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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8741 words || 
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1. Gronewold, Katherine. and Wenzel, Kristina. "I Work to Live, Not Live to Work: How Generation Y Talks About Work, Career, and Work-Life Balance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368332_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the meanings that members of Generation Y prescribe to the concepts of work, career, and work-life balance and how these meanings will influence the workplace using the perspective of Jablin’s (1982) organizational assimilation. Findings suggest that members of Generation Y assess having a career more positively than "just working". Additionally, work-life balance is a priority, but one that many members of Generation Y do not feel is entirely achievable.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7517 words || 
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2. Okechukwu, Cassandra., Kelly, Erin., Sembajwe, Grace. and Berkman, Lisa. "“They work, work, work”: Work-Family Policies & Practices in Nursing Homes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505460_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on work-family policies abound, but most studies have focused on white-collar workers and settings or utilized nationally representative samples that generalize across populations of workers and organizations. Scholars lack detailed understanding of the dual management of paid work and family care work by low-wage workers, and know little about how employers of low-wage workers have responded to work-family issues. The racial/ethnic stratification of occupations implies that research on white-collar workers provides information primarily on white, native-born workers. We extend the previous literature on employers’ work-family policies by analyzing qualitative data on formal policies and management practices in four nursing homes with racially diverse and immigrant workers. Although a number of policies are officially available, there is clear evidence of decoupling of policy and everyday practice. We identify two reasons for this decoupling. First, there is a mismatch between the policies and management’s desire to maintain control over staffing practices and meet company goals regarding labor costs; this source of decoupling is related to findings in previous studies. Second, there is a mismatch between the policies and workers’ needs, as understood by their supervisors. These low-wage workers often try to maximize their income – even when that means less family time – so the work-family policies common in other organizations are viewed as unhelpful or irrelevant. This analysis confirms the essential role of managers as gatekeepers for workers wishing to utilize family-supportive policies but also documents that some managers creatively exploit decoupling of policy and practice to benefit or hinder workers.

2011 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 252 words || 
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3. Cloin, Marielle. "Work Smarter, not Harder? Work-Life Balance Policies and the Aim to Increase Working Hours in the Netherlands" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, Madrid, Spain, Jun 23, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p504730_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An important objective of the Dutch emancipation policy is to raise the labour market participation rate and the number of hours worked by women. Several studies show that financial incentives are not very effective, and instead more emphasis is on increasing the work life balance. The thought behind this, is that when it is easier to combine work and private life, people will experience less time pressure and therefore be able and willing to work more hours. However, one of the most applied strategies in the Netherlands is to reduce working hours and work part-time instead of full-time. This raises some questions: How do part-timers perceive their work-life balance compared to full-time workers? To which extend and under which conditions do people think it is possible to improve their work-life balance and are they also willing to work more hours?
The article is based on a Dutch survey that covers 2,500 men and women of working-time age. We find that although people think that their balance between work and private life can be improved, this does not automatically mean that they are willing to work more hours. Important policies aimed at encouraging better a work life balance appear to be flexible working hours, longer opening hours and flexibility in fitting paid work around personal life and care tasks. Although such policies could potentially lead an increase in working hours, this is by no means a guaranteed outcome. In order to achieve that, along with institutional changes, cultural changes are needed.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11688 words || 
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4. Vijayakumar, Gowri. "Is Sex Work Sex or is Sex Work Work? Analyzing Sex Worker Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726018_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates the ways in which gendered relationships to sex as work shape the possibilities for a “sex worker” identity among poor and working-class sex workers in Bangalore, India. To what extent can people who do sex work coalesce around a shared “sex worker” identity, and what are the limits to this coalition? Using interviews with male, female, and transgender members of a sex worker union, I show that the answer depends on gender, sexuality, and labor relations. Men, women, and transgender women articulate distinct relationships to “sex worker” identity because they experience sex work in distinct ways, falling on a spectrum from sex work as an extension of sex to sex work as an extension of work. For men, selling sex is intertwined with networks of unpaid sex pursued for pleasure, while for women and transgenders, sex work begins as a source of income, either to maintain a family income or to secure membership in the hijra community. For none of the groups does sex work itself emerge as a primary identity; instead, my interviewees most commonly identified as poor women workers, transgender women, or men who like to “do sex,” respectively. Nevertheless, shared work experiences allowed for solidarity—addressing shared stigma, violence and exploitation on the job, and the risks of disclosure. My analysis confirms feminist scholarship in suggesting that movements built on sex work as a form of gendered labor, rather than a unique personal identity, resonate with poor sex workers’ own experiences of work.

2015 - ASEEES Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Klots, Alissa. "How Non-Work Becomes Work: Paid Domestic Labor and the Construction of the Soviet Working Class, 1917-1941" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1019017_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In his famous speech on the goals of the Soviet female workers’ movement Vladimir Lenin called for liberation of women from the work he considered to be “insignificant, stupefying and unproductive” – domestic work. Only through gainful employment, women could become conscious members of the new society. In the eyes of the Soviet state it was only their labor outside the home that was productive and gave them a right to see themselves as “laborers.” The campaign for “liberation of women” coincided with another, less famous Bolshevik project – that of transforming domestic servants (prisluga) into domestic workers (domashnaia rabotnitsa). For women working as hired help household labor was the only justification for their claim for membership in the Soviet “working class.” This presentation will analyze how this tension between the gendered notions of “productive” and “nonproductive” labor shaped lives and identities of women working in domestic service.

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