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2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7517 words || 
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1. Okechukwu, Cassandra., Kelly, Erin., Sembajwe, Grace. and Berkman, Lisa. "“They work, work, work”: Work-Family Policies & Practices in Nursing Homes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505460_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on work-family policies abound, but most studies have focused on white-collar workers and settings or utilized nationally representative samples that generalize across populations of workers and organizations. Scholars lack detailed understanding of the dual management of paid work and family care work by low-wage workers, and know little about how employers of low-wage workers have responded to work-family issues. The racial/ethnic stratification of occupations implies that research on white-collar workers provides information primarily on white, native-born workers. We extend the previous literature on employers’ work-family policies by analyzing qualitative data on formal policies and management practices in four nursing homes with racially diverse and immigrant workers. Although a number of policies are officially available, there is clear evidence of decoupling of policy and everyday practice. We identify two reasons for this decoupling. First, there is a mismatch between the policies and management’s desire to maintain control over staffing practices and meet company goals regarding labor costs; this source of decoupling is related to findings in previous studies. Second, there is a mismatch between the policies and workers’ needs, as understood by their supervisors. These low-wage workers often try to maximize their income – even when that means less family time – so the work-family policies common in other organizations are viewed as unhelpful or irrelevant. This analysis confirms the essential role of managers as gatekeepers for workers wishing to utilize family-supportive policies but also documents that some managers creatively exploit decoupling of policy and practice to benefit or hinder workers.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8741 words || 
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2. Gronewold, Katherine. and Wenzel, Kristina. "I Work to Live, Not Live to Work: How Generation Y Talks About Work, Career, and Work-Life Balance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368332_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the meanings that members of Generation Y prescribe to the concepts of work, career, and work-life balance and how these meanings will influence the workplace using the perspective of Jablin’s (1982) organizational assimilation. Findings suggest that members of Generation Y assess having a career more positively than "just working". Additionally, work-life balance is a priority, but one that many members of Generation Y do not feel is entirely achievable.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6366 words || 
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3. Wright, Kevin. "Work-Related Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and Work Life Balance: The Influence of New Communication Technologies on Perceived Work Life Balance, Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Intention to Leave the Organization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635107_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate employee perceptions of the influence of new communication technologies on perceptions of work life balance, burnout, intention to leave the organization, and job satisfaction. An on-line survey of 168 employees from over 30 companies in a Midwestern city was conducted to assess relationships among these variables. The results indicated that hours of work-related CMC activity outside of normal work hours contributed to perceptions of work life imbalance. However, positive attitudes toward new communication technologies predicted increased work life balance. Controlling for worker age and overall life stress, work life balance/imbalance was found to predict job burnout and job satisfaction, but not intention to leave the organization. The authors discuss implications of the study findings for theory and practice, limitations of the study, and directions for future research.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11688 words || 
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4. Vijayakumar, Gowri. "Is Sex Work Sex or is Sex Work Work? Analyzing Sex Worker Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726018_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates the ways in which gendered relationships to sex as work shape the possibilities for a “sex worker” identity among poor and working-class sex workers in Bangalore, India. To what extent can people who do sex work coalesce around a shared “sex worker” identity, and what are the limits to this coalition? Using interviews with male, female, and transgender members of a sex worker union, I show that the answer depends on gender, sexuality, and labor relations. Men, women, and transgender women articulate distinct relationships to “sex worker” identity because they experience sex work in distinct ways, falling on a spectrum from sex work as an extension of sex to sex work as an extension of work. For men, selling sex is intertwined with networks of unpaid sex pursued for pleasure, while for women and transgenders, sex work begins as a source of income, either to maintain a family income or to secure membership in the hijra community. For none of the groups does sex work itself emerge as a primary identity; instead, my interviewees most commonly identified as poor women workers, transgender women, or men who like to “do sex,” respectively. Nevertheless, shared work experiences allowed for solidarity—addressing shared stigma, violence and exploitation on the job, and the risks of disclosure. My analysis confirms feminist scholarship in suggesting that movements built on sex work as a form of gendered labor, rather than a unique personal identity, resonate with poor sex workers’ own experiences of work.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5124 words || 
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5. Pixley, Joy. "Work-Family and Work Outcomes Predicted by Past Work Hour Patterns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411823_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper expands the research linking work hours to work and work-family outcomes by taking a life-course approach to examining past patterns of work hours. I use data from the Cornell Community Study (631 men and 520 women in married and cohabiting couples), which provides retrospective job history data. A new method, the interpolated curve approach, is used to represent and compare respondents’ prior work hour histories, producing six empirically-derived clusters of work hour patterns. Work hour patterns differ substantially by sex, and show expected variation on current work hours, education, income, occupational status, and gender role attitudes. Regression analyses indicate that, net of current work hours and other current characteristics, past work hour patterns help to explain work-family spillover, work-family balance, and income for both men and women.
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