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2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 96 words || 
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1. Shively, Beth. ""If Boys Would be Men, Would Women be Ladies?": Gender in Christian Youth Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, Nov 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p512272_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: “If boys would be men, would women be ladies?” Christian author Joshua Harris poses this question in his relationship self-help book for young singles, Boy Meets Girl: Say Hello to Courtship. Using the language of feminism, Harris acknowledges that women suffer from living in a “chauvinistic” culture. However, he argues that the solution to a chauvinistic culture is a return to essentialist gender roles, where men are leaders and women are protected under their authority. This paper explores the colonization of feminist ideas and language by the Christian courtship movement and broader Christian youth culture.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 7099 words || 
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2. Beaulieu, Emily. and Speulda, Nicole. "Healthy Relationships: How Changes to the Current Structure of Healthcare in America would Help Individuals Achieve Gender Equity in Marriage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p42105_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In Justice, Gender, and the Family, Susan Moller Okin argues for an equal division of paid and unpaid labor among spouses, as the solution to gender inequity in modern marriage. While Okin’s argument about gender inequities within marriage turns on the effects of sexism and gender roles, the importance of economic realities should not be overlooked. In addition to gender-based discrimination, our society’s current structure of paid labor effectively undermines the achievement of gender equity. Working in tandem with sexism, the need for at least one full-time employee in a family makes the equal division of paid and unpaid labor highly impractical in most cases. Beginning from the premise that the full-time employment imperative presents a significant obstacle to true equality in the home, this paper identifies one factor that contributes to the need for full-time employment: healthcare. A move away from employer provided healthcare, which currently privileges full-time employment, would reduce as least some of the need families feel to have one full-time wage earner, and would represent a tangible step toward the achievement of Okin’s ideal.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 8667 words || 
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3. Bleek, Philipp. "Would 'Deterrence of Negligence' Reduce the Risk of Catastrophic Terrorism?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151547_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Frustrated with the failure of more orthodox strategies to stem the risk of mass destruction terrorism, particularly with nuclear weapons, analysts have begun to advocate threatening deterrent retaliation against states whose insecure mass destruction weapons and materials are stolen and used in terrorist attacks against the United States. After elaborating on what is here termed “deterrence of negligence,” the paper evaluates a narrowly defined question: what would be the effect of the United States enunciating, either publicly or through private channels, a deterrence of negligence policy? This question is addressed in three parts. First, the status of current unilateral and cooperative efforts to secure vulnerable nuclear materials and weapons in the two case countries, Russia and Pakistan, is detailed. Second, the contribution of a deterrence of negligence policy towards preventing a terrorist attack with mass destruction weapons prior to such an attack is assessed. Third, the contribution of the policy towards making follow-on attacks less likely in the aftermath of an initial attack is assessed. Finally, in the context of a skeptical assessment of deterrence of negligence’s ability to ameliorate the threat of mass destruction terrorism, the paper briefly considers potential alternative strategies that could either complement or substitute for it.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 12022 words || 
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4. Imai, Kunihiko. "Would Culture, or Civilization, Affect the Impact of Internationalization of National Economy on Democracy?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p98074_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many scholars posit that the globalization of national ecnomies has weakened states' control over their societies among developing countries, thus rendering support to their improved civil liberties. Some scholars, such as Samuel Huntington, however, would argue that states from different "civilizational" groups are so fundamentally different that they react differently toward a similar change, such as the internationalization of their conomies or democratization of their societies. This paper empirically test the validity of this "Clash of Civilizations" thesis. More specifically, it examines whether Confucian and Islamic states react differently from the rest of the world toward the increased internationalization of their economy, thus allowing less improvements in their civil liberties.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 206 words || 
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5. Miller, Monica., Adya, Meera. and Chamberlain, Jared C.. "“If Only I Would Have…": How Counterfactual Thinking Affects Willingness to Report a Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32521_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper presents two studies examining the influence of counterfactual thinking (CFT) and injury severity on victims’ decision to report crime. CFT occurs when people imagine that they could have prevented a negative outcome (e.g., “If only I’d taken a different route home, I wouldn’t have been mugged”). Injury severity is also manipulated to determine whether severity and CFT interact. Participants read a stimuli paragraph and imagined that they were mugged. A 2 (CFT absent/present) X 3 (low/medium/high monetary loss) ANOVA supported the hypothesis that CFT participants were significantly more likely to report a crime and felt angrier than participants in the CFT absent condition. CFT participants were more likely to believe the crime could have been prevented and that luck played a role in the crime. Results also indicate that severe monetary loss increased reporting and anger. There was no interaction between injury and CFT for reporting. However, CFT/high injury participants felt more foolish than other groups. A second study tests a different CFT manipulation and manipulates physical (rather than monetary) injury. This second study will expand and generalize the first study. These findings indicate that the psychological phenomenon of CFT affects perceptions of the crime and willingness to report.

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