Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 168 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 34 - Next  Jump:
2014 - Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting Words: 170 words || 
Info
1. Nordlof, Sarah. and Kline, Richard. "Wildlife Species Associations at Future Wildlife Crossing Locations in South Texas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Texas A&M Galveston Campus, Galveston, TX, Mar 07, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p729513_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Habitat destruction and fragmentation are two of the largest threats to wildlife habitat in South Texas. Maintaining connectivity of fragmented habitat plays a key role in the management of wildlife in the United States. Wildlife crossings are one of the most efficient strategies to combat fragmentation of habitat. Widening and installation of wildlife crossings on Farm-to-Market Road 106, a rural road with moderate human disturbance near Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, is planned for 2014. Camera traps were used to analyze ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and bobcat (Lynx rufus) use of habitat at future wildlife crossing locations to test the hypothesis that presence of certain wildlife species and habitat characteristics can predict ocelot and bobcat presence. The wildlife crossing sites were compared to reference sites with minimal human disturbance. Sites were characterized by species presence and habitat characteristics in order to develop a predictive model for ocelot and bobcat presence. The results of this study will aid in decisions for placement and enhancement of future wildlife crossings in a human-dominated landscape.

2008 - International Congress for Conservation Biology Words: 215 words || 
Info
2. Samuel, Ajonina. "IMPACT OF HUNTING AND BUSHMEAT TRADE ON WILDLIFE BIODIVERSITY LOSS IN CAMEROON: A CASE STUDY OF BANYANG-MBO WILDLIFE SANCTUARY" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN, Jul 10, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p239631_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: The Banyang-Mbo Wildlife Sanctuary is a multi-use lowland tropical rainforest in southwestern Cameroon designated by Cameroon government to protect 11 species including the most endangered primates in Central and West Africa Mandrillus leucophaeus and Pan troglodytes. Local communities maintain user-rights of forest and natural resources as long as conservation goals are not compromised. Over 55 villages within sanctuary area exert hunting pressure on wildlife for dietary requirements and income source. A seven month study was conducted to assess current impact of hunting pressure on wildlife biodiversity loss with hope to recommend managed sustainable hunting system to Forestry and Wildlife ministry. Carcasses of animals from daily hunt of 84 hunters were weighed, sexed and aged. Socio-economic data on weapon type, use, price of each animal killed and destination was recored in the 14 study villages. Hunters were interviewed in an attempt to understand hunters' perception of hunted game and their capacity to implement a managed hunting system. 33 species were harvested, 3,176 individual animals with total biomass of 22,400.43kg killed. Placeing into taxonomic groups, duikers 34% and rodents 22% were most affected. Hunting might be unsustainable as indicated by a decline in yield over time. Mandrillus leucophaeus and Pan troglodytes face risk of local extinction. I recommend alternative income sources like cottage industries.

2014 - ASEH Conference – San Francisco Words: 232 words || 
Info
3. Okech Oyugi, Willis. "Wildlife Conservation and Human-Wildlife Contestations in Kenya’s Maasailand, 1980-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Conference – San Francisco, Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p679858_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The persistence of human-wildlife conflicts in and around two of Kenya’s foremost wildlife reserves, Amboseli and Maasai Mara, between 1980 and 2000 recasts debates over the potential of community-based wildlife sanctuaries to alleviate these contestations. As a result of intense local and international lobbying for the government recognize those living around wildlife reserves as stakeholders in wildlife conservation endeavors, this period witnessed the proliferation of community-run private wildlife-based tourism facilities and sanctuaries bordering these two reserves. These undertakings were largely premised on the rationale that alongside a perceived timeless and sustainable indigenous ‘conservation ethos’, wildlife-derived revenue would mitigate against losses to Maasai livestock and go a long way in alleviating human-wildlife conflicts.
As had been the case in the run-up to Kenya’s independence, wildlife was promoted as a resource rather than a threat to local livelihoods. Yet underestimated was the widespread economic diversification by the Maasain including into large-scale commercial and sedentary agriculture. Equally underestimated, and masked by the romanticized notion of the Maasai as paragons of ecological virtue, were the commonplace human-wildlife contestations that have traditionally marked their relations with nature. Marked by increased land individuation, these events exacerbated human-wildlife conflicts and led to alarming declines in large mammal populations. This paper reexamines the compatibility of traditional and formal conservation ethos to highlight the long-held assumption in environmental debates that African development and wildlife conservation are mutually exclusive.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 33 words || 
Info
4. Carpenter, Stefan. "How Effective is Community-based Wildlife Governance?: A Cross-national Evaluation of the Impact of Community-based Wildlife Conservation on the Protection of the African Elephant" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350829_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Debate exists over the efficacy of community-based wildlife conservation. This paper uses elephant poaching data to assess the relative impact of community-based and nationalized conservation approaches across 39 observation sites in 20 countries.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 34 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy