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Showing 1 through 5 of 64 records.
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2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 176 words || 
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1. Chaudhuri, Soma. "In Search of a “Credible” Witch: Contemporary Witch Hunts in the Tea Plantations of India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 03, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p372627_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using qualitative data from forty in-depth interviews, this paper attempts to explore two levels of analysis on contemporary witch hunts. The first level of analysis is focused on gender and the victim of witch hunt. The questions that this paper attempts to answer are: Who is defined as a “witch” in the community, and how does gender play a role in the identification? What characteristics define a credible deviant? The second level of analysis is focused at the broader community, and its reaction on witch hunts. I use the concept of “dual deviance” and Stinchcombe’s (1968) analysis on the logic of functional explanation adapted by Jensen (2007) to explain witch hunts. In tribal societies threat to society and some of its members can occur in the form of diseases or illnesses. This undermines security in the society, and elicits a response in hunting for a scapegoat that would take the blame for undermining the stability in the community. The scapegoat takes the form of witches, and the fear displacing response takes the form of witch hunts.

2016 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Words: 150 words || 
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2. Wanninger, Jane. ""Enchanting Words": Witches, Women, and Interrogation in The Late Lancashire Witches" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1048802_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In 1633, a Lancashire boy accused twenty individuals of witchcraft; most were convicted, and at least one woman confessed to the crime. By the following summer, the boy recanted his accusation under pressure from the Crown, though the women remained imprisoned. Heywood and Richard Brome’s 1634 play The Late Lancashire Witches dramatizes this real world case through a blend of festive comedy and domestic tragedy that places the agency of women—as wives and witches alike—squarely on trial. As women are interrogated in various ways throughout the play, a tension emerges: though the process of interrogation asks them to speak for themselves, these exchanges are inevitably shaped by generic expectations of plot and social convention. This paper traces that tension, arguing that generic and performative self-awareness plays a key role in women’s agency in these scenes and revealing the link between witchcraft and domestic tragedy for women on trial.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7640 words || 
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3. Gatchet, Roger. "A Hystery of Witch-Hunting: Witch-Hunt Tourism and Public Remembrance in Salem, Massachusetts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p191359_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This essay explores what witch-hunting has come to mean in the context of the burgeoning tourist industry in present day Salem, Massachusetts. Specifically, I show how the dominant narratives of touristic texts in Salem disguise the complex relationships between patriarchy and gender, and capitalism and violence. I also examine Salem tourism as a site of struggle and counter-memory.

2014 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 152 words || 
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4. Krause, Virginia. "Becoming a Witch: Confession and Subjectivity in the Trial of the Marlou Witches (1582–83)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, New York, NY, Hilton New York, <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p677629_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: At the core of early modern French demonology was an intertwining of judicial and epistemological uses of confession, the demonologist’s tool of choice when it came to identifying witches (members of a conspiratorial secret society) and piercing the mysteries of witchcraft (the unseen world of demons and their earthly agents). The demonologist was driven by his will to know: his reliance on a two-pronged prosecutorial and truth-seeking confessional apparatus. In this paper, I propose to examine this process from the point of view of the “witch” — someone accused by neighbors and interpellated to speak as a witch in the course of a trial. I will track the process of becoming a witch through one case study by studying the trial records from a 1582–83 witchcraft trial in central France. Witchhood, I argue, falls in a shadowy grey zone of delegation of agency, virtual deeds, and reversibility (from witch to bewitched).

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 8035 words || 
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5. McSwain, Megan. "Warriors and Witches: Cinematic Constructions of Navajos in "Windtalkers" and "Skinwalkers"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p671084_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Analyzing Native Americans in a narrower approach, this study focuses on one tribe. This paper deconstructs the discourses used to define Navajos in the 2002 films Windtalkers and Skinwalkers. Both films are found to portray images of Navajos as the Other, Navajos as devices, Navajo religion as superstition, Romanticized Navajos, and Corrupted Navajos. While the films attempt to depict the Navajo as a distinct tribe, Native American stereotypes are still prevalent in the twenty-first century.

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