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2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 4569 words || 
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1. Akiyoshi, Mito. "Women Are Women Are Women? : The Effects of Tertiary Education on Japanese Women’s Employment Status and Career Aspirations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183943_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Statistics indicate a wide gap in educational attainment between men and women in Japan, particularly in comparison with other industrialized countries.
Data supports that in Japan, women who settle on a "pink-collar" career often attain higher economic standing through marriage than those who accept a traditionally male-dominated professional job. There exists a perception that investment in human capital is not a rational choice for women given the persistent gender inequality in the labor market. But the picture of gender-imbalanced educational participation has been changing over the past few decades. The college enrollment rate for women doubled between 1992 and 2004 from 17% to 35%. What are the implications of the increase of college-educated women for labor relations? How do female workers with tertiary education differ from their colleagues with high-school diploma or less? Using a high-quality dataset collected by the Japanese government, the present study finds that women with college education differ markedly from women with lower educational attainment in their employment status and career aspirations. At the same time, the present study also finds that the effects of variables that have been associated with women's lower labor market participation rates are present for college-educated women as well.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 337 words || 
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2. Andersen, David. and Ditonto, Tessa. "When Women Run, Some Women Lose: Electoral Outcomes When Women Run Concurrently" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1257455_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous research has shown that women may not face the same electoral playing field as men. Much experimental evidence suggests that women are often stereotyped by voters and must work harder to demonstrate their competence, capability and leadership, but that they are also viewed as better able to handle certain issues, such as poverty and education. At the same time, real-world studies of electoral outcomes find that women are no less likely to win their races than men are. Further, more recent experimental and survey-based evidence has found that gender either has little significant effect on women’s electoral fortunes or that the extent to which stereotypes matter is context-dependent. To the extent that women face unique challenges when running for office, then, it seems that those challenges are nuanced and contingent.

In this vein, our prior experimental research has shown that when women run for office concurrently, voters tend to be affected by the overall number of women they see on the ballot. As more women appear on the ballot simultaneously, voters decrease their ratings for each individual woman they see, and particularly for those running for lower offices, where voters tend to have less individualizing information about the candidates. But does this happen in the real world too?

This paper seeks to replicate our experimental work by looking at real world election results. Using 2016 election data this paper looks at how women candidates fared across the United States based upon how many other women appeared on the ballot. 2016 was of course the first American election where everyone in the nation saw a woman appear on the ballot for president, but our concern is for the fate of all the other women who ran below Hillary Clinton’s name, particularly Democratic women. If our experimental work replicates, we expect to see that there is a greater drop-off in the vote totals received by Democratic women candidates than observed for Democratic men, and that these effects are even stronger in states where women ran for multiple offices.

2014 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9046 words || 
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3. Reynolds, Chelsea. and LoRusso, Susan. "The Women’s Magazine Diet: A Content Analysis of Nutrition and Fitness Articles in Women’s and Women’s Health Magazines" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada, Aug 06, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744223_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This content analysis quantifies frames, topics, and sources in fitness and nutrition articles (n = 423) published by women’s magazines (Cosmopolitan, Redbook, and Glamour) and women’s health magazines (Health, Shape, and Self) as defined by Standard Rate and Data Service. It also compares frames, topics, and sources against focuses of magazines’ mission statements (health, beauty/fashion, and lifestyle/hybrid). Chi-squares demonstrate there are statistically significant differences in content by magazines’ SRDS genre but not by mission statements.

2006 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6117 words || 
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4. Fiber, Pamela. and Arsneault, Shelly. "Healthy Represntation, Healthy Women? Women State Legislators and Women's Health Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mar 17, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97743_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Feminist literature often discusses the importance of descriptive representation of women to facilitate democracy. The vital role of women in elected office is further substantiated by research that finds the representation of women’s “interests” requires a greater inclusion of women leaders in public office. Currently, a record number of women serve in elected office at the state and national levels. In 2005, 25.5 percent of state elective executive office holders, 22.6 percent of state legislators were women, and 29.7 percent of top appointed policymakers in the states were women. Furthermore, the gap between Democratic and Republican women is increasingly closing as more Republican women run and win elective office. As the ideological composition of women in office changes, research focusing on the representation of ‘women’s issues’ must be attentive to the changing definitions of women’s issues and women serving in office generally. For example, there is evidence that in states with higher percentages of women, legislatures are more attentive to women’s health issues. However, these studies typically include abortion policy as a prominent “woman’s health issue.” This is problematic for obvious reasons including the growing ideological diversity of women who serve in public office and the moral dimensions of abortion. Therefore, new measures of state provisions of women’s health, including contraceptive services, pre- and post-natal care, and testing and care of breast and cervical cancer patients may be better indicators of the relationship between women in elected office and state attention to women’s issues.
Utilizing state level data on provision of services directed towards the health of women and representation of women in the 50 states, we explore how well the new guard of women representatives serve the interests of all women. We find that states with a critical mass of women in the state legislature are more attentive and have better over health measures than states with the fewest number of women in the state legislature.

2010 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 80 words || 
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5. Fehlbaum, Amanda. "Blogging in the Margins: Women of Color, Disabled Women, and Fat Women’s Engagement with Feminism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, CO, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p428798_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Feminists are increasingly turning to blogs to make and shape feminist analysis. Likewise, blogs are a gateway of expression for marginalized women. Women of color, disabled women, and fat women utilize blogs to share their experiences and challenge dominant/hegemonic stories and histories. These women’s blogs prompt difficult dialogues and help articulate the barriers to working across difference in contexts of marginalization. The usefulness of marginalized women’s blogs in obtaining a wider view of engagement (or disengagement) with feminism is examined.

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