Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 11 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3  - Next
2015 - The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Words: 231 words || 
Info
1. White, Karissa. "More than an “Indian Pow Wow”: ‘Historyland’ as a Site for Native Activism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Jun 04, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p987420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 1954, entrepreneur Tony Wise created ‘Historyland,’ a Hayward, Wisconsin tourist attraction complete with a reproduction of a nineteenth-century logging camp and an ‘authentic’ Indian village featuring Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) Ojibwe demonstrating cultural activities such as processing wild rice. Historyland also hosted weekly “Indian Pow Wows.” Scholars have placed the phenomenon of Indian performance for tourism in the post-WWII era within the historical context of Cold War identity politics in which non-Native Americans sought to distinguish themselves from the ‘Other.’ While they argue this spectacle reinforced American national identity, I argue that it also reinforced Native peoples’ identity, leading to an increased awareness of themselves within a broader pan-Indian nationhood, which will become vital to the rising 1960s Red Power movement. In this paper, I acknowledge the critique that these performances for the touristic gaze perpetuated negative stereotypes and created misleading notions of Indian authenticity; however, there is more to this story. By drawing upon oral histories collected from Historyland’s Indian village and powwow participants, I contend that their involvement not only helped preserve traditional Ojibwe heritage, but also contributed to a growing pan-Indian powwow culture, which fostered Indian pride and unity among the local Ojibwe and other Native people. Ultimately, Historyland participation helped motivate a particular generation of Native youth and young adults to engage in the political activism of AIM and/or become future community leaders and cultural educators.

2016 - Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting Words: 201 words || 
Info
2. Kemp, Leonard., Munoz, Cynthia. and Smyth, Katherine. "Stepping Beyond the Wow Factor: A 3D Archaeological Investigation of the Black Vulture Site, Bandera County, Texas." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Texas Tech University, Junction, TX, Mar 04, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1113970_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past five years the development and use of 3D technologies in archaeology has moved from a highly specialized and expensive process to one that is relatively easy and inexpensive. The use of Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry and 3D software allowing archaeologists to intuitively create models fosters new ways of analysis. As such this type of documentation should soon no longer elicit “wow,” but become a standard methodological tool employed by archaeologists. In 2015, the Center for Archaeological Research conducted an archaeological investigation of the Black Vulture Shelter and began using SfM photogrammetry to document this excavation, later bringing 3D models into a GIS environment to quantify the data. Advantages to using this method included faster and more accurate recording of the site, as well as the capability to view and analyze the virtual site. In addition, 3D models are an excellent outreach tool which allow both the archaeological and general public to interact with cultural resources. Disadvantages included the creation of large and cumbersome data files and long data processing times. However, we believe that the advantages of using this method outweigh the disadvantages and as the method becomes more common the analytical component will improve..

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 1 words || 
Info
3. Hou, Chia-I. "Hofstede in WOW: A Cultural Comparison to Examine Five Culture Dimensions in Online Role Playing Games" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396711_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2012 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 257 words || 
Info
4. Watters, Shawn. ""Wow~! That was fantastic!" Collaborative Peer Feedback, how your teaching impacted my teaching." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Riverwalk Hotel, San Antonio, Texas, Feb 11, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524039_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The early childhood teacher education candidates participated in the collaborative peer feedback experience during the pre-clinical placement to understand, inform and to reflect on their own practices after observing a peer's teaching. The results/reflections will be shared relating to developing professional identities and further independent inquiry.

2013 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 272 words || 
Info
5. Zabban, Vinciane. "Play Another Game ? A Sociotechnical Approach of WoW Private Servers." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Town and Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, Oct 09, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p667978_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Alongside the growth of Internet and Game Studies fields, there is a need for a sociotechnical approach of games, and of videogames and online games in particular. Thus, T.L. Taylor noted how play activity relied on a sociotechnical assemblage. For their part, Stefano de Paoli and Aphra Kerr, through working of cheating practices and definition, have shown how the social and technical territories of online games actually are negotiated continuously between various actors - developers, players, cheating companies, etc. In my own researches regarding the relationship between game users and producers, I also highlighted how the definition of a shared space for players is negotiated between heterogeneous social worlds (Strauss, Clarke & Star) through a complex agencement of mediations. Within this agencement, developers and editors appear in a dominant position as they theoretically are the only ones who can handle and change the game world rules - including social, technical and legal rules. My communication will investigates the ambiguities and resources of the central position of the game masters by focusing on how their authority is challenged by some actors, who are developing alternative places to play. The private servers are illegal copies of the original online game, which are ruled and played by a few individuals in margin from the largest players community. Relying on an empirical fieldwork conducted on official and private servers of World of Warcraft (online ethnography, participant observation, interviews), I will try show how this marginal and little studied phenomenon (Debeauvais & Nardi), can contribute to a better understanding of the role of sociotechnical infrastructures in complex social arenas that are online game worlds.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3  - Next

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy