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2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7517 words || 
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1. Okechukwu, Cassandra., Kelly, Erin., Sembajwe, Grace. and Berkman, Lisa. "“They work, work, work”: Work-Family Policies & Practices in Nursing Homes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505460_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on work-family policies abound, but most studies have focused on white-collar workers and settings or utilized nationally representative samples that generalize across populations of workers and organizations. Scholars lack detailed understanding of the dual management of paid work and family care work by low-wage workers, and know little about how employers of low-wage workers have responded to work-family issues. The racial/ethnic stratification of occupations implies that research on white-collar workers provides information primarily on white, native-born workers. We extend the previous literature on employers’ work-family policies by analyzing qualitative data on formal policies and management practices in four nursing homes with racially diverse and immigrant workers. Although a number of policies are officially available, there is clear evidence of decoupling of policy and everyday practice. We identify two reasons for this decoupling. First, there is a mismatch between the policies and management’s desire to maintain control over staffing practices and meet company goals regarding labor costs; this source of decoupling is related to findings in previous studies. Second, there is a mismatch between the policies and workers’ needs, as understood by their supervisors. These low-wage workers often try to maximize their income – even when that means less family time – so the work-family policies common in other organizations are viewed as unhelpful or irrelevant. This analysis confirms the essential role of managers as gatekeepers for workers wishing to utilize family-supportive policies but also documents that some managers creatively exploit decoupling of policy and practice to benefit or hinder workers.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 8741 words || 
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2. Gronewold, Katherine. and Wenzel, Kristina. "I Work to Live, Not Live to Work: How Generation Y Talks About Work, Career, and Work-Life Balance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368332_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the meanings that members of Generation Y prescribe to the concepts of work, career, and work-life balance and how these meanings will influence the workplace using the perspective of Jablin’s (1982) organizational assimilation. Findings suggest that members of Generation Y assess having a career more positively than "just working". Additionally, work-life balance is a priority, but one that many members of Generation Y do not feel is entirely achievable.

2011 - The Law and Society Association Words: 309 words || 
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3. Porter, Aaron. "WORK IN PROGRESS PAPER--ACCEPTED 02--1930s New Deal Legislation and Its Legal Underpinning for Fair Employment Practices: The Work of William H. Brown and his work with EEOC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Westin St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, CA, May 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498412_index.html>
Publication Type: Work in Progress Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper provides a historical account of the history of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1965 to 2000, with its utility for similar organizations such as the Race Relations Committee in London, England, especially during an important U.S. civil rights era. Between 1965 and the early 1970s, the U.S. commission was perceived as a “toothless tiger” that was being used to shape, educate the public, and influence fair employment practices. Lost in the discussion, however, is the critical legal work of William H. Brown, the commission’s chairman in 1969. This paper therefore provides a socio-legal analysis by evaluating the revolutionary way in which Brown utilized new deal legislation as a model for fair U.S. employment practices, in particular the 1934 laws that governed the U.S. Security and Exchange Commission and the National Relations Board in 1935. This paper goes into great detail regarding the laws and regulations of the period, including the enforcement powers that were provided the National Relations Board and the Security and Exchange Commission. Brown used such legislation and federal organizational practices as a legal basis for Commission enforcement powers, setting up regulations or rules which had the force of law, passed by Congress and reinforced by the U.S. Supreme Court. This essay provides a sociological context for Brown’s work on the Commission, including President Johnson’s work in helping to create the government agency, urban riots, and model cities programs and activities. I detail how Brown understands and utilizes U.S. history, Houstonian jurisprudence, and how politics and the political economy operate. The idea here is to show the multi-facet ways and approaches to which an attorney practices law within a democratic culture, society, and civil rights era. It also provides the underpinning of peripheral legal thinking, research, and practical ways in which lawyers affect society, with implications for 21st Century practices of legal practitioners.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6366 words || 
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4. Wright, Kevin. "Work-Related Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and Work Life Balance: The Influence of New Communication Technologies on Perceived Work Life Balance, Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Intention to Leave the Organization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p635107_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate employee perceptions of the influence of new communication technologies on perceptions of work life balance, burnout, intention to leave the organization, and job satisfaction. An on-line survey of 168 employees from over 30 companies in a Midwestern city was conducted to assess relationships among these variables. The results indicated that hours of work-related CMC activity outside of normal work hours contributed to perceptions of work life imbalance. However, positive attitudes toward new communication technologies predicted increased work life balance. Controlling for worker age and overall life stress, work life balance/imbalance was found to predict job burnout and job satisfaction, but not intention to leave the organization. The authors discuss implications of the study findings for theory and practice, limitations of the study, and directions for future research.

2015 - ASEEES Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Klots, Alissa. "How Non-Work Becomes Work: Paid Domestic Labor and the Construction of the Soviet Working Class, 1917-1941" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1019017_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In his famous speech on the goals of the Soviet female workers’ movement Vladimir Lenin called for liberation of women from the work he considered to be “insignificant, stupefying and unproductive” – domestic work. Only through gainful employment, women could become conscious members of the new society. In the eyes of the Soviet state it was only their labor outside the home that was productive and gave them a right to see themselves as “laborers.” The campaign for “liberation of women” coincided with another, less famous Bolshevik project – that of transforming domestic servants (prisluga) into domestic workers (domashnaia rabotnitsa). For women working as hired help household labor was the only justification for their claim for membership in the Soviet “working class.” This presentation will analyze how this tension between the gendered notions of “productive” and “nonproductive” labor shaped lives and identities of women working in domestic service.

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