creative and reflexive incorporation of participatory action research principles. I then provide a case study of this model by describing a mixed-methods research project I conducted in the City of God, a low-income neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro that has experienced extreme violence from local drug traffickers and state police forces since the 1970s. I conclude by arguing that although feminist epistemology and participatory research remain on the sidelines of sociological theory and methods, this approach is vital to expanding the quality and quantity of data, particularly in the study of urban violence.

2015 - Advocating for the Silenced: The Educators’ Vocation Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Hicks, John. "Whose Social Justice? Whose Rationality?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Advocating for the Silenced: The Educators’ Vocation, Hyatt Regency Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, Feb 13, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p929956_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This session is focused on the variety of meanings the term "social justice" has in the USA and, in particular, for teacher educators.

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